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Old 09-09-2010, 11:22 PM   #1
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Pantry wiring


I'm trying to plan out the wiring for my Butlers Pantry. It isn't large, but will house a dishwasher, sink with disposal, most likely my coffee pot, a pop-up toaster, oven toaster, and possibly even my micro-wave.

Currently, the room is fed with one 20amp circuit. There is a 20amp GFCI, 1st in line, it then feeds a receptacle in an adjoining wall pantry, which will likely house the micro-wave and possibly a small TV. The GFCI also feeds 3 receptacles on the countertop of this room, which is where the appliances listed above will be most likely stored and used.

This room was once converted to a laundry and I'm converting it back, so currently there is no sink/garbage disposal or dishwasher. That's where the question lies. Would it likely be too much for to place them on the same circuit as the rest or should they be placed on their own independent circuit?

I'm actually a bit concerned about the other appliances as well. I know the coffee pot, microwave and toasters are big draws. Currently, they are in the kitchen on a 15amp circuit (maybe 20amp - have to check) and it seems if the micro-wave, toaster and coffee pot are on the breaker trips, but that circuit also houses the fridge. I know the toaster and coffee pot are fine, but I am pretty sure my wife used the micro-wave the other morning while using them and it tripped. There is a possibility the coffee pot won't go in that room, but that's up for debate....

The last question is if I run a seperate circuit for the dishwasher and disposal, does it need to be GFI'd?

Thanks for any help...

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Old 09-10-2010, 01:24 AM   #2
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Pantry wiring


Where are you from?

Kitchens have specific requirements. You are required to have (2) 20A "small-appliance" (outlet) circuits that feed countertop receptacles. Fixed appliances should be on their own circuits, though I think it's acceptable to put the diswasher and disposal together. Take a look at this image from Dave's sticky post...


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Old 09-10-2010, 12:59 PM   #3
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Pantry wiring


Quote:
Originally Posted by secutanudu View Post
Where are you from?

Kitchens have specific requirements. You are required to have (2) 20A "small-appliance" (outlet) circuits that feed countertop receptacles. Fixed appliances should be on their own circuits, though I think it's acceptable to put the diswasher and disposal together. Take a look at this image from Dave's sticky post...
I'm in Kansas.

I'll check out that post, but if you count the pantry as the kitchen, which I'd assume it is, I will end up with a total of 4, if not 5 seperate circuits, not including stove and lighting. I should be covered!

Right, now I'm just focused on the pantry, because I'm trying to get it done before moving on. I think I'll go ahead and install the garbage disposal and dishwasher on a seperate circuit and possibly place a switch outlet combo where the switch for the dishwasher goes, that way, worst case I have at least one outlet on a different circuit on the countertop if stuff trips the breaker the other way.

I guess the next question is this, can I place a GFCI inside the cabinet for the circuit with the dishwasher, garbage disposal and switch outlet combo? If not, I'll have to get a GFCI breaker!

Oh and by the way, I checked the breaker where the coffee pot, toaster, fridge and micro-wave are plugged in and it's only a 15amp circuit. That gives me hope that the countertop in the pantry being 20amp will work fine, especially if I place the dishwasher on it' own circuit.
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Old 09-10-2010, 01:17 PM   #4
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Pantry wiring


Dishwasher & disposal usually go on one dedicated circuit
The other items you mention can be power hogs
Since its considered part of the kitchen you could extend the SABC to the pantry
I plan on having a min of 4 SABC in my kitchen
Then a 5th in the dining room
And a 6th in the adjoining sunroom
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