Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-12-2009, 06:19 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Arkansas
Posts: 323
Rewards Points: 250
Default

outside distribution box


I have this box on the outside of my house supplying power to different places. It supplies power to the main breaker box inside the house, the detached garage panel, dryer, and an air conditioner circuit. Iím guessing that the pull out thingies have fuses on the back. The connector with the two visible green fuses is marked Ďspareí and has no wires to or from it.

I want to add a new panel in the upstairs of my house. The main circuit breaker in the house just behind this outside box is full. Can install another circuit into this box and make the run to the upstairs? What are the connectors called that I would need to install in this outside box. After all I canít go in and just ask for connector thingies If I add a panel upstairs from this outside box would it be classed as a sub panel or main and would I separate the neutrals and grounds in it? From what I understand it would be a sub panel since this is the first panel after the meter. Correct?
If I install a 100 amp panel but only want to supply 60 amps capacity how do I handle that? Can I simply remove the panels 100 amp breaker and install a 60 amp breaker. Will a standard 60 amp breaker physically fit the removed 100 amp breaker or will I need to install it down on the output lugs and back feed it? The upstairs panel will only handle two baths and three bedrooms plus hall plus a planned gas fired heating unit in the attic. No other appliances so Iím guessing 60 amps and 8 to 12 circuits would be plenty. Most of the upstairs wiring is knob and tube presently which of course is the reason for the upgrade. Is there a better way to go about doing this? Thanks
Attached Thumbnails
outside distribution box-outside-view.jpg   outside distribution box-outside-opened.jpg  


Last edited by Mike in Arkansas; 08-12-2009 at 09:54 PM. Reason: pics asking to login
Mike in Arkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 07:29 PM   #2
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 2,559
Rewards Points: 2,014
Default

outside distribution box


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in Arkansas View Post
I have this box on the outside of my house supplying power to different places. It supplies power to the main breaker box inside the house, the detached garage panel, dryer, and an air conditioner circuit. I’m guessing that the pull out thingies have fuses on the back. The connector with the two visible green fuses is marked ‘spare’ and has no wires to or from it.

I want to add a new panel in the upstairs of my house. The main circuit breaker in the house just behind this outside box is full. Can install another circuit into this box and make the run to the upstairs? What are the connectors called that I would need to install in this outside box. After all I can’t go in and just ask for connector thingies If I add a panel upstairs from this outside box would it be classed as a sub panel or main and would I separate the neutrals and grounds in it? From what I understand it would be a sub panel since this is the first panel after the meter. Correct?
If I install a 100 amp panel but only want to supply 60 amps capacity how do I handle that? Can I simply remove the panels 100 amp breaker and install a 60 amp breaker. Will a standard 60 amp breaker physically fit the removed 100 amp breaker or will I need to install it down on the output lugs and back feed it? The upstairs panel will only handle two baths and three bedrooms plus hall plus a planned gas fired heating unit in the attic. No other appliances so I’m guessing 60 amps and 8 to 12 circuits would be plenty. Most of the upstairs wiring is knob and tube presently which of course is the reason for the upgrade. Is there a better way to go about doing this? Thanks
It sounds like you probably need to upgrade your service. The type of service you describe sounds like an old 60A panel with pull out fuses. I'm surprised it can handle the load that's already on it, and it is unlikely that it can safely or legally handle more. Probably the most economical solution would be to replace your service entrance equipment with a new 200A panel that feeds the existing loads and also includes whatever new circuits you were planning to install. Definitely consult with an electrician.


Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 08-12-2009 at 07:41 PM. Reason: pics causing problem
mpoulton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 07:42 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

outside distribution box


Your pictures were not showing up & have been removed
They were prompting people to login to view

Thanks
-Dave
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 10:02 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Arkansas
Posts: 323
Rewards Points: 250
Default

outside distribution box


My apologies for the pictures. I copied and pasted from a word processor. Should be fixed now. I do have a 200 amp service. It supplies a 100 amp panel just behind the wall which is full, a 60 amp detached garage and a couple of individual circuits.

I have spent quite a bit of time on this forum and have not seen this particular installation. Advice is appreciated help for the original posting. Perhaps a couple of more pictures would be of help. Thanks.
Attached Thumbnails
outside distribution box-main-breaker-box-1.jpg   outside distribution box-outdoor-up1.jpg   outside distribution box-outdoor-boxs.jpg   outside distribution box-outside-detail2.jpg  
Mike in Arkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 10:55 PM   #5
My License Ain't 4 Sale..
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Atlanta, Ga/Hamilton, Al
Posts: 1,813
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

outside distribution box


The two screw fuses aren't being used, so you could get a 30 A subfeed from there if you wanted, or two 20 A branch circuits. Also, you could parallel tap one of the fuse blocks and power another panel, but that is quite an advanced topic for DIY. But, the idea is that you would disconnect the lines from the fuse block, and using an insulated tap (trade name: polaris lug), you could wire your old wires and new wires into the same block, and both panels would be powered by the same set of fuses.

You would need to make sure of course that the fuses match the wire size. And you need a four wire feed to the new panel, the grounds and neutrals being seperated at the sub.
InPhase277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 10:57 PM   #6
My License Ain't 4 Sale..
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Atlanta, Ga/Hamilton, Al
Posts: 1,813
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

outside distribution box


Just re-reading, what is in the garage? If there is alot of load there, why not power the garage from the 30 A screw-in fuses and use that 60 A block for your new panel?
InPhase277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 12:53 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Arkansas
Posts: 323
Rewards Points: 250
Default

outside distribution box


Quote:
Originally Posted by InPhase277 View Post
Just re-reading, what is in the garage? If there is alot of load there, why not power the garage from the 30 A screw-in fuses and use that 60 A block for your new panel?
That would be a great idea except I have a woodworking shop out there and not sure 30 amps would be sufficient. Can the connectors not be moved to make room for one more somehow. Maybe take out the 30 amp block and replace with a 60 amp. Is there a problem getting these fuse connectors now? A Polaris lug is a splicing block correct? If I paralleled the circuits, say off of the top fuse block that provides power to the main breaker panel, would I just need to put larger fuses in the same fuse block. 160 amp? Or would I need a new larger fuse block? Thanks for taking time to help. Oh yeah, one more question. Since I have a three wire feed coming in how do I provide a fourth wire to a subpanel?

Mike in Arkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Septic Distribution box holding water Karly&Gerry Plumbing 2 06-05-2009 10:25 AM
Low profile junction box or distribution block for line voltage undercabinet lights ? Bluelude1 Electrical 2 05-01-2008 08:52 PM
Copper pipe type for residential water distribution BigJimmy Plumbing 7 12-31-2007 09:39 AM
load distribution sporthead200369 Building & Construction 1 04-28-2007 09:54 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.