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Old 01-25-2013, 02:20 PM   #46
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Outlet Meltdown...


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Originally Posted by kreemoweet View Post
"Sounds like more FUD from a non-electrician working for a
landlord who just doesn't want to bear the expense of providing adequate
and safe electrical systems in their rental units.


The thing is fixed. An official “electrician" is not needed here. In most instances a general handy man is more than qualified for this type of work. Even a knowledgeable landlord can work on his own properties.

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Old 01-25-2013, 03:39 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by crescere

The thing is fixed. An official “electrician" is not needed here. In most instances a general handy man is more than qualified for this type of work. Even a knowledgeable landlord can work on his own properties.
In many states you need a licensed electrician to work on any rental property or multi-family structure. In NJ a homeowner can only do their own electrical work if they live in a single family detached residence that is owner occupied with their immediate family only. Everything else is off-limits to DIY even if you are the owner/landlord of the building.
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:15 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by clydesdale View Post
In many states you need a licensed electrician to work on any rental property or multi-family structure. In NJ a homeowner can only do their own electrical work if they live in a single family detached residence that is owner occupied with their immediate family only. Everything else is off-limits to DIY even if you are the owner/landlord of the building.
In NY it's even more scary not licensing requirements at all.
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:25 PM   #49
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In many states you need a licensed electrician to work on any rental property or multi-family structure.
That is just more over the top government intervention in people’s business. In the end it is the tenants who pay because rent rates will go up in that state. There is absolutely no reason an experienced landlord cannot learn to correctly put in a standard outlet, GFCI, or a switch. He will do the same thing an electrician would do.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:13 PM   #50
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If your logic is sound would you care to have me do some chiropractic adjustments to your neck. I have no license but I learned it by watching you tube videos. A license does not make an electrician good, but it will increase the chances. But really we are wasting our time telling you to get someone qualified, you will never spend the money.
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:46 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crescere View Post
The thing is fixed. An official “electrician" is not needed here. In most instances a general handy man is more than qualified for this type of work. Even a knowledgeable landlord can work on his own properties.
Not really most landlords should know the law pretty well and the requirement will varies a little in most states but generally pretty restrictive what the Landlords can do and what not.

Oh by the way don't tempeting to use the handyman for more than just a basic items.

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Originally Posted by clydesdale View Post
In many states you need a licensed electrician to work on any rental property or multi-family structure. In NJ a homeowner can only do their own electrical work if they live in a single family detached residence that is owner occupied with their immediate family only. Everything else is off-limits to DIY even if you are the owner/landlord of the building.
Clyesdale did make a point and of course I am electrician and I have see alot of .,, let say a good mess up work what some of the landlords and tentants done to the electrique system.

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That is just more over the top government intervention in people’s business. In the end it is the tenants who pay because rent rates will go up in that state. There is absolutely no reason an experienced landlord cannot learn to correctly put in a standard outlet, GFCI, or a switch. He will do the same thing an electrician would do.
Again there is specfic items what the Landlord can do and what they can not do.

I know in State of Wisconsin the landlord only can replace the lamp ( light bulb ) and possiblty a switch or receptale only but to extend a circuit or other type of repairs that is off limits ( larger metros will not allow landlord do any of those item as I mention )

Merci,
Marc
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:48 PM   #52
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I live in an older house that was split into 4 units in Calgary, Alberta Canada and I rent. I have had a problem with this one outlet before in my place in which I phoned the landlord to get somebody to fix it; she did. But, another outlet has blown in a different location, in which case it blew and melted the outlet and casing. I ended up not phoning when this one happened due to the fact of the riga-moroll it took to get her to fix the initial one. Now, just last night the outlet that she supposedly got the guy to fix was melting and smoldering but nothing was plugged into it. I had a friend over and both me and him could smell it but no sign of the meltdown until after. How is this possible? Should I be quite worried of fire? I have 2 pics but dont know how to attach them here. Any suggestions will help, thank you.
I have only ever heard this expression in Calgary.
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:43 PM   #53
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It's an older expression. I heard it a lot in Calif. back in the 50's and 60's. Still do on occassion. I hear it a bit more when I visit the midwest, but that might be more of the generation I'm hearing it from, rather than the geographic.
Rigamarole is a variant of the term rigmarole.
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Old 01-26-2013, 04:19 PM   #54
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If your logic is sound would you care to have me do some chiropractic adjustments to your neck. I have no license but I learned it by watching you tube videos.


You are equating a medical procedure to installing an outlet or switch? Really?
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:40 PM   #55
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I can use my space heater off the stove outlet as it has 1000 watts

Karl
Just one issue, most typical space heaters are 1500 watts far as I remember, 1500 on high, about 1200 on low.
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:49 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by crescere View Post
There is absolutely no reason an experienced landlord cannot learn to correctly put in a standard outlet, GFCI, or a switch. He will do the same thing an electrician would do.
Yeah I agree there, it certainly isn't rocket science to attach three color coded wires taken off the old outlet and put onto the new one and tighten the screws!
That comes under "repairs" not remodelling or renovation, or installing new circuits, and I know back in NYC it was typical for the building's superintendant or handyman (usually lives in) to do such repairs, as well as paint, repair broken windows, patch the roof, clean the hallways, repair the toilet, water leaks, leaking faucet, maintain the boiler, minor carpentry etc.

Imagine calling and paying a plumber to come all the way out with a helper just to replace a 25 cent rubber washer in the bathroom faucet that drips!
Sure, there's plenty of idiots out there who can't even figure out how to do that, but most people with some common sense can figure out how to do a minor repair like fixing a leaking faucet, a broken receptacle, or replace a frayed lamp cord.
Good grief, if a homeowner had to call a contractor every time something needed adjustment or minor fix they would never be able to afford to live in a house.
I'm a very handy type guy, I watch and I learn, and on the job back in the 80s I worked in a 9 story commercial building in NYC, my immediate boss- the building super was about 70 at the time, and he worked there for a long time. One day the air compressor on the pressure tank for the flush toilets seized up, I went to look at it and the crankcase was BONE DRY! I asked the guy if he ever put oil in it, and he replied that he had no idea it took oil... Just about every pump and motor in the boiler room failed because he didn't know you had to lubricate them!
There I was, barely over 18 and even I knew these should be lubed!
Once, I watched the elevator repair guy work in the control room and quickly learned how it all worked, it came in handy the day a too full car of factory workers got stuck between floors, I forget how, it was something with the door contact. I was able to override the bad door contact and bring the car to the ground floor landing from downstairs in the control room, it was no big deal, I watched, I learned, I successfully applied the knowlege during an emergency.

I also learned how to fill the 2 oil fired boilers with water if the level was low, and how they operated, I noticed an odd thing going on with them, that every WEEK the boiler repair guys were coming in to replace firebrick on the inside of the fronts of the boilers because they would fall down. Every time they came it cost $3500 (I saw the bills) and they just dumped the old brick in a pile on the floor, so one day on my night shift I climbed inside the back of the boiler with a flashlight to look, and I could immediately tell what the problem was- they were using a piece of thin angle iron across the whole width of the boiler, and the angle iron was the only thing supporting about 6 courses of firebrick.
It was easy to tell the heat was twisting the angle iron, it would weaken and the bricks would cave in, so Monday I chatted with the landlord's agent and told him what the PROBLEM was, apparantly no one thought it strange the bricks had to constantly be replaced every week for $3500 a shot 6 or 8 times in a row! Every time this happened the boilers were shut down for 2-3 days and it was a real pain in the arse in the winter!
My suggested fix: cut and mortar the bricks into a self-supporting arched configuration to eliminate the angle iron, once that was done to the boiler's firebrick, they never had the problem again! A freaking 18 year old 9th grade dropout kid has to tell these clowns how to properly fix the boiler!
Then there was the painter in a crew painting the windows on that building who decided to put his safety rope around a projection on the roof while he was suspended below on an electric scaffold 9 floors up. I had to tell him his safety rope was wrapped around a foot tall cylinder of TAR PAPER that covered the remnants of what was left of a stub of a rotted old wood flagpole, are people really this stupid? I thought after seeing that.

Point is I guess, someone like that superintendent who didn't even know moving machinery takes oil and grease, or someone who would put a safety line over a piece of tarpaper covering a rotted flag pole stub- should maybe have gotten jobs as janitors or something and stayed away from the building systems and high risk occupations, while someone like me is so obviously capable of replacing a damaged receptacle- geez!

Last edited by RWolff; 01-28-2013 at 10:15 PM.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:28 PM   #57
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Related to this outlet meltdown, right diagonally across the street from me a house burned to the ground and killed a woman and 3 kids sleeping there, by the time a local cop noticed smoke it was too late.
They had: Exposed insulation in the ceilings as they were doing some renovations, no smoke detectors,no fire extinguishers.
The cause of the fire was a lamp cord going to a ceiling lamp, the cord had become entrapped in a hide-a-bed and that was the cause of the fire- damage to the cord being squashed, and it didn't immediately short out, it took time for the rubber or insulation to finally give out under the crushing from the metal frame, and it shorted out around 2 AM and caught the foam on fire.
Once that stuff got burning, the drapes and carpet went up and the exposed insulation (Im assuming it was celotex or styrofoam board) caught on and the place was so hot the firemen coudln't even try a rescue.

Lesson to be learned is, don't play wait and see games with defective wiring, damaged cords, damaged outlets, outlets that smoke or show obvious heat damage. Four people are dead because of a lamp cord and no smoke alarm, the only good thing that came out if it all was, it sparked a movement...
The city in conjunction with the surviving relatives, and a donation of smoke detectors by the manufacturer (Kidde)- advertised that FREE smoke alarms were available to every resident in the city, all 900 households.
The fire dept and volunteers from the Red Cross and residents fanned out in crews to go door to door to every household in the city to check/provide free batteries if you had smoke alarms, and install up to 2 free smoke alarms per household if you had one or none.
I heard they installed about 400 smoke alarms, and these were not the cheap models, these are actually very good quality smoke alarms.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:34 PM   #58
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If your logic is sound would you care to have me do some chiropractic adjustments to your neck. I have no license but I learned it by watching you tube videos.
Reminded me of my local gun shop owner's suggestion to me when I bought my first revolver and asked about instruction and a range, he said he knew of no instructors and that I might just have to go to the range and just shoot at the target and learn that way.
That's sort of like learning how to drive a tractor trailer- by watching one being driven on Youtube I said to him, looks easy untill you get behind the wheel and need to back the 60' trailer up into a garage or loading dock
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:35 AM   #59
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Quick question - why isn't the breaker tripping before the outlet melts?
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:53 AM   #60
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Outlet Meltdown...


Bad connections don't usually cause breakers to trip. It's shorts or overloads that cause breaker trips.

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