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Old 05-28-2011, 05:51 PM   #1
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I have an outlet box on the back of my house. I wanted to Extend the outlet to the other end of my yard, running all cords underground. Where the existing outlet is I wanted to place an outdoor on/off switch. At the end of my line I wanted to put a GFCI outlet. Does anyone know if the on/off switch will cause my GFCI outlet to trip?

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Old 05-28-2011, 06:27 PM   #2
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Only if you have leakage. The switch will have to be a weather type, really should be where the GFCI is at the porch. Keep in mind the length of run determines if you will either need to pull #10 or #12.

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Old 05-28-2011, 08:19 PM   #3
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Thank you!
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:22 PM   #4
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no romex outside or in conduit outside/underground
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:34 PM   #5
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I purchased the 12/2 outdoor wire and was going to run it through pvc conduit 19 inches deep just for added protection. The outlet currently on my back wall is not GFCI. It is standard outlet with a weatherproof bubble on it. It was going to completely remove the outlet, replace it with an on/off switch with a weatherproof on/off faceplate, run the cable underground and install an electrical box on my back wall which will house the CFGI outlet with an in-use weatherproof box over the outlet. The outlet will control a pond pump. I will be running the line about 40 ft.
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Old 05-28-2011, 09:05 PM   #6
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Can not run UF in Conduit. Only time, is to protect as it exits from the ground to enter a structure. If running Conduit from point A to B, you need to use the proper wiring, not try to cut corners. If only a 15 amp circuit, you will be fine with #14. I would go with #12, so that way if you ever need to plug in a weedwacker, or something else at that outlet, you will be fine making it a 20 amp circuit.
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Old 05-28-2011, 09:13 PM   #7
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Should I not use conduit then? Just bury the cable underground and only use conduit from electrical box to the ground? Should it extend a few inches into the ground? The 12/2 UF B is safe for direct contact underground right?
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Old 05-28-2011, 09:48 PM   #8
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Can not run UF in Conduit.
Says who???? I agree it's kinda silly, but as far as I can see the code allows it.
NEC 340.10
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Old 05-28-2011, 09:59 PM   #9
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Says who???? I agree it's kinda silly, but as far as I can see the code allows it.
NEC 340.10
As I stated before, UF or Underground Feeder can only be ran through conduit to protect as it exits a structure to enter the ground. You would have to derate if wanting to run through conduit, which is overkill.
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Old 05-29-2011, 01:08 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
As I stated before, UF or Underground Feeder can only be ran through conduit to protect as it exits a structure to enter the ground. You would have to derate if wanting to run through conduit, which is overkill.
further explanation please. Where does it say you have to derate?
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Old 05-29-2011, 01:16 AM   #11
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Now im really confused!
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Old 05-29-2011, 01:50 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by jc505 View Post
Now im really confused!
UF cable can be direct buried. It does have to be in conduit where it is above ground.

I can't find a code reference to indicate that combining UF into conduit underground is an issue. If it's a derating issue, I believe it's a heat related situation that involves running too many cables together in a tight space, thus causing overheating. If you're running one UF cable, I don't see an issue.
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Old 05-29-2011, 08:12 AM   #13
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To properly protect the UF it should be in conduit from the 18" below grade to where it enters the house. The OP mentioned a couple of inches.
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Old 05-30-2011, 10:58 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
As I stated before, UF or Underground Feeder can only be ran through conduit to protect as it exits a structure to enter the ground. You would have to derate if wanting to run through conduit, which is overkill.
Not sure where you're getting these from.

The NEC does not prohibit running UF underground in conduit, even for the entire length of a circuit.

A single UF cable installed in a conduit (either 2 c plus ground, OR 3 c. plus ground) would NOT have to be derated, as there would only be either 2 or 3 current-carrying conductors present. The ampacity adjustments begins at "more than 3 current-carrying conductors".

jc505:
Although allowed, the UF in conduit idea is overkill. Just buy some THWN conductors to pull in the conduit you were planning to install. Much easier than UF to work with, and you can pull them out and change them if you need to upsize in the future (assuming your conduit is big enough).
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Last edited by williswires; 05-30-2011 at 11:55 PM. Reason: added comment to jc505
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Old 05-30-2011, 11:16 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jc505 View Post
It was going to completely remove the outlet, replace it with an on/off switch with a weatherproof on/off faceplate, run the cable underground and install an electrical box on my back wall which will house the CFGI outlet with an in-use weatherproof box over the outlet.
I'm kindof confused about whether you are keeping a receptacle at the existing spot and adding another one at the end of your 40' extension. Hopefully you are keeping one at the back of the house, since there should be one each on the front and back sides of the house per code.

Can you change to a 2-gang box at the house? Replace your existing receptacle with a GFCI receptacle. Feed your new circuit from the GFCI. The outlet you put out away from the house would be protected and wouldn't have to be another GFCI.

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Last edited by williswires; 05-30-2011 at 11:26 PM.
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