Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-13-2010, 02:14 PM   #1
LML
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2
Share |
Default

old lamp--wire question


hi all--first time post!

I have this cool old desk lamp, and the switch was becoming intermittent so I took it apart--the bad way

as I unscrewed things, the wires disconnected before I could see how they were originally attached, and I'm a bit puzzled by what appear to be the connection points

I've attached an image--any tips much appreciated on how to attach these things.

Also--I've been reading that the neutral wire should be identified by some ridges or another marking, and I can't find anything on my cord, except a continuous seam along one of the sides--and I doubt this is what I'm looking for...


Thanks!

LML
Attached Thumbnails
old lamp--wire question-wire-diagram-sm.jpg  

LML is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2010, 04:22 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Springfield OH
Posts: 764
Default

old lamp--wire question


I don't see any clue how they attach. Perhaps the other half is more telling?

Regarding which-to-which, I prefer positive (line, power, ungrounded conductor, etc..) to the center tab. This appears to be the top connection on the picture. Putting power on the center tab reduces accidental chance of shock, in my mind. Do you have a voltmeter to identify the hot conductor?

Sometimes wires include markings on one conductor to differentiate it from the other. If you can find the conductor that attaches to the wider blade of your plug, you have found the neutral (grounded conductor, I think they call it). The other one should be the supply.

oberkc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2010, 05:23 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Western Maine
Posts: 201
Default

old lamp--wire question


Quote:
Originally Posted by oberkc View Post
Regarding which-to-which, I prefer positive (line, power, ungrounded conductor, etc..) to the center tab. This appears to be the top connection on the picture. Putting power on the center tab reduces accidental chance of shock, in my mind.
This isn't a matter of preference, and isn't just in your mind. Code defines this. Center terminal is hot. End of story.



As stated, identify the wider blade of the plug, that goes to the outer terminal.



I'd say your socket came apart in a way that rendered it fubar. You need a new one.
emolatur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2010, 05:38 PM   #4
Electrical Contractor
 
kbsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Delmarva
Posts: 3,360
Default

old lamp--wire question


Quote:
Originally Posted by LML View Post
...Also--I've been reading that the neutral wire should be identified by some ridges or another marking, and I can't find anything on my cord, except a continuous seam along one of the sides--and I doubt this is what I'm looking for...


Thanks!

LML
That is EXACTLY what you are looking for when identifying the neutral conductor. A continuous ridge on the outside of the conductor!!

That wire would connect to the outer shell of a lamp socket.


I believe that those wires were originally spot-welded or soldered somehow to the brass strips inside of that socket.
__________________
-KB

Life is uncertain -- eat dessert first!!
kbsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2010, 07:13 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,842
Default

old lamp--wire question


According to your picture, the top metal strip is hot, the bottom metal strip is neutral.

A switch built into the socket bridges the top strip with the middle strip. The middle strip touches the bottom of the light bulb.

You may be able to solder the wires onto the metal strips (at the spots where your yellow arrows touch) but you need to be careful that the strip with the blob of solder still fits in the socket and you don't melt the plastic socket shell while soldering.

Better quality sockets have a metal shell into which the bulb screws, rather than the plastic threaded area.
__________________
Stop wasting time re-adjusting the pattern. Have several lawn sprinklers, one for each pattern.

Last edited by AllanJ; 11-13-2010 at 07:17 PM.
AllanJ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 12:36 PM   #6
LML
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2
Default

old lamp--wire question


great responses--thanks everyone


this cord has a plug w/ identical prongs, so I can't use that for identifying the wires (and I don't have a tester) but the seam on the cord sounds like the indicator I am looking for

will have to dig out my soldering iron sounds like

LML
LML is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 12:51 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Springfield OH
Posts: 764
Default

old lamp--wire question


If you plug has identical prongs, then it is not polarized, and it probably matters not which wires go where. The proper polarization of your socket would be based on which way it is plugged in, which is a 50/50 chance it is wrong.

You may want to consider replacing the plug as well, it is pretty inexpensive insurance against a potential shock.

oberkc is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electric Wire question Mr Big Electrical 8 05-04-2010 02:01 PM
HALP! Master/Remote Dimmer troubles! Confuserated Electrical 9 02-12-2010 03:30 PM
Important Wire Nut and Electrical Tape Question Wolfies167 Electrical 22 01-06-2010 12:59 PM
Please Help with Outdoor Lamp/ Sensor hcjoak09 Electrical 2 12-16-2009 10:49 PM
hooking up dryer....bronx ny code SURFBUG Appliances 6 10-14-2008 09:41 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.