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Old 02-17-2012, 08:23 PM   #46
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit
In this case 250A would flow for one cycle or so of 60 Hz until the CB tripped.
What?? I said properly installed and properly operating.

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Old 02-17-2012, 08:25 PM   #47
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


An appliance with the hot connected to the ground will cause a heavy current to flow for a short period.
Right?
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Old 02-17-2012, 08:26 PM   #48
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit
An appliance with the hot connected to the ground will cause a heavy current to flow for a short period.
Right?
Not necessarily...did you see my light bulb example above?
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Old 02-17-2012, 08:31 PM   #49
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


Yes, the filament limits the current to reasonable values.

It is not usually said that "the hot is connected to the neutral" if a filament, resistor, motor, inductor, capacitor or other reasonably high impedance intervenes.
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Old 02-17-2012, 08:39 PM   #50
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit
Yes, the filament limits the current to reasonable values.

It is not usually said that "the hot is connected to the neutral" if a filament, resistor, motor, inductor, capacitor or other reasonably high impedance intervenes.
I don't disagree. I know that it is not usually said as such. But, nobody can deny that energized conductors are in fact electrically connected to "ground". It's a strange concept.
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Old 02-17-2012, 08:47 PM   #51
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


If it's a circuit then every circuit node is connected to every other node.

For house wiring a reasonable 120v load is 8 ohms (or less for short periods, like a welder) and a half-ohm or more for long periods is a "short." The long period and the short period depend on the CB's trip curve.
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Old 02-17-2012, 10:43 PM   #52
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jlmran View Post
But, in properly connected and properly operating 120v devices, the hot is always connected to ground.
Well not really. The hot is connected to the load and the load is connected to the grounded conductor.
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:24 PM   #53
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ohms at 110 outlets with the CB open?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jlmran View Post
I don't disagree. I know that it is not usually said as such. But, nobody can deny that energized conductors are in fact electrically connected to "ground". It's a strange concept.
Well an energized conductor is just that ,a conductor.
Untill its physically conected through a load you can have no connection to neutral or ground without what I refer to as the big bang theory!

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