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-   -   Official List of 2011 NEC changes? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/official-list-2011-nec-changes-91291/)

WaldenL 01-04-2011 12:50 PM

Official List of 2011 NEC changes?
 
I know there's Scuba_Dave's sticky about possible changes, but is there an official document somewhere which describes the actual final changes between 2008 and 2011. Is that included in the 2011 Handbook version? Specifically all I care about is residential changes, don't really care about 600V stuff. :-)

Jim Port 01-04-2011 02:40 PM

EC and M magazine and Mike Holt both typically have a Changes to the 20xx NEC that is published. You may be able to se if the articles are posted on the ECM magazine website.

WaldenL 01-04-2011 02:44 PM

Thanks for the EC&M reference. Found this on their site: http://ecmweb.com/nec/2011-nec-changes-20101101/

Jim Port 01-04-2011 02:53 PM

Here is a link to Mike Holts book

http://www.mikeholt.com/productitem....=All&type=Book

gregzoll 01-04-2011 06:00 PM

Jim, I can understand the placing of GCFI outlets, so they are not behind vending or refers, which finally makes sense, but the part that I am scratching my head on, is if you replace a outlet, you now have to install a ACFI breaker, or did I miss something on that part.

Jim Port 01-04-2011 08:14 PM

Thats my take on it too Greg, if a receptacle needs to be replaced and a new install would require AFCI protection you will need to add the AFCI protection, and TR also.

Supposedly they are AFCI receptacles coming. Either way this is going to turn a simple replacement into a much more expensive repair. And that doesn't account for any troubleshooting that may be required to clear wiring faults that only become evident after the AFCI installation. No mention of what will happen on MWBCs.

gregzoll 01-04-2011 08:47 PM

Looks like with MWBC's, they clarified with shared Neutrals. On the note of clearing faults, that was always fun in the Navy when working on shipboard electrical systems, when they messed up the navigation and communication systems after the yards got done cutting circuits, when pulling the wrong cables.

Saturday Cowboy 01-04-2011 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 562996)
Thats my take on it too Greg, if a receptacle needs to be replaced and a new install would require AFCI protection you will need to add the AFCI protection, and TR also.

Supposedly they are AFCI receptacles coming. Either way this is going to turn a simple replacement into a much more expensive repair. And that doesn't account for any troubleshooting that may be required to clear wiring faults that only become evident after the AFCI installation. No mention of what will happen on MWBCs.

I would argue that the changes do not apply to replacement of faulty plugs but to circuit additions or extendtions.

sirsparksalot 01-05-2011 12:10 AM

AFCI requirements are for bedrooms only, correct? And if so, why?

Saturday Cowboy 01-05-2011 03:19 AM

no. AFCI almost everywhere, except where GFI. the thinking is to reduce fires

gregzoll 01-05-2011 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saturday Cowboy (Post 563131)
no. AFCI almost everywhere, except where GFI. the thinking is to reduce fires

That was pointed out with the use of ACFI protected circuits in manufactured mobile homes & motor homes. But what is going to stop bubba from doing what he/she already has been doing forever with wiring stuff up out of code in their mobile home.

Jim Port 01-05-2011 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saturday Cowboy (Post 563065)
I would argue that the changes do not apply to replacement of faulty plugs but to circuit additions or extendtions.

This is from the EC&M link above. This covers the formerly simple receptacle replacement.

406.4(D) Receptacle Replacements

A new requirement addresses the replacement of receptacles in areas requiring AFCI protection, tamper-resistant receptacles, or weather-resistant receptacles.
406.4 General Installation Requirements.
(D) Receptacle Replacement.
(4) Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters. Effective Jan. 1, 2014, where a receptacle outlet is supplied by a branch circuit that requires arc-fault circuit-interrupter protection [210.12(A)], a replacement receptacle at this outlet must be one of the following.
(1) A listed (receptacle) outlet branch-circuit type arc-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle.
(2) A receptacle protected by a listed (receptacle) outlet branch-circuit type arc-fault circuit-interrupter type receptacle.
(3) A receptacle protected by a listed combination type arc-fault circuit interrupter type circuit breaker.
(5) Tamper-Resistant Receptacles. Listed tamper-resistant receptacles must be provided where replacements are made at receptacle outlets that are required to be tamper-resistant elsewhere in this Code.
(6) Weather-Resistant Receptacles. Weather-resistant receptacles must be provided where replacements are made at receptacle outlets that are required to be so protected elsewhere in the Code.
Analysis: As aging wiring systems become more of a concern in the electrical industry, the Code is taking a proactive approach to providing protection of these systems. Many areas of a dwelling require the use of AFCI protection in an effort to help avoid electrical fires. When AFCIs were first introduced into the NEC, the substantiation for their inclusion was based largely on electrical fires in older homes. With the inception of these devices, the Code began protecting new and future wiring systems but didnít address the older ones that contained many of the fires discussed in the AFCI arguments. This change expands the AFCI requirements to older homes. Because these older homes often donít contain an equipment grounding conductor, installation of an AFCI circuit breaker does very little in the way of protecting the branch circuits. The receptacle-type AFCIs also provide a significantly lower level of protection, but they will be required, nonetheless.
This requirement has an effective date of Jan. 1, 2014.
The 2008 NEC introduced the concept of tamper-resistant receptacles in dwelling units. The requirements of that section (406.11, now 406.12) apply to new installations. It could have been argued that one could install tamper-resistant receptacles in the locations required by 406.11, then remove them and replace them with traditional receptacles. While most people will agree that this argument is a huge stretch of the imagination, this change eliminates the issue before it arises. It also requires that, on existing dwelling units, any receptacles that are replaced will need to be replaced using tamper-resistant receptacles.
A similar change was made for weather-resistant receptacles, using the same logic as tamper-resistant receptacles.

Saturday Cowboy 01-08-2011 01:08 PM

I stand corrected-THANKS


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