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Old 04-07-2007, 08:36 AM   #1
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Number of circuits needed for a small kitchen? All responses welcome!


Hello all,

I'm remodeling a small kitchen (~ 60 sq ft), but I'm striving to make up for the small size with functionality. With the exception of the range, I'm talking about 15 amp circuits here. The finished kitchen will have:

- a range (stove / oven) - dedicated circuit already in use.
- a fridge - dedicated circuit already in use
- a microwave over the range - with fan/vent system and a light underneath
- a 24" DW
- a food disposer
- three receptacles along the counter (the head of the circuit already has a GFCI, and another receptacle is already in place - but I will be adding another (adding a 4th in such a small kitchen seems overkill and there's really no space for it))
- ceiling lighting - circuit is already in use
- some lighting installed under the wall cabinets and over the counter

I was told by an electrician that the microwave should have a dedicated circuit. You agree? So what about the DW and the disposer .... can those be on the same circuit? Or should those be dedicated too?

So in a nutshell ....

1) is it generally acceptable to add a 3rd receptacle to the GFCI protected circuit that will feed small appliances at the counter?

2) does the microwave really need a dedicated 15 amp circuit?

3) can the DW and the disposer share a 15 amp circuit? Of course, I'll have to wire it so a switch controls the disposer and the DW always has power.

4) what circuit should the should the lighting under the wall cabinets be on?

All responses are welcome. If you agree with a previous response, please say so ... that way I can tally the opinions.

Thanks!

Alex

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Old 04-07-2007, 08:57 AM   #2
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Number of circuits needed for a small kitchen? All responses welcome!


Where do you live. It sounds like this is a question for canadian electrical code.

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Old 04-07-2007, 09:40 AM   #3
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Number of circuits needed for a small kitchen? All responses welcome!


Thanks for your reply
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Old 04-07-2007, 10:23 AM   #4
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Number of circuits needed for a small kitchen? All responses welcome!


Living in the US you can forget about the 15 amp circuit.
Kitchens require a min. of 2 small appliance 20 amp circuits circuits.
What kind off undercabinet light are you using? If hard wired add them to the overhead lights. Microwave, fridge on dedicated circuits. Dw and
disposer can share a circuit.
All countertop receptacles have to br gfci protected
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Old 04-07-2007, 10:31 AM   #5
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Number of circuits needed for a small kitchen? All responses welcome!


Unless local code in your area modifys the national code, (you should check, it is possible) you have not asked all the right questions.

Let me fill you in on some things, so that you can re-think your questions.

A kitchen is required to have two or more 20 amp small appliance branch circuits feeding the kitchen counter tops. (I once did a kitchen that had only one 2 foot wide counter top and I had to install 2 recs there on two different circuits to satisfy the inspector) These two or more circuits must also feed the required recs in the kitchen, dining, pantry, and breakfast nook. (if you have those)

There are exceptions for appliances that are fastened in place. They must be each on another appliacne circcuit, except that you may put the fridge on one of the two SABCs. So the micowave, the dishwasher and the disposal need to be on at least another circuit. The amp draw of these will probably not allow you to put them all three on the same circuit. Keeping in mind that you can only load these fastened in place appliance circuits to 80 percent you are limited to 12 amps on a 15 amp circuit and 16 amps on a 20 amp circuit.

Most of the time this is accomplished by putting the microwave on its own circuit, and the dish and disposal on one or two more circuits depending on the amp draw of each.

The lights for the kitchen may not be on any of the circuits mentioned above. So the best thing to do is to put them on one of the other lighting circuits for the house (if amperage allows) or add lighting circuits for them.
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Old 04-07-2007, 10:38 AM   #6
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Number of circuits needed for a small kitchen? All responses welcome!


[quote=alexz;39923]
- a range (stove / oven) - dedicated circuit already in use.
good


- a fridge - dedicated circuit already in use
good


- a microwave over the range - with fan/vent system and a light underneath
Needs its own 15 or 20 amp circuit depending on its amp draw

- a 24" DW
- a food disposer
One or two 15 or 20 amp circuits, depending on amp draw

- three receptacles along the counter (the head of the circuit already has a GFCI, and another receptacle is already in place - but I will be adding another (adding a 4th in such a small kitchen seems overkill and there's really no space for it))
Existing counter top circuit needs to be upgraded to 20 amps. At least one of the reces serving the counter top needs to be on a different counter top circuit.

- ceiling lighting - circuit is already in use
Good

- some lighting installed under the wall cabinets and over the counter
Can be on with the lights currently serving the kitchen if amp draw allows.


1) is it generally acceptable to add a 3rd receptacle to the GFCI protected circuit that will feed small appliances at the counter?

There is no limit to the number of recs on this circuit. As I said above there must be at least 2 circuits feeding all of the counter top recs.

2) does the microwave really need a dedicated 15 amp circuit?

Normally Yes

3) can the DW and the disposer share a 15 amp circuit? Of course, I'll have to wire it so a switch controls the disposer and the DW always has power.

They can be if amp draw allows. The dw should be plugged into a rec that is located in the cabinet directly next to the dw. The gd should be plugged into a switched rec.

4) what circuit should the should the lighting under the wall cabinets be on?

Any 15 or 20 amp general purpose lighting circuit.

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