Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-10-2011, 03:47 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 66
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Northeast flooding


Hi I am an industrial electrician in an area hit hard by flooding , so of course everyone calls me and ask what to do with the electrical box. I personally would replace any breaker under water at the least. I was wondering what are your thoughts.

Jj375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2011, 04:02 PM   #2
Electrician
 
SD515's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Near Jackson Michigan Area
Posts: 1,450
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


Tough call. To err on the side of safety, I’d say yes, replace the panel and breakers. On the other hand, I’ve seen panels and breakers submersed and dried out with no ill effects. Much of it depends on what is in the water that is getting deposited onto the panel and parts. As you may know, pure water is neither conductive nor corrosive. It’s the garbage in the water that cause conductivity and corrosion.

__________________
Kyle

Just because you can, doesn't always mean you should
SD515 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2011, 05:21 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 66
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


It's river water so it's going to be corrosive. Plus lots of mud left everywhere. I agree replace is the safest bet. It's hard to explain to people though it might work now. It could not work tomorrow.
Jj375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2011, 05:31 PM   #4
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,593
Rewards Points: 20
Default

Northeast flooding


NEMA has a good paper on water damaged equipment. you can google for it, but it recommends replacement.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Jim Port For This Useful Post:
SD515 (09-10-2011)
Old 09-10-2011, 06:10 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 66
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


Thanks I just read it and it sums it up pretty good.
Jj375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2011, 06:22 PM   #6
Electrician
 
SD515's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Near Jackson Michigan Area
Posts: 1,450
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jj375 View Post
It's river water so it's going to be corrosive. Plus lots of mud left everywhere.
Good to know Michigan isn't the only place with dirty rivers
Did I just say that?
__________________
Kyle

Just because you can, doesn't always mean you should
SD515 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2011, 06:51 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 66
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


It's pretty bad mud sewage heating oil good mix plus a high iron content from all the mines.
Jj375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2011, 07:29 PM   #8
Member
 
Code05's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Easton MD
Posts: 1,841
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


Link for future readers.

http://www.nema.org/stds/water-damaged.cfm
Code05 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Code05 For This Useful Post:
SD515 (09-10-2011)
Old 09-10-2011, 08:21 PM   #9
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,593
Rewards Points: 20
Default

Northeast flooding


Quote:
Originally Posted by Code05 View Post
Thanks for posting that link. I did not have time to look it up. Trying to get yard work done while it wasn't raining for a change.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 05:59 AM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


There are bound to be all sorts of opinions on this, and recommendations. Then there's the NEC. My experience with our old (100A) electrical panel was that these things will take a lot of water. Our service was above ground, entering the house about 12-15 feet up, and for some reason, if a bad thunderstorm blew the rain against that side of the house, water would literally POUR out of the panel in the basement. Weatherhead on the thing must have been bad, I dunno. Anyway, that happened several times, and nary a breaker tripped. When we finally had to move to a 200A panel about 6 years ago (and we buried the service, so the water issue is gone), a lot of those breakers (C-H) were moved over. I've only had one of that batch fail outright, a 30A dual breaker to the oven.
rico567 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 07:05 AM   #11
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,593
Rewards Points: 20
Default

Northeast flooding


The trouble is that you don't know if the potentially damaged equipment will trip when you need it to trip.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 05:50 PM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Northeast flooding


I get your point.....but circuit breakers are the type of mechanism that's just a "black box" to the homeowner anyway. The only way we have to test the breaker is to deliberately overload the circuit, and how many people are going to do that?
rico567 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 08:43 PM   #13
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,593
Rewards Points: 20
Default

Northeast flooding


That is why it is easier to just replace them.

__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Flooding in Wood Foundation mhp8982 Building & Construction 14 03-09-2011 01:15 PM
How do I Prevent Flooding KerryA. Building & Construction 8 11-16-2009 04:16 PM
Is having a sump pump an indication that the basement has a flooding problem? MCK Plumbing 7 08-24-2009 08:57 AM
Low-E in the Northeast. Clutchcargo Building & Construction 11 10-28-2008 07:34 AM
Help with serious flooding problem MNUZZI Landscaping & Lawn Care 12 10-03-2008 02:46 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.