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Old 04-25-2010, 07:13 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
ultimate_balanc, I understand you want to learn about this, but this is not your basic install. This is a very weird situation.

The problem is you are not listening to the folks who are trying to help you. They are trying to help you not kill yourself or create a hazardous condition.

You obviously have no idea what you are doing, yet you insist on trying to convince everyone to tell you what you want to hear.

Tell your buddy that this cannot be done. Tell him not to be a slumlord and get an actual professional in there to make it right. I truly do not understand why this is a problem.
Ditto.

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Old 04-25-2010, 07:16 AM   #17
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Your electrician can construct a portable subpanel with a cord that plugs into the single 240 volt receptacle. It will have breakers sized for the attached receptacles that appliances plug into.

This way you are not altering the electrical system in the apartment.

If either of the appliances has a 4 prong plug (separate neutral and ground) then the circuit receptacle must also have been 4 prong, and the neutral and ground of course kept separate throughout the subpanel assembly.

The portable subpanel may be a misfit for the receptacle in that the combined loads fed by the subpanel exceed the capacity of the circuit, but in general, the feed to a subpanel (or to a main panel for that matter) does not accommodate the total load, operating simultaneously, that may be connected to that subpanel.
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Originally Posted by ultimate_balanc View Post
Okay, so if my breaker set has a free slot for another 240v, ... How do I tell the 110v slot apart from the 240v slot, in the breaker?
One slot in a panel provides 110 volts. Two slots next to each other generally provide 240 volts; you use a two-breaker unit that occupies both slots and with both handles tied together. (Not all possible slot pairings give 240 volts; your landlord's electrician may have to reposition other breakers to free up a slot pair that does.)
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Last edited by AllanJ; 04-25-2010 at 07:41 AM.
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Old 04-25-2010, 07:45 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
Your electrician can construct a portable subpanel with a cord that plugs into the single 240 volt receptacle. It will have breakers sized for the attached receptacles that appliances plug into.

This way you are not altering the electrical system in the apartment.

If either of the appliances has a 4 prong plug (separate neutral and ground) then the circuit receptacle must also have been 4 prong, and the neutral and ground of course kept separate throughout the subpanel assembly.

The portable subpanel may be a misfit for the receptacle in that the combined loads fed by the subpanel exceed the capacity of the circuit, but in general, the feed to a subpanel (or to a main panel for that matter) does not accommodate the total load, operating simultaneously, that may be connected to that subpanel.

One slot in a panel provides 110 volts. Two slots next to each other generally provide 240 volts; you use a two-breaker unit that occupies both slots and with both handles tied together. (Not all possible slot pairings give 240 volts; your landlord's electrician may have to reposition other breakers to free up a slot pair that does.)
Where can you show us that a 'portable sub-panel' is an NEC compliant installation.
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Old 04-28-2010, 09:03 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
Your electrician can construct a portable subpanel with a cord that plugs into the single 240 volt receptacle. It will have breakers sized for the attached receptacles that appliances plug into.

This way you are not altering the electrical system in the apartment.

If either of the appliances has a 4 prong plug (separate neutral and ground) then the circuit receptacle must also have been 4 prong, and the neutral and ground of course kept separate throughout the subpanel assembly.

The portable subpanel may be a misfit for the receptacle in that the combined loads fed by the subpanel exceed the capacity of the circuit, but in general, the feed to a subpanel (or to a main panel for that matter) does not accommodate the total load, operating simultaneously, that may be connected to that subpanel.

One slot in a panel provides 110 volts. Two slots next to each other generally provide 240 volts; you use a two-breaker unit that occupies both slots and with both handles tied together. (Not all possible slot pairings give 240 volts; your landlord's electrician may have to reposition other breakers to free up a slot pair that does.)
Thanks, I really appreciate your input.

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