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Old 05-13-2013, 03:08 PM   #1
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New property.....electric to the back?


The wife and I are about to buy 10 acres which will require getting electricity from the front of the property to the back.

I am looking for ideas for best way to accomplish this, as I would like to have power (100 amp service for RV plus work area/shop) about 750 feet toward the back of the property. I will pay to have the meter and panel installed at the front.....then take it from there.

Above ground or below....if I am doing it myself? I will check price to just have the power run back there initially.....but then would want to have electric up front as well.

More information.....I am in Texas....Leon County is location of property. Any help is appreciated....
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Old 05-13-2013, 03:57 PM   #2
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New property.....electric to the back?


Put the service in the middle, 750' is way to long for secondary conductors....
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Old 05-13-2013, 03:59 PM   #3
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New property.....electric to the back?


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about 750 feet toward the back of the property. I will pay to have the meter and panel installed at the front.....
I'm no expert, but a back-of-the-envelope calculation says that a 200A service that's 750 feet long will experience considerable voltage drop which will require rather fat (and therefore very expensive) cables. I'm guessing it will be far cheaper to have the POCO run high voltage to the back of your property and install a transformer there to step down to 240V near your home, then run a small branch circuit to the front of the property.
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Old 05-13-2013, 04:45 PM   #4
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Put the service in the middle, 750' is way to long for secondary conductors....
Was thinking the same....so, service in the middle. I should not have any worries with running the 300' or so either direction myself then?

Thanks for the quick replies....
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Old 05-13-2013, 04:46 PM   #5
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New property.....electric to the back?


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Was thinking the same....so, service in the middle. I should not have any worries with running the 300' or so either direction myself then?

Thanks for the quick replies....
300' is still pretty long, but a lot less cheaper than going the whole 750'. The utilities around here will only go 150' secondaries when they are responsible.
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Old 05-13-2013, 05:57 PM   #6
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New property.....electric to the back?


Southwire's calculator says that for 3% voltage drop on a 350' run with 100A load, you would need 750kcmil aluminum or 400kcmil copper conductors. That's huge. You really may want to look into having two services, with the POCO running primary in between.
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Old 05-13-2013, 05:58 PM   #7
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Southwire's calculator says that for 3% voltage drop on a 350' run with 100A load, you would need 750kcmil aluminum or 400kcmil copper conductors. That's huge. You really may want to look into having two services, with the POCO running primary in between.
Without any ACTUAL load specs, i'd say he is fine, most people couldn't afford a 100 amp electric bill.... i'm willing to bet 250's AL. would suffice, of course, this is speaking blindly without load specs, but if we are talking the average house... i'd say i'm pretty close.


Of course, two services is the best solution if at all possible.
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:01 PM   #8
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New property.....electric to the back?


How much power (amps) do you need at the front of the property? Or, what do you need to power there? Light, welder, etc?
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:26 PM   #9
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call the POCO they will help you engineer this.
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:09 AM   #10
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New property.....electric to the back?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Southwire's calculator says that for 3% voltage drop on a 350' run with 100A load, you would need 750kcmil aluminum or 400kcmil copper conductors. That's huge. You really may want to look into having two services, with the POCO running primary in between.
I use that one too ... for calulations .. but i got >>>


1 conductors per phase utilizing a #750 Aluminum conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.95% or less when supplying 100.0 amps for 750 feet on a 240 volt system.

or >>>


1 conductors per phase utilizing a #400 Copper conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.95% or less when supplying 100.0 amps for 750 feet on a 240 volt system.
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Old 05-14-2013, 01:25 PM   #11
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New property.....electric to the back?


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I use that one too ... for calulations .. but i got >>>


1 conductors per phase utilizing a #750 Aluminum conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.95% or less when supplying 100.0 amps for 750 feet on a 240 volt system.

or >>>


1 conductors per phase utilizing a #400 Copper conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.95% or less when supplying 100.0 amps for 750 feet on a 240 volt system.
That's because you used 240V. It's actually two 120V runs! If you do the calc using 240V, then the voltage drop observed on the 120V loads can be up to 6% if the load is not symmetrical between the hot legs.
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Old 05-14-2013, 01:29 PM   #12
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New property.....electric to the back?


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Without any ACTUAL load specs, i'd say he is fine, most people couldn't afford a 100 amp electric bill.... i'm willing to bet 250's AL. would suffice, of course, this is speaking blindly without load specs, but if we are talking the average house... i'd say i'm pretty close.


Of course, two services is the best solution if at all possible.
The average load is certainly much less than 100A. But it's the peak load that matters for voltage drop calculations. What happens when the AC starts up? Do the lights blink and the computers reboot?
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:32 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Southwire's calculator says that for 3% voltage drop on a 350' run with 100A load, you would need 750kcmil aluminum or 400kcmil copper conductors. That's huge. You really may want to look into having two services, with the POCO running primary in between.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
That's because you used 240V. It's actually two 120V runs! If you do the calc using 240V, then the voltage drop observed on the 120V loads can be up to 6% if the load is not symmetrical between the hot legs.
My answer is correct .... and it is the SAME. 120v or 240 volts ..

next you used 350' and the OP stated 750' ..

750kcmil aluminum or 400kcmil copper conductors, 120v or 240v, 350' or 750 '

but the answer is still the same any way you slice it ..
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:26 PM   #14
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New property.....electric to the back?


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The average load is certainly much less than 100A. But it's the peak load that matters for voltage drop calculations. What happens when the AC starts up? Do the lights blink and the computers reboot?
My lights blink when my ac starts up and i'm pretty close to the transformer, you cannot avoid undersized transformers, the utility rolls that way.
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