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Dorado 03-18-2013 05:16 PM

New/old construction low voltage brackets
 
Just a complaint about the term...

I wish they'd use terms for low voltage brackets that describe how they're built and not assume everyone would use "new construction" brackets for new construction. If you're making a receptacle sized hole in the wall, what's the big deal about making it 3/4" wider so you could attach the bracket to a stud to make it stronger? You could use a chisel to cut the drywall that's over the stud.

My case is a little more complex because I think I have wire mesh and bracing, and the bracing is narrower and thicker than a steel stud, but the plaster may be thick enough so I could screw a new construction bracket into the mesh after chipping away some plaster.

stickboy1375 03-18-2013 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dorado (Post 1140251)
Just a complaint about the term...

I wish they'd use terms for low voltage brackets that describe how they're built and not assume everyone would use "new construction" brackets for new construction. If you're making a receptacle sized hole in the wall, what's the big deal about making it 3/4" wider so you could attach the bracket to a stud to make it stronger? You could use a chisel to cut the drywall that's over the stud.

My case is a little more complex because I think I have wire mesh and bracing, and the bracing is narrower and thicker than a steel stud, but the plaster may be thick enough so I could screw a new construction bracket into the mesh after chipping away some plaster.

What the heck are you talking about?

Techy 03-18-2013 06:27 PM

'Old work' items can in most cases be installed without patching the finished wall, and do not require an adjacent stud

'New work' items require a stud, and patching of existing finishes

Dorado 03-18-2013 06:38 PM

Yeah, new work brackets in old walls require patching, but if you're installing low voltage brackets, I think you can handle a small patch. I found a new construction bracket with three tabs instead of two, for "extra secure mounting." If two aren't always strong enough, it makes me wonder why I should try an even weaker old work bracket.

stickboy1375 03-18-2013 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dorado (Post 1140302)
I don't think new work items always require patching. They just require a fastener driven into a stud, usually. If the wall is solid concrete it wouldn't even need a stud, and I think the mesh in my wall would work with the right fastener. To confuse things more, I found a new construction bracket with three tabs instead of two, for "extra secure mounting." If two aren't always strong enough, it makes me wonder why I should try an even weaker old work bracket.

I've been in the trade a long time and have never had an issue with either new work devices, or old work... not really sure what you are trying to do.

Dorado 03-18-2013 06:49 PM

Sorry...I edited my post since you replied...I just want to install a low voltage ring and discovered my choices and I was wondering why I shouldn't choose the strongest. My local big box store doesn't carry new work low voltage rings and I have to go out of my way to get them. I think they're under appreciated.

stickboy1375 03-18-2013 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dorado (Post 1140314)
Sorry...I edited my post since you replied...I just want to install a low voltage ring and discovered my choices and I was wondering why I shouldn't choose the strongest. My local big box store doesn't carry new work low voltage rings and I have to go out of my way to get them. I think they're under appreciated.

Heres a little tip for you, just nail a plaster ring to the stud, no box.


http://media.toolking.com/catalog/pr...Mud_Ring_1.jpg

k_buz 03-18-2013 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dorado (Post 1140302)
Yeah, new work brackets in old walls require patching, but if you're installing low voltage brackets, I think you can handle a small patch. I found a new construction bracket with three tabs instead of two, for "extra secure mounting." If two aren't always strong enough, it makes me wonder why I should try an even weaker old work bracket.

Then patch the freaking thing and quit making a big deal about nothing. There are umpteen million different versions of low volt mounts out there. Just because the big box store you went to only had a couple types, doesn't mean that manufacturers have to change the way they name their products. Sheese.

stickboy1375 03-18-2013 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1140317)
Then patch the freaking thing and quit making a big deal about nothing. There are umpteen million different versions of low volt mounts out there. Just because the big box store you went to only had a couple types, doesn't mean that manufacturers have to change the way they name their products. Sheese.

Or learn how to install them... lol...

Dorado 03-18-2013 06:58 PM

My local big box store has those plaster rings, but I don't have space for it.

stickboy1375 03-18-2013 06:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dorado (Post 1140320)
My local big box store has those, but I don't have space for it.

You really are confusing me.... why not just post a picture of what you did.

Dorado 03-18-2013 07:22 PM

2 Attachment(s)
I'm installing jacks in a new hollow wall, shown in red. Maybe in an old wall later on. The spacing is tight but I can do it as long as I don't use the big plaster rings.

k_buz 03-18-2013 07:33 PM

http://www.legrand.us/~/media/BEA5B8...bc=ffffff&as=1

Use something like this and you will only have one ring to cut in.

Dorado 03-18-2013 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1140347)

Use something like this and you will only have one ring to cut in.

I know, but I actually don't want two keystone plates. I want one keystone and one telephone. I just didn't buy the telephone plate yet. I want one label for each of the two coax plugs, so I'll use keystone for that. Then I want a real phone jack next to it. I don't think they make a real keystone telephone jack. I'd have to get an extra wide jack, whatever it's called, and put the phone plug in the center. That could be confusing, especially to a future tenant, and residential telephone repair people may not do keystone.

k_buz 03-18-2013 07:54 PM

I'm not even going to try to explain. You go with your plan.


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