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kailor 12-01-2010 10:57 AM

New to the Forum; First Post
 
Hello all! This is my first post of many to come. I'm a fairly handy DIY'er. These internet forums are so helpful in learning and saving money, but most importantly, making well-informed decisions. Well, so much for blowing sunshine!

I'm installing a mobile home on some property I own. Here's the skinny:
Feeder wire is aluminum 4/0, 4/0, 2/0, #4.
240v single-phase
Service load in the mobile home is 200A.

The Voltage Drop Calculators on the internet seem to vary between each one. Keeping the voltage drop less than 3%:

Q: What is the max distance that I can run the feeder wire (I will NOT be upsizing or downsizing this feeder wire) from the service pole without the lights blinking everytime the heat or AC comes on? What would be the max distance that you as a professional would run if this was your project to obtain proper electrical service?

Q: Code here in North Alabama requires schedule 40 gray PVC conduit when above ground. What size diameter conduit should I use or should I just go with direct burial when below ground?

kailor 12-01-2010 06:14 PM

Bump.

bob22 12-01-2010 06:37 PM

I'm no electrician, but at:
http://www.electrician2.com/calculat...culatoradv.htm
putting in values I assumed, I came up with 2.8% drop at 160 feet.
You could play with that calculator til you come up with 3.0% or 2.9999% etc.. There may be other issues that a pro will know about v drop outside of length effects (if any).

kailor 12-01-2010 07:51 PM

Thanks for the reply Bob. Hopefully some pros will offer some inputs on the optimum length.

kailor 12-02-2010 07:02 PM

Anybody?

LyonsElecSupply 12-02-2010 09:25 PM

Rule of thumb (and from experience from working with it) for your conduit is 2.5" MINIMUM.

Also as far as the light "blinking" when AC comes on, keep in mind that AC motors have relatively high start up loads (150% to 200% running amps) So lights dimming is relative to the incoming voltage from the POCO. Theres no easy way to prevent this.

Rob's Electric 12-03-2010 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kailor
Hello all! This is my first post of many to come. I'm a fairly handy DIY'er. These internet forums are so helpful in learning and saving money, but most importantly, making well-informed decisions. Well, so much for blowing sunshine!

I'm installing a mobile home on some property I own. Here's the skinny:
Feeder wire is aluminum 4/0, 4/0, 2/0, #4.
240v single-phase
Service load in the mobile home is 200A.

The Voltage Drop Calculators on the internet seem to vary between each one. Keeping the voltage drop less than 3%:

Q: What is the max distance that I can run the feeder wire (I will NOT be upsizing or downsizing this feeder wire) from the service pole without the lights blinking everytime the heat or AC comes on? What would be the max distance that you as a professional would run if this was your project to obtain proper electrical service?

Q: Code here in North Alabama requires schedule 40 gray PVC conduit when above ground. What size diameter conduit should I use or should I just go with direct burial when below ground?

At 3% the calculation I use would be 180 ft. Depending on type of aluminum feeder wire, I normally use URD. 2" minimum. Any motor load will dim lights for a second due to inrush current draw.


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