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Old 12-12-2012, 08:44 PM   #1
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I'm replacing my old meter housing with a combo unit (meter/breakers) Since I just bought the house and the meter had been pulled, I wanted to make sure I was up to code when the electric company comes back out to put power on the house. I currently have only one grounding rod and I am told I need two. (I believe this is for NEW construction, but will check this out with electric company.) Anyway these two rods are supposed to be six feet apart. How deep does the copper wire connecting these rods have to be?

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Old 12-12-2012, 08:49 PM   #2
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The wire can be on top of the ground, but I put it about 6/8" under ground.

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Old 12-12-2012, 08:53 PM   #3
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Make sure your meter combo is on the power company list of approved equipment.

Make sure the top of the rods are at grade or below.
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Old 12-13-2012, 09:08 AM   #4
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Unless it's a local thing, there is no NEC requirement for two ground rods. I built my house three years ago, and I have only one ground rod.

The test equipment necessary to determine if the resistance to ground is acceptably low (<25 ohms I think) is quite expensive. Using two grounds rods is deemed an acceptable alternative.
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Old 12-13-2012, 10:05 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by md2lgyk
Unless it's a local thing, there is no NEC requirement for two ground rods. I built my house three years ago, and I have only one ground rod.

The test equipment necessary to determine if the resistance to ground is acceptably low (<25 ohms I think) is quite expensive. Using two grounds rods is deemed an acceptable alternative.
Your post is a little misleading the way in which it is worded.

There is a requirement for a second ground rod if you are not able to prove the resistance of the single rod is less than 25 ohms.
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Old 12-13-2012, 04:13 PM   #6
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Your post is a little misleading the way in which it is worded.

There is a requirement for a second ground rod if you are not able to prove the resistance of the single rod is less than 25 ohms.
No intent to be misleading. You are quite correct. But I don't think it's the homeowner's responsibilty to prove the resistance of one rod is acceptable. If the inspector doesn't have access to the proper equipment, they simply require two rods or just let it go. I don't know which applies in my case. I only know that I have just one rod.
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Old 12-13-2012, 05:56 PM   #7
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How far from the foundation should the grounding rods be?
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Old 12-13-2012, 06:17 PM   #8
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No intent to be misleading. You are quite correct. But I don't think it's the homeowner's responsibilty to prove the resistance of one rod is acceptable. If the inspector doesn't have access to the proper equipment, they simply require two rods or just let it go. I don't know which applies in my case. I only know that I have just one rod.
It is the homeowner or contractor responsibilty to show that a the resistance with 1 ground rod is 25 ohm or less and a 2nd ground rod is not needed.
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Old 12-13-2012, 06:30 PM   #9
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How far from the foundation should the grounding rods be?
Bang them in 2' away from house, where they used fill.Look for other utilities,though.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:27 AM   #10
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It is the homeowner or contractor responsibilty to show that a the resistance with 1 ground rod is 25 ohm or less and a 2nd ground rod is not needed.
And it says this where? Not ragging on you, just curious. I would argue that as a homeowner, it's not my responsibility to prove anything - it's the inspector's to verify things are done correctly whether they be electrical, plumbing, or anything else. How rigorous he wants to be is up to him.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:33 AM   #11
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No, whom every does the work would need to prove they did it to code.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:58 AM   #12
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No, whom every does the work would need to prove they did it to code.
Not to split hairs, but I must disagree. It is the inspector's job to verify that work is to code. I shouldn't have to "prove" the 20-amp circuits use 12 AWG romex; he can look at them for himself if he so chooses. That's his job, after all. Nor should I have to "prove" my drain piping has the proper slope. He can look at them himself if he so chooses. If he asks me if I used joist hangars on my deck and I tell him I did, that doesn't "prove" anything. If he wants to verify, he can crawl under it and look.

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Old 12-14-2012, 09:37 AM   #13
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The contractor would need to test to see or prove that the second rod was needed. Given the cost of the equipment and the time it takes to test it is more expedient to drive the second rod and be done with it. No need to prove anything and the inspector can easily see both rods.

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