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Old 09-04-2008, 06:48 AM   #16
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


I will tell you exactly what i would do. Just like speedy says.

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Old 09-04-2008, 06:53 AM   #17
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Or you can leave the panel alone and run a 60A branch circuit to the kiln.

This is my pick.
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Old 09-04-2008, 05:00 PM   #18
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


I second Speedy's suggestion. Is this the plug on the kiln?
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Old 09-04-2008, 06:44 PM   #19
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


You'll have to dumb it down a notch. What is a branch circuit?

The plug is similar to that picture, but the two rectangular ones are the same size and the other one is a circle.
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Old 09-04-2008, 06:55 PM   #20
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


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Originally Posted by ekulrenlig View Post
You'll have to dumb it down a notch. What is a branch circuit?

The plug is similar to that picture, but the two rectangular ones are the same size and the other one is a circle.
A branch circuit is just a circuit run from the breaker panel to an outlet.
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Old 09-04-2008, 08:04 PM   #21
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


Ok. That sounds relatively easy, and cheaper than what I was thinking. Would a branch circuit be up to code and everything, as long as it is done correctly? Do I need to worry about overloading my breaker box, when I have the kiln running?

My mistake...the rectangular prongs on the plug are different sizes, but the ground is circular.
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Old 09-17-2008, 09:59 PM   #22
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


Alright, I've got some more questions about this.

I need to know what size/type of wiring I need to run a 60 amp branch circuit to the kiln. The cable on the three prong plug is labeled with "6 AWG 2/C 8 AWG 1/C TYPE ST 105 C."

The kiln is 42 amps, 10.1 kw, and I'll need to run about 85-90' of wire. All the online wire gauge calculators I've found, have said that #8 wire will do. Is this correct?

Also, the main wire to the subpanel breaker box in the garage (40 amp main) is labeled "ESSEX 8-3G NONMETALLIC SHEATHED CABLE TYPE NM-B 600V." Would this wire work for my kiln?
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Old 09-17-2008, 10:11 PM   #23
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


No, 8 gauge wire would inadequate for this application. 8 Gauge is only rated for 40 amps (Romex/NM). For your existing sub panel in the garage this is fine, but the kiln requires more power than your sub panel can provide. Your branch circuit is going to be a 60 amp circuit and the breaker must be rated to both protect the wire and support the load. 6 gauge copper wire should be adequate, though considering the load and the distance you may need to bump up one more wire gauge to deal with voltage drop. One of the more experienced electricians on here will chime in and let you know if 4 guage would be required; I don't have a voltage drop calculator handy at the moment.
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Old 09-17-2008, 10:30 PM   #24
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


Voltage drop isn't an issue, it's only around 1.5%.
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Old 09-19-2008, 07:18 PM   #25
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


The branch circuit will run right past the sub panel in the garage. Would it be possible to update the main amperage in the subpanel. It is currently 40 amps. Could I put a 100 amp breaker in the main panel in the house and run that to the subpanel and put a 100 amp main breaker there? And then run a 60 amp circuit from the sub panel? What size wire would I need to support 100 amps?
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Old 09-20-2008, 05:19 AM   #26
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


You should condersering the cost of #6-2W/G romex cable .,, Yes some big box store will stock this and make sure you remarked the white wire with red or bleu marker so you know this is a hot conductor.,,

The 6-2W/G is plenty fine and it will only have 1.5% voltage drop on that distance.

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The branch circuit will run right past the sub panel in the garage. Would it be possible to update the main amperage in the subpanel. It is currently 40 amps. Could I put a 100 amp breaker in the main panel in the house and run that to the subpanel and put a 100 amp main breaker there? And then run a 60 amp circuit from the sub panel? What size wire would I need to support 100 amps?
No because if you want increase the size of the wire from 40 amp rating to 100 amp and with that kind of distance the cost of wire will add up fast and also I do not know if your subpanel do have 100 amp rating or not.,,

If you go that route.,, with attached garage it will be far much cheaper and easier to string out 6-2W/G Romex than try to pull out new wires for 100 amp capicty which the wire size will be much larger you will need to run #2 copper* or 1/0 AL wires* Just compare the cost per foot and it will add up fast.


* note becarefull depending on which code cycle you are in it will really can change a bit especally true if you are on 2008 NEC code cycle.


Merci,Marc
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Old 09-28-2008, 10:57 AM   #27
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


Is #6-2W/G NM-B Romex rated for 105 degrees C? The cord on the kiln says 105 degrees C, is it important to get a wire rated for that, or will 90 degrees C be adequate?

Also, the kiln draws 10.1 KW. The #6-2W/G NM-B Romex that I am finding is rated for 600 volts??

Somebody please tell me exactly what wire I need to do this.

Last edited by ekulrenlig; 09-28-2008 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 09-28-2008, 11:09 AM   #28
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


6/2NM cable.
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Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
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Old 09-28-2008, 11:30 AM   #29
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


The 600 volt rating is a maximum, anything less is OK.

I'd use 6/2 as well.

Rob
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Old 08-12-2011, 10:54 PM   #30
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Need to wire in appliance 240 volts, 42 amps


I recently purchased a used Duncan LT-4K kiln, model DK820-2. Printed on the kiln is 45amps 60hz. Im going to put it in my detached garage that has its own breaker box. What gauge wire will support this kiln, and what amperage do I need in order to support it?

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