Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-03-2011, 10:56 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
Share |
Default

Need whole new electrical system


If you ever did a whole system or have extensive knowledge, please help me.

We have a warehouse/office that was a victim of theft. Worst part is the crooks went after the electrical wiring! So it looks like all, or at least most of the wiring is gone. Also the electrical box was damaged(not sure why they did that). I am no electrician but I am assuming we need to start from zero as everything is either gone or damaged(plus the electricial system is over 50 years old.

Before we start asking for quotes from various companies, I want to arm myself with questions I should ask. What kind of system should I ask for?What information should I provide. What is the general process of something like this(warranty, timeflow, etc). What sort of scams should I look out for.

About the building:
6000 sq.ft.
Wood structure
Mostly office but one section is dedicated for heavy equipments(table saws, compressors, lifts, etc).

I know this isn't much information but please provide any information. Will start making calls tomorrow.

peequi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2011, 11:30 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 38
Default

Need whole new electrical system


Quote:
Originally Posted by peequi View Post
If you ever did a whole system or have extensive knowledge, please help me.

We have a warehouse/office that was a victim of theft. Worst part is the crooks went after the electrical wiring! So it looks like all, or at least most of the wiring is gone. Also the electrical box was damaged(not sure why they did that). I am no electrician but I am assuming we need to start from zero as everything is either gone or damaged(plus the electricial system is over 50 years old.

Before we start asking for quotes from various companies, I want to arm myself with questions I should ask. What kind of system should I ask for?What information should I provide. What is the general process of something like this(warranty, timeflow, etc). What sort of scams should I look out for.

About the building:
6000 sq.ft.
Wood structure
Mostly office but one section is dedicated for heavy equipments(table saws, compressors, lifts, etc).

I know this isn't much information but please provide any information. Will start making calls tomorrow.

To clarify, do you still have the power meter and service-feeds going into the panel?

The first question would be what service you get from the power company (e.g. 200AMP, 500 AMP).

How big was the original panel? Was there just one panel?

Most of the wiring stuff is pretty standard for lighting and receptacles, but most likely a machine-shop would have it's own panel, and often would require 220V power for some equipment. Also, things can get tricky depending on how it's heated/cooled and where that equipment is located, etc.

Depending on the quality and condition of what wiring is there, more of it may be usable than you think.

Robo_geek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2011, 11:47 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
Default

Need whole new electrical system


Good question, meter and service feed looks fine(they are located high up so I don't think they were harmed).

Not sure what service I am getting, probably will need to make a call for that one.

There was 2 panels....to be honest I don't know why. Maybe 1 panel was dedicated to the machines?
peequi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2011, 02:48 AM   #4
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 2,544
Default

Need whole new electrical system


Your first task will be to do a load calculation, or have one done for you. This will require that you know what equipment will be used in the building, where, and how. Gathering that information is the first step in determining what you'll need. Electricians can do this sort of load calculation, but in some jurisdictions it will have to be done by an engineer in order to get your building permit. You'll have to have this information before you can get a cost estimate or even a rough design of the new electrical system. Assuming you don't have any really power-intensive equipment in the shop area (electric ovens, huge welders, etc.), you will probably end up with just two panels again, one for the office and one for the shop. One may be a subpanel of the other, or they may both be fed from disconnects near the meter. Whoever does the load calculation can also design the system. This is a fairly simple electrical system, so the design should not be a big deal and may not even require engineering approval depending on your local rules. If you are having multiple contractors bid the project, I would suggest giving them all the load calcs and list of requirements and letting them each design the system as they choose. This is more likely to get you the least expensive solution. Alternatively you may have the system designed by one electrician or engineer (probably not for free) and provide that plan to multiple contractors to bid. That gets you the most parity between the bidders.

Once you have selected a contractor, they will pull the necessary permits and go to work. You'll need to coordinate their work with the other subcontractors who will be involved (drywall, painting, etc.). The easiest way to do that is to let the electricians finish most all of their work before bringing in the other trades. Let them tell you when they're ready for drywall. Make sure you have the other trades ready to come in and finish up, since this can really delay your project. This will not be the most time-efficient scheduling, but it's the easiest thing to do for someone who's not used to acting as a general contractor.

Considering the amount of damage involved here and the fact that your business is shut down until it's fixed, you might consider choosing a single electrical contractor based on reputation alone (ask around and get really solid advice), and giving it to them on a negotiated contract. The terms would probably be cost-plus with a guaranteed maximum price and savings split. Include very specific scheduling terms. You might want to consider a liquidated damages provision for late completion (though this will be hard to negotiate on a project this size, and may increase the price too much), or a bonus provision for early completion. By turning them loose to get the job done on terms that favor fast and efficient work, you'll get your business up and running as soon as possible. That would be my approach. This will not be the least expensive solution. You'll pay a premium of 10-20% if you go this route, but it will be worth it in increased quality of work, completion speed, and an improved working relationship with the contractor. There's a reason most large commercial jobs are done this way instead of hard-bid these days - businesses have recognized the value of negotiating a solution with the BEST contractor instead of the cheapest.

...and, um, yeah, I was a commercial construction manager for awhile, in case that doesn't show. :-)

Last edited by mpoulton; 05-04-2011 at 02:54 AM.
mpoulton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Upgrade old Rheem Split System fredm54 HVAC 7 05-15-2012 02:04 PM
Burnham Series 2 Cast Iron Radiator System SybrDave HVAC 2 12-10-2009 05:24 AM
Electrical box replace,addiitions, city permits and looking for an electrician ramchy Electrical 3 08-02-2009 11:12 AM
Size A/C system properly 70stang HVAC 1 03-26-2006 07:22 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.