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HotTommy 02-11-2009 08:53 PM

Need help wiring old 220v fan motor
 
I want to use the 220v fan assembly from a 1970s vintage electric furnace to provide ventilation in my workshop. A photo of the wiring diagram inside the old furnace is at the end. As I read it, there are six wires to the motor. White and brown wires connect to a large capacitor like device. I need to know where to connect the red, black, blue and yellow wires to get a single speed (high) fan I can control with a simple on/off switch. In other words, I need to know where to connect the two hots, neutral and the ground from my shop wiring. The applicable wiring diagram is the third from the left and is outlined in red. The arrow points to the model number 320-960D. Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3363/...132def.jpg?v=0

KE2KB 02-11-2009 10:16 PM

The drawing is unreadable. I copied it into Adobe Photoshop, enlarged the hell out of it, and I still couldn't read it well enough to be able to offer any help based on it.

Maybe try Googling the make and model and see what you get?

FW

Stubbie 02-11-2009 10:25 PM

Connect L1 to Black (high speed). The capaciter has both the common (c) for the mains winding and brown for the start winding the single wire coming from the fuse block to the capaciter will be your L2.

HotTommy 02-11-2009 10:35 PM

OK, here's another photo of the wiring diagram. I can't get much better because my camera's focus won't let me get closer. But I can email you the photo so you can see it better than on the web hosting site.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3316/...16d58f.jpg?v=0

HotTommy 02-11-2009 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stubbie (Post 229010)
Connect L1 to Black (high speed). The capaciter has both the common (c) for the mains winding and brown for the start winding the single wire coming from the fuse block to the capaciter will be your L2.

I don't know what L1 and L2 are. Explain please.

Stubbie 02-11-2009 10:57 PM

Your fan is 240 volt (you said it was) you will have 3 wires the hots are L1 and L2 and you will have a ground wire. Be sure the motor is 240 volt and not 120 volt it could be either but the diagram your showing is 240 volt.

HotTommy 02-12-2009 06:51 AM

Let me say this back to be sure I've got it right. One hot wire will go to the capacitor. The other hot wire will go to the black wire on the motor. The neutral wire will go to the capacitor. One white wire from the motor will go to the neutral fitting on the capacitor. One brown wire from the motor will go to the hot fitting on the capacitor. (In other words, the brown and black wires from the motor will go to the hot wires, the white wire from the motor will go to the neutral and the capacitor will be wired in parallel with the motor). The remaining red, blue and yellow wires from the motor will not connect to anything. Is that right?

Stubbie 02-12-2009 08:32 AM

Yes except the white is not a neutral. It is just the common hot for the motor windings when the start winding is energized and the main winding is energized. The start winding will be removed from the circuit by a centrifugal switch inside the motor when it gets up to speed. 240 volt needs no neutral only 120 volt loads need it.

If you look at the diagram a low voltage relay closes a contact to energize one hot line to the motor and start it. You will need a switch that will manually or other wise do the same thing. The circuit is from black through the white to the other line hot once the brown is out of the loop.

If the motor was 120 volt the black would be your neutral and the hot going to the capacitor would be your ungrounded conductor. Then the common would connect to your speed wire. A neutral would not connect to a capacitor.

HotTommy 02-15-2009 02:20 PM

I didn't fully understand Stubbie's above post, but I tried wiring the fan according to my last post above. When I switched the power on, the fan started and ran quietly. When I shut off power to the hot line going to the capacitor/brown wire to the motor, the fan immediately jumped to a much higher speed. If I reconnect that hot line, the fan again slows. If I disconnect power to the hot line connected to the black wire on the motor, everything stops. This makes me think the fan motor runs better on 110 volts than on 220 volts. I'm confused and Stubbie's explanations are little above me. Can someone offer a explanation/suggestion about wiring this motor?

ctsmiths 02-15-2009 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HotTommy (Post 230748)
I didn't fully understand Stubbie's above post, but I tried wiring the fan according to my last post above. When I switched the power on, the fan started and ran quietly. When I shut off power to the hot line going to the capacitor/brown wire to the motor, the fan immediately jumped to a much higher speed. If I reconnect that hot line, the fan again slows. If I disconnect power to the hot line connected to the black wire on the motor, everything stops. This makes me think the fan motor runs better on 110 volts than on 220 volts. I'm confused and Stubbie's explanations are little above me. Can someone offer a explanation/suggestion about wiring this motor?

You have the wires jumped wrong, Can you get a bigger and clearer pic than what you have? of the print.

ctsmiths 02-15-2009 03:12 PM

From what I can see I belive you need to wire the brown & black together and to one side of the 240, the white & blue together, and then only the red to the other side of the 240. You also need a 2 pole single throw motor switch for this so it only comes on with 240 and breaks both lines when off. Again this is only going by the print you have posted and its hard to read no guarantees. :)

ctsmiths 02-15-2009 03:13 PM

The yellow could either be capped or tied to the red im not sure.

HotTommy 02-15-2009 04:44 PM

ctsmiths -

Thanks for taking time to reply.
Tommy

Yoyizit 02-15-2009 04:48 PM

I Thought L1 and N and L2 are 120v and neutral (0v) and 120v with 240v from L1 to L2.

Stubbie 02-15-2009 05:48 PM

Ok I thought you understood but I guess I misunderstood that you did.The wiring diagram is for 240 volt motor.

Black = High Speed
Blue = Meduim speed (cap this wire off it is unused)
Yellow = Medium low (cap this wire off it is unused)
Red = Medium (cap this wire off it is unused

Connect the black (high speed) to one hot wire

There is a white wire coming from the motor it is common and goes to the main run winding. At the capacitor this wire is connected on a spade with another wire this other wire is your other hot wire.
On the other side of the capacitor is the brown it goes to the motor start winding.

For a 240 motor the windings are in series not parallel. Parallel is for 120 volt motors.

A centrifugal switch in the brown wire (inside the motor)will take that series circuit out when it opens after the motor gets up to a certain rpm then the white coming from the motor connected to the capacitor with the other hot wire becomes your series run circuit at high speed....clear??

You keep mentioning 220 and 120 and neutrals so what does the motor nameplate say??

Furnace blower motors are one or the other.. most are 120 volt but there are 230 volt models also. It would be extremely uncommon for the motor to be dual voltage rated for a furnace application.

Maybe you could post a diagram of how you wired it and we can give you the corrections.

If you connect all those other speed wires in any way you will burn your motor up and it will be toast. When you install the furnace it is usually wired medium. If you want to change speed you disconnect the medium speed from the hot and reconnect to the speed wire you want as identified on the diagram. It really is easy to see it on the diagram. You never change the wiring at the capacitor.


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