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coyote556 08-03-2007 02:48 AM

Need help picking an outdoor enclosure
 
Does anyone make an outdoor enclosure for this application? What I want to do is run 4/0 aluminum wire from a 200 amp disconnect on the pole, below my meter, to the side of my house, underground. Once I reach the house, I would like some kind of enclosure where I could have a hub and run the 4/0AL into it and run two separate feeds of #1 copper out of it. In other words, there would be the 4/0, 4/0, 2/0 coming into the enclosure and 6 separate copper feeds coming out. These would be split, 3 and 3, into those "d" 90 degree fittings and go directly into the back of my two, preexisting load centers. I really donít want another set of breakers in the outdoor enclosure, but I also do not want to do two separate 150 foot runs of cable from the disconnect at the pole, to these load centers. The preexisting load centers are not large enough to sub one off the other, so I thought this idea would work out. I would like some sort of hub enclosure. Does anyone have any ideas?

The current set up has the run from the 200a disconnect, below the meter, running aerial to a jump pole, then to my weather head. Just before that run goes into the weather head, it has splices, where each of the three aluminum runs are split into two copper runs. Those runs go down the conduit from the weather head, where all 6 go into load center #1. There is rigid conduit between the two load centers. Three of the runs go into load center #1 and make an immediate right turn, where they run through the conduit and feed load center #2.

Thanks


:huh:

SecretSquirrel 08-03-2007 08:00 AM

Hoffman makes corrosion resistant enclosures. You have to decide if you want stainless, aluminum, polycarb, or fiberglass.

Ilsco makes the power distribution block. There's a multitude of other manfs. that make these as well.

These components can be ordered through your local electrical distributor or perhaps through the internet.

Someone a little more code savy than I will have to address as to whether this concept is permittable

Note: I totally revised my response as the original was a little "overdone". My apology if you saw the original.

JohnJ0906 08-03-2007 04:53 PM

Do the 2 existing panels have main breakers, and, if so, what size?

It sounds as if the #1 cu taps will be fairly short. Will they be in conduit, and will they be less than 10 feet?

coyote556 08-04-2007 04:09 PM

The two existing panels have main breakers, 150a each, but they will both be pulling from the 200a main disconnect at the pole. Load calculations show it should never be pulling the 200a max with the two panels added together. The split runs of #1 copper will definately be less than 10 feet, probably more like less than three feet and they will be in conduit.

MechanicalDVR 08-04-2007 11:28 PM

Why not just use a weather proof trougth?

coyote556 08-05-2007 06:53 PM

would that hold the distribution block?

SecretSquirrel 08-05-2007 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coyote556 (Post 56292)
would that hold the distribution block?

No it wouldn't but I think what DVR had in mind would be to use some split bolts to tie all the wiring together and that could be done in a trough with rubber tape and Scotch33 tape. The problem I have with that is DIRECTLY connecting the copper and aluminum together. The distribution block is suitable for cu/al. If you go with the split bolts then you need to use that aluminum antioxidizing compound... and the name of that stuff escapes me at the moment. If properly done it should be allright and less expensive but someone else that has recent experience with it that should be able to offer their opinion.

JohnJ0906 08-05-2007 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SecretSquirrel (Post 56294)
aluminum antioxidizing compound... and the name of that stuff escapes me at the moment.

No-lox, De-ox, there are several brand names.

coyote556 08-05-2007 08:56 PM

when you are talking about the weatherproof trough, are you talking about split bolting everthing together and putting the splices in one of thoses buriable boxes?? will that last?? thanks

SecretSquirrel 08-05-2007 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coyote556 (Post 56306)
when you are talking about the weatherproof trough, are you talking about split bolting everthing together and putting the splices in one of thoses buriable boxes?? will that last?? thanks

No, not buried... basically a section of wireway with smaller dimensions than the enclosures that I linked you earlier.

See http://www.hoffmanonline.com/product...59&itemID=3182

This (the trough) is very well suited for lugging the wires together. If you want to use a distribution block you'll need an enclosure because it will have a back panel that can be drilled and tapped for the mounting of the dist. block.

coyote556 08-05-2007 10:19 PM

So if I understand correcty, that would go on the back of the residence, with couduit going in from the underground and conduit coming out going to the panels? The split bolt splices would be inside and I would insulate them with shrink tube or similar?

SecretSquirrel 08-05-2007 10:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coyote556 (Post 56318)
So if I understand correcty, that would go on the back of the residence, with couduit going in from the underground and conduit coming out going to the panels? The split bolt splices would be inside and I would insulate them with shrink tube or similar?

Yes, essentially... except you would wrap the splices (joints) with rubber electrical tape then some Scotch33 or equivalent and don't forget the antioxidizing compound. I would recommend at least the 6" wide trough as that will allow you some room to maneuver in. You'll also need some Myer's hubs for the conduit connections to insure weather tightness. You may need to have grounding bushings on the conduit connections (Myer's hubs) if the conduit is metallic and a grounding lug on the trough itself. Perhaps Electrician John or another qualified contributor could weigh in on that and any other critical components and/or wiring methods necessary to meet code.

coyote556 08-06-2007 05:11 PM

is the main advantage to the trough, over an enclosure, the cost factor? could I drill the back of the trough with a hole saw and run ridgid conduit out of the back of it, directly into the panels? thanks again for all the help with this. you guys have been great.

SecretSquirrel 08-06-2007 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coyote556 (Post 56412)
is the main advantage to the trough, over an enclosure, the cost factor? could I drill the back of the trough with a hole saw and run ridgid conduit out of the back of it, directly into the panels? thanks again for all the help with this. you guys have been great.


The trough would be a little less expensive, a few bucks, but remember you're not buying the distribution block which probably costs almost as much as the enclosure. You'll have to cost it out for an accurate assesment. As far as coming into the back of the trough, you'll have to make sure whatever you do is weather tight plus allow enough room (trough depth) for the bending radius of the wire as it'll have to make a sharp 90 degree turn upon its entrance into the trough.


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