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Old 12-18-2010, 01:04 PM   #1
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Need help converting my 220v to 110v on wall...


Hello i'm a total electrical noob! i some 220v running in my basement for dryers and hottub that i don't need and could use more 110v. the dryer is your standard 4 plug receptical in the wall. then i have a big flat wire running from breaker to outside for a hot tub that is no longer there. i'm fairly sure the breaker for that is turned off otherwise i have live wires in my yard YIKES!. so i killed the main and disconnected the wires in the basement where the flat wire (from outside) was running into a box connecting to the wire running to breaker, i recap'd the wires in the box and carefully closed it up and restored the power all seems well. ( Was 4 big fat wires: red black white and copper)
Now my question is... can i somehow get 110v plugs attached to one of these places? and is what i've done safe with my hot tub wires? thanks for any input anyone may have!

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Old 12-18-2010, 01:10 PM   #2
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Need help converting my 220v to 110v on wall...


If you have four wires coming from the panel, and the breaker is a proper two pole breaker, then you can use it as a multi-wire branch circuit. The voltage between each hot wire and the neutral is 120 volts.

You said the wires were fat. That implies the breaker might be 30 or 40 amps. If you want to put normal outlets on there, you need to lower the breaker to 20 amps. It's OK to use the larger wire with a 20 amp circuit, but you might need to pigtail it down to 12 gauge with a proper splice/wire nut because normal 15/20 amp outlets usually won't take larger than 10 gauge wire.


Oh BTW, make the first outlet a GFCI for outdoor outlets. Wire the rest of them on the "LOAD" side of that GFCI. If you use both sides of the MWBC you need two GFCIs one for each leg.


Last edited by Gigs; 12-18-2010 at 01:15 PM.
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Old 12-18-2010, 01:22 PM   #3
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Need help converting my 220v to 110v on wall...


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Originally Posted by chroniclivin View Post
Hello i'm a total electrical noob! i some 220v running in my basement for dryers and hottub that i don't need and could use more 110v. the dryer is your standard 4 plug receptical in the wall. then i have a big flat wire running from breaker to outside for a hot tub that is no longer there. i'm fairly sure the breaker for that is turned off otherwise i have live wires in my yard YIKES!. so i killed the main and disconnected the wires in the basement where the flat wire (from outside) was running into a box connecting to the wire running to breaker, i recap'd the wires in the box and carefully closed it up and restored the power all seems well. ( Was 4 big fat wires: red black white and copper)
Now my question is... can i somehow get 110v plugs attached to one of these places? and is what i've done safe with my hot tub wires? thanks for any input anyone may have!

It sounds like your old hottub feed went from the main panel to a junction box and then out into the backyard? If you still have a feed running from the main panel to that junction box, I'd shut off that breaker in the panel, otherwise you still have hot wires in that junction box. You could go a full step further and remove the feed between the junction box and the main panel, or you could use that junction box to create a multiwire branch circuit.

When using a double-pole breaker to create a multi-wire branch circuit, you must use a 20A double-pole breaker with a tie-bar (if one pole trips due to an overload, the other pole must trip, also). Also, you must use pigtails on all neutral connections on the circuit. If you "daisy-chain" the neutral through receptacles, and one of the receptacles fails, there is potential for 240V on a single receptacle.
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