Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-16-2009, 09:57 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Share |
Default

NEC check


can someone tell me if everything of the folloing is up the NEC:
This is a third apartment on the thrid floor
Let me know what you guys think of this And if you see and code blunders
BR 1] (AFCI protected)
I have a bedroom with 5 outlets and a swith and light- another outlet dediated for AC.
Outside:
220 line running to outside for Air Conditioning unit

Bathroom:
with 1 GFCI outlet and 1 light
Bedroom 2 (AFCI protected)
5 outlets and a light
Kitchen/pantry/ living room(AFCI protected)
1 small appliance branch for the pantry which has 2 outlets
1 small appliance branch for the kitchen outlets
dedicated dishwasher outlet
Living room :
6 outlets(inluding stove and hood) and a light
/countertop outlets 24 inch apart- general outlets 6ft apart/
oh and by the way, everything is on a 20 amp fuse with a 12/2 bx

bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 08:28 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 272
Default

NEC check


  • You don't mention any GFCIs for the kitchen countertop receptacles. Any receptacle serving a kitchen countertop or that is within 6 ft of the outer most edge of a sink in a laundry, utility, or wet bar area also requires ground-fault protection. 2008 NEC 210.8(A)(6 and 7)
  • You need a receptacle for that open wall space near the pantry area - any wall space 24" or wider requires a receptacle so that no point along the wall space is more than 6' away (measured horizontally along the floor line). 2008 NEC 210.52(C)(1).


willis

__________________
Willis
williswires is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 09:46 AM   #3
Electrical Contractor
 
kbsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Delmarva
Posts: 3,368
Default

NEC check


You need at least 2 small appliance circuits for the receptacles serving the kitchen counter-top areas.
__________________
-KB

Life is uncertain -- eat dessert first!!
kbsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 01:12 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

NEC check


Does the pantry have a counter?
If so then that can be considerd part of the kitchen
In that cas eif it has a seperate circuit serving only that counter it could count as the 2nd required kitchen small appliance circuit
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 05:47 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


Quote:
Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
You need at least 2 small appliance circuits for the receptacles serving the kitchen counter-top areas.
do i need the two small appliance circuits in the kitchen specifically. Or can I have them in the kitchen and then in the pantry like i have? And of course all the kitchen outlets are going to be GFCI
bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 05:48 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


Quote:
Originally Posted by williswires View Post
  • You don't mention any GFCIs for the kitchen countertop receptacles. Any receptacle serving a kitchen countertop or that is within 6 ft of the outer most edge of a sink in a laundry, utility, or wet bar area also requires ground-fault protection. 2008 NEC 210.8(A)(6 and 7)
  • You need a receptacle for that open wall space near the pantry area - any wall space 24" or wider requires a receptacle so that no point along the wall space is more than 6' away (measured horizontally along the floor line). 2008 NEC 210.52(C)(1).


willis
THANK YOU!!! i completly over looked that wall!
bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 05:53 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

NEC check


Quote:
Originally Posted by bobward View Post
do i need the two small appliance circuits in the kitchen specifically. Or can I have them in the kitchen and then in the pantry like i have? And of course all the kitchen outlets are going to be GFCI
If the pantry has a matching counter to the kitchen then it may be considered part of the kitchen & that may meet code. Might be the Inspector's call

If the pantry has a door to enter, then it will not count
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 06:16 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
If the pantry has a matching counter to the kitchen then it may be considered part of the kitchen & that may meet code. Might be the Inspector's call

If the pantry has a door to enter, then it will not count
Thank you. It will have a matching counter. The spaces blend together, I hope that it will fly with the inspector, dont see why not. I will look through the book to see if there are any definitions for "pantry"
bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 06:22 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

NEC check


What I would do is run (at least) one outlet to the kitchen counter from the pantry circuit
Then you are covered
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 06:39 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,294
Default

NEC check


I love the dollar sign as the switch symbol

I occaisionally draw them that way to get a rise out of customers.
220/221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 06:42 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
What I would do is run (at least) one outlet to the kitchen counter from the pantry circuit
Then you are covered
Thank you greatly! What I will do is put the outlet where the refridgerator is going to be plugged into on it as well.. I believe the code extends rights to refriderators being plugged into the small appliance branch
bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 07:30 PM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


ok this is my updated drawing
bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 07:35 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

NEC check


I'm pretty sure you need the 2nd circuit actually on the counter top, not just the fridge
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 08:03 PM   #14
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


hmmm in that case, i guess ill go the trusty 12/3 way and just do every other on lets say black and the remaining on red. this way both branches are present everywhere
bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 10:33 PM   #15
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 15
Default

NEC check


or i might just extend the refridge outlet to one of my counter top outlets

bobward is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
check valve question burr HVAC 3 11-30-2008 10:03 AM
Sewage Lid + check valve majorchamp Plumbing 2 07-07-2008 10:06 AM
Question about sump pumps and check valves lennyseleven Plumbing 3 11-08-2007 10:33 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.