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Old 12-09-2009, 05:13 PM   #1
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Multiple Panel Question


So I have 3 total panels in my laundry/utility room. Panel "A" is the Main Panel (150 amp), Panel B is the 100 amp sub panel directly to the left of the main panel, connected directly to the main panel with a 2 1/2" short nipple and #2 wire. Panel C is a 100 amp sub panel sub metered (meter in-line with the power feed to Panel C) this panel is fed from the main panel (A) with a 60 amp breaker and #2 wire as well (future ability to upgrade to 100 amp to panel C).

In short, 2 sub panels B, and C are directly connected to the main panel via thier own conduits.

What I'd like to do, I have an outdoor outlet out front physically connected into panel B, but need to electrically connect it into Panel C for the KWH monitoring just for my Holiday Lights. This would be a temporary thing (seasonal) and the rest of the year it would be on its own breaker in Panel B. I was thinking of connecting Panel B and C together with a length of 3/4" conduit to pass the wires between the two panels just for this one circuit (effectively creating a conduit loop between all 3 panels).

I know that if this is acceptable that the neutral and the hot for this circuit must be connected in the panel that serves it (so I will pass both a neutral and the hot through the 3/4" interconnecting conduit) but does the ground need to be connected to the same panel or can it stay connected in Panel B? Panel B and C connect to the main panel via PVC conduit, but have 4 wires (HHNG) and no the neutral bar is NOT bonded to the panel.

My initial thought is yes this is ok, but I figured i'd check here to see what others had to say about this.

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Old 12-11-2009, 03:58 PM   #2
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Multiple Panel Question


Anyone in the field have an opinion on this, other than physically moving the one circuit from panel B to panel C?

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Old 12-11-2009, 05:14 PM   #3
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Multiple Panel Question


Sems like a lot of effort just to monitor your christmas light operating costs.

I wouldn't be concerned about the ground coming from another source.


What's the problem with just leaving it on C?
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Old 12-11-2009, 08:47 PM   #4
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Multiple Panel Question


Well the Outlet connects into panel B right now, but needs to connect to panel C for the sub-metering. I ran a 50 amp 240 line to the front yard intended for use with an outdoor portable sub panel, but I never got around to putting it together this year (I have all the parts and boxes). My current draw on this one outlet out front with everything on that's connected to it, is about 16-17 amps so it really depends on what my display includes next year if I'll even need the 50 amp panel.

I ran the 240volt line in preparation for the Christmas display this year, since I was remodeling the basement and had the perfect opportunity to run the wire and put it in. I had all the walls and ceiling opened up and the run ended up being about 35-40 feet once everything was connected.

Right now I temporarily just have a wire hanging out one panel into the other and would really like to close the panels up at some point (this is all in a corner so it doesn't see a lot of high traffic).
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Old 12-11-2009, 10:26 PM   #5
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Multiple Panel Question


I would just go ahead and run hot and neutral from the receptacle to the desired panel, going through existing and/or new nipples and conduits and going through other panels if needed to get there. The receptacle's ground wire (grounding conductor) would be run to the first panel ground bus bar it reached.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 12-11-2009 at 10:32 PM.
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Old 12-12-2009, 06:26 AM   #6
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Multiple Panel Question


Quote:
Originally Posted by theatretch85 View Post
So I have 3 total panels in my laundry/utility room. Panel "A" is the Main Panel (150 amp), Panel B is the 100 amp sub panel directly to the left of the main panel, connected directly to the main panel with a 2 1/2" short nipple and #2 wire. Panel C is a 100 amp sub panel sub metered (meter in-line with the power feed to Panel C) this panel is fed from the main panel (A) with a 60 amp breaker and #2 wire as well (future ability to upgrade to 100 amp to panel C).

In short, 2 sub panels B, and C are directly connected to the main panel via thier own conduits.

What I'd like to do, I have an outdoor outlet out front physically connected into panel B, but need to electrically connect it into Panel C for the KWH monitoring just for my Holiday Lights. This would be a temporary thing (seasonal) and the rest of the year it would be on its own breaker in Panel B. I was thinking of connecting Panel B and C together with a length of 3/4" conduit to pass the wires between the two panels just for this one circuit (effectively creating a conduit loop between all 3 panels).

I know that if this is acceptable that the neutral and the hot for this circuit must be connected in the panel that serves it (so I will pass both a neutral and the hot through the 3/4" interconnecting conduit) but does the ground need to be connected to the same panel or can it stay connected in Panel B? Panel B and C connect to the main panel via PVC conduit, but have 4 wires (HHNG) and no the neutral bar is NOT bonded to the panel.

My initial thought is yes this is ok, but I figured i'd check here to see what others had to say about this.
I'm not sure exactly how you intend to wire this but i would say no.
As in no way no how. This is a very bad idea. and for the cost you can get a little plug in ammeter to measure your draw.

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