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Old 02-03-2012, 01:03 PM   #1
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I am in the middle of remodeling my house and living in it at the same time. The front half of the roof is done now but the back half requires the service drop to be moved from its current attachment point to a new mast. The roof will be rebuilt from the top plate up. I need to keep my electric operational during this lengthy activity. I want to run the new service into a new 200A panel then move circuits over from the old Pushmatic at my leisure. I am looking for feasability here. Part of the issue is the old panel and new panel will be in almost the same spot. The other is, how can I temporarily keep my old panel hot until all the circuits are moved over to the new one. My first thought on this is to pull the old panel and meter box off the wall and let them hang by the wires. Once the new panel is in and connected I run a temporary connection to the old panel from the main lugs in the new box. (old meter box gone) This would a short term thing. Is this completely retarded?
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Old 02-03-2012, 01:55 PM   #2
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I am in the middle of remodeling my house and living in it at the same time.....how can I temporarily keep my old panel hot until all the circuits are moved over to the new one. ....
Seems pretty easy. Turn the old panel into a sub panel. Install the new panel where the old meter and socket is since you're putting this outside in new service. Run a short conduit stub from new to old panel and feed old panel with a 100A breaker off the new panel. Be sure to disconnect the neutral and ground bonding point in the old panel once you switch to the new panel. After this is done you can retire circuit by circuit from the old panel to the new one. Take a day, a month, or a year if you like.

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Old 02-04-2012, 01:48 AM   #3
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And check with your POCO for latest details reguarding of service drops due they will stated the heights of drop , meter box height , location where the new meter will be at.

There is not much you can do with location of meter socket due the POCO have pretty much written in their regulations.

So talk to them to see if that location is ok.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 02-04-2012, 07:17 AM   #4
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I have already pulled a permit and cleared the meter & mast location with both the local utility & building authority. It is just that ideally my new panel would be located in the middle of the stand off board rather than smooshed to the left next to the old panel. That is why I was thinking of pulling it off the board and letting it hang by the wires for awhile. I do not wish to incorporate it as a sub panel if I don't have to. Just jumper it in for a short time to keep the essentials running while I make the transition.
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Old 02-04-2012, 10:07 AM   #5
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I would not hang it from the wires. It will need some support.

Is it possible to move the panel away from the wall and turn it a little while you still keep everything connected. I would suggest having the meter pulled while doing this though. In case a wire gets pulled out.

Then you could put the new panel where the old one was. You may only be able to move the panel half way over mount new panel and then move it after all the circuits are moved.

Last edited by rrolleston; 02-04-2012 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 02-04-2012, 10:28 AM   #6
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I could use a line to hang the panel from a joist I suppose. I was going to pull the meter box off the board too while it is still connected. Just enough to get the new unit on the board and ready for service. When the utility makes the swap I wanted to use the old feed for a temporary jump between the new and old panel. About a 2 foot piece I was thinking.
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:04 AM   #7
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To feed your old panel with your new panel you will have to use four wire with a separate neutral and ground.
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:50 AM   #8
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PoleCat,
A few things:
1) I wouldn't recommend moving the meter socket live. If something goes wrong you've got a live service entrance cable that cannot be turned off. Additionally, from the photo it looks like the meter socket is mounted with screws on the inside. At least around here that part is locked and cannot be opened until the utility pulls the meter.

2) Remember you're going to need to have you new panel inspected before the utility will turn power back on. I would be quite surprised if your inspector will let you get by with an old panel wired but incorrectly mounted next to the new panel.

3) Do you have enough slack in your current circuit wires to reach where you want to put the new panel? If not, it may make more sense to leave the old panel as a sub panel.

4) I'd suggest that you identify the essential circuits (fridge, lights, etc.) so that you can just move them over the day of your upgrade. Then you can take your time restoring electricity to the rest of the house.
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:22 PM   #9
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If you leave enough extra wire from the new meter socket and enough wire from your grounding you could always slide the new panel to where the old one is now. when you are ready to switch everything. I think that would be the easiest way.
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Old 02-04-2012, 08:44 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a_lost_shadow View Post
PoleCat,
A few things:
1) I wouldn't recommend moving the meter socket live. If something goes wrong you've got a live service entrance cable that cannot be turned off. [That is a very valid point I am glad you brought up] Additionally, from the photo it looks like the meter socket is mounted with screws on the inside. At least around here that part is locked and cannot be opened until the utility pulls the meter. [It is just a disposable wire seal here. The power company has allowed me to break it before.]

2) Remember you're going to need to have you new panel inspected before the utility will turn power back on. I would be quite surprised if your inspector will let you get by with an old panel wired but incorrectly mounted next to the new panel. [Yup. It has to pass inspection before the utility will make the swap.]

3) Do you have enough slack in your current circuit wires to reach where you want to put the new panel? If not, it may make more sense to leave the old panel as a sub panel. [Most of the circuits are 3/12 stubs to nearby junction boxes where they seperate off into 2 circuits with a shared neutral.]

4) I'd suggest that you identify the essential circuits (fridge, lights, etc.) so that you can just move them over the day of your upgrade. Then you can take your time restoring electricity to the rest of the house. [The wife is going to have some say in this]
Great advice thanks.
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Old 02-04-2012, 08:44 PM   #11
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If you leave enough extra wire from the new meter socket and enough wire from your grounding you could always slide the new panel to where the old one is now. when you are ready to switch everything. I think that would be the easiest way.
Sounds like a plan.
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Old 02-04-2012, 09:11 PM   #12
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Any time you have two circuits sharing a neutral I think it has to be a double pole breaker.
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:46 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrolleston
Any time you have two circuits sharing a neutral I think it has to be a double pole breaker.
Correct. Consider setting a disco outside so you can control power as needed to the panel(s) note 4 wire required after disco to panel.
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:02 AM   #14
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Any time you have two circuits sharing a neutral I think it has to be a double pole breaker.
This is not the case in my house. I'm not sure when the Pushmatic was installed but the only DP breakers go to the dryer and AC. 1930 house with some original 14ga wiring still in service.

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