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scotty123 02-12-2009 10:11 AM

Moving Phone Jack
 
Hi,
I am renovating my kitchen and while the baseboards are off i felt it would be a good time for this. I would like to move my phone jack down the wall about 6 feet to hide if behind a cabinet. Is this as simple as matching the wiring and extending it down the wall, then put the jack back on?

I dont think i have to turn off any electricity for this right?

TazinCR 02-12-2009 10:14 AM

You have the right idea. No electrical problems.

220/221 02-12-2009 10:17 AM

Quote:

Is this as simple as matching the wiring and extending it down the wall, then put the jack back on?
Yeah.

The only tricky part is stripping the insulation off the tiny wires without damaging the wire itself.

The connectors you use to splice the wires are important also. Those wires are really really small.

Phone line voltage won't hurt you.....generally.

Don't strip it with your teeth when someone's calling in.:jester:

scotty123 02-12-2009 10:38 AM

Ok thanks, i got a little more info. The are two wires coming into the jack, both have a green, black, yellow and red wire which are connected to the corresponding wire screws. The wires from where the plug is have the same four wires but the black and yellow are not connected to anything. I'm assuming this is done right, are the black and yellow wires for posible future phone line additions or something like that?

Also im assuming there are two sets of wires coming into the box because it is hooked up in parallel?

Jim Port 02-12-2009 12:52 PM

The black and yellow were used to power a lighted dial in the older phones. You could use them for a second number if you wanted to.

There are connectors made for phone wire that do not require the wires to be stripped. They use insulation dispalcement instead. Scotch calls then UR3 I believe.

scotty123 02-12-2009 01:00 PM

Thanks very much, you have been very helpful.

jamiedolan 02-12-2009 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 229271)
The black and yellow were used to power a lighted dial in the older phones. You could use them for a second number if you wanted to.

There are connectors made for phone wire that do not require the wires to be stripped. They use insulation dispalcement instead. Scotch calls then UR3 I believe.

They sell the connectors as mentioned above at the big box stores. They are far and away the easiest thing for someone without telco tools to use to make connecions.
Jamie

ctsmiths 02-12-2009 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 229271)
The black and yellow were used to power a lighted dial in the older phones. You could use them for a second number if you wanted to.

You also need these for digital phones ( all 4 wires that is), not that you have any.

theatretch85 02-12-2009 10:47 PM

When working on telephone wires you should either disconnect the line at the demarc box outside your house (this is a box installed by the telephone company) or make sure a phone is off the hook when working on the wires.

There is 96 volts AC that comes through the phone line when the phone is ringing, and if you happen to be touching the red and green wires when a call comes in it will give you a shock, believe me I have been there done that!

I have never heard of the Black/Yellow wires being used for anything other than a second phone line, but I guess anything is possible. In most homes the second pair of wires is never used since most people only have one phone line. Newer homes are being wired with cat 3/cat5 which has 8 wires in the bundle allowing up to 4 phone lines or 2 phone lines and LAN connection (split pairs).

The digital phones I have seen use only 2 wires.

Chemist1961 02-13-2009 05:47 AM

Scotty if you're not already done be careful stripping the insulataion. It is easy to nick the strand underneath and then the wire breaks when you twist it. I have a micro stripper for this but sometimes you can actually use a thumbnail dug in or the tips of your pliers.:thumbsup:

jerryh3 02-13-2009 06:11 AM

I use these. Some wires don't work well with the stripping notches. If not, I just grip the insulation gently with the scissors and pull. The insulation usually pulls right off.
http://www.sjgreatdeals.com/kln21007.html

gregzoll 02-13-2009 07:28 AM

For those that stated about stripping the Telephone wiring, when splicing, no you do not strip the wires, but use Scothloc connectors. As for moving it, that is simple, and if able to pull to somewhere else without splicing, do it.

vsheetz 02-13-2009 10:21 PM

took them out...
 
During our major remodel I removed any telephone jack that me relocate it - with the advent of low cost long range cordless phones with multiple phones (charging jacks only, requiring just a AC outlet) I have no corded phones in the house. The base unit with answering machine resides in the my home office where there is the one jack that is needed.

BTW - get the newer DECT phones that operate at 1.8 Mhz to eliminate interference with your comouter wireless LAN and they give great range, features, etc.

Pudge565 02-14-2009 12:14 PM

Yea but if you only have cordless phones when the power goes out after the batteries die you have no phone.

thegonagle 02-14-2009 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pudge565 (Post 230259)
Yea but if you only have cordless phones when the power goes out after the batteries die you have no phone.

Most cordless phones have no backup batteries in the base station, so if the power goes out, the base can't communicate with the handset. One should always have a plain old corded phone on hand just in case. (Of course, if you have a landline from your cable company, the phone modem thingy loses power in an outage, and you have no phone anyway--so YMMV.)


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