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-   -   Mixing 14/2 and 12/2 wire on one circuit? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/mixing-14-2-12-2-wire-one-circuit-136822/)

dekohl 03-12-2012 05:03 PM

Mixing 14/2 and 12/2 wire on one circuit?
 
I am doing a bathroom remodel and have a 20 AMP circuit with only a single outlet and 12/2 wire. I have two other outlets that are already wired with 14/2 wire. I would like to put the outlets on the same circuit and wondering if it is okay to mix the 14/2 and 12/2 wires on the same circuit IF I swap out the breaker to a 15 AMP. I've calculated the load and the 15 AMP would be sufficient.

I know I could not mix in the 14/2 on teh 20 AMP circuit but I believe it is okay to mix them on the 15AMP.

Lighting Retro 03-12-2012 05:06 PM

you can run wire above code minimums without issue, but your capacity on the circuit is related to the smallest conductor on the circuit. Sounds like you have determined this is not an issue for you, and you might save a few bucks by using material you have in stock vs buy a new roll of wire when you only needed a few feet.

<*(((>< 03-12-2012 05:17 PM

Where are you located? Codes will vary by location.

Here in the states one is required to have one of the following scenarios for bathrooms:

1)OUTLETS in multiple bathrooms can be on a shared 20 amp circuit.

OR

2) You can have a dedicated 20 amp circuit for ONE bathroom's outlets, lights, fan, etc on one.

But in the case you suggest you would not be meeting current code standards only having 15amp capacity.

Dierte 03-12-2012 08:12 PM

NEC states that whatever gauge you start a circuit with you must end the circuit with that gauge.

jbfan 03-12-2012 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dierte (Post 876302)
NEC states that whatever gauge you start a circuit with you must end the circuit with that gauge.

Do you have a code section to back that up?

Dierte 03-12-2012 08:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan

Do you have a code section to back that up?

Let me look.

Missouri Bound 03-12-2012 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dierte (Post 876302)
NEC states that whatever gauge you start a circuit with you must end the circuit with that gauge.

...and you should leave witrh the girl you brought to the dance.:laughing:

Jim Port 03-12-2012 11:42 PM

You will not find it in the code book Dierte.

i would not remove 1/4 of the circuit capacity just to keep the 14-2 in the circuit. Remove it and keep the 20 amp capacity.

Dierte 03-13-2012 05:42 AM

I stand corrected. Must have been one of those things I was told long ago.

seansy59 03-13-2012 06:01 AM

14/2 on 15 amps

12/2 on 20 amps

You can never have 14/2 on a 20 amp circuit.

jbfan 03-13-2012 07:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seansy59 (Post 876523)
14/2 on 15 amps

12/2 on 20 amps

You can never have 14/2 on a 20 amp circuit.

Never is a long time.:whistling2:

There are times when it is allowed.

busman 03-13-2012 07:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seansy59 (Post 876523)
14/2 on 15 amps

12/2 on 20 amps

You can never have 14/2 on a 20 amp circuit.

Oh really. Got a code section to back that up?

Jim Port 03-13-2012 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seansy59 (Post 876523)
14/2 on 15 amps

12/2 on 20 amps

You can never have 14/2 on a 20 amp circuit.

Might want to check out motor circuit or HVAC sizing.

You would be correct for general purpose circuits.


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