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Old 11-22-2010, 09:39 AM   #31
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Here is the picture of the current load center and the sub panel in the home.




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Old 11-22-2010, 10:05 AM   #32
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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Service conductors are often aluminum. Aluminum wire is bad when it's not installed properly. Same with that aluminum bus of yours. CORRECT torquing of all terminal screws (read the labels and use a torque wrench!) and a good application of noalox (or similar anti-oxidation paste/grease) is necessary, and probably could have solved your original problem without all of this
Two of the original breakers were completely melted internally the last time. But, I should have replaced the bus bar and the things you listed. This is why I prefer to have an electrician do this. They would know things from experience that I don't. I wish I knew of this site back then. As far as the wiring goes, I didn't install any of that. It was pre-existing. I had to hunt for the breakers because these boxes aren't made anymore. Upgrading will definitely solve a lot of problems and bring it up to code.

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the biggest challenge you're going to see is the wires not being long enough.
Is there a way to splice in more wire? Or some kind of connector like a bus bar to add in more wire? In the sub panel I can free up 10 in on the netural by flipping the bus the other way and moving it down an inch or two. Not sure about the ground. Maybe free up 5-6 inches by doing the same thing.
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Old 11-22-2010, 10:28 AM   #33
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Also, the wires from the shed are two short, can I put in some kind of junction box under the sub panel in the shed to extend the wires there as well? If that is not possible then I'll have to move the shed sub panel down a foot or two. It's currently about 5 feet from the floor.

Last edited by The Mindz i; 11-22-2010 at 10:31 AM.
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Old 11-22-2010, 11:39 AM   #34
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Splices after the breaker are certainly possible, but big wire isn't fun to work with.

"split bolts", you'll want. I'm unaware of wire nuts that'll take 2awg conductors, although I'm sure someone makes them.

I believe you're going to find that the four service conductors are twisted along their length, and, being a trailer, probably direct-buried. Freeing up ANY length inside the indoor panel isn't going to help outdoors, because you're not going to be able to pull it.

The "shed" panel must be fed from some of those smaller wires in there, and they all look to be in the size range that is more manageably spliced.



And while we're on the subject, even though it's completely irrelevant to your specific task, let me state that I absolutely hate that Bryant POS subpanel of yours. Typical mobile home fare I suppose. I've got one in the garage at a house I'm working on - the whole thing feels flimsy as heck, the ground/neutral busses are in absolutely stupid spots that make it virtually impossible to install 'neatly', and frankly I'm not even convinced the manufacturer-recommended breakers WORK.
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Old 11-22-2010, 05:02 PM   #35
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


If you could see all the corners cut when the manufacturer built this thing, you'd see that the Bryant panel is the least of the problems. I'd discourage anyone from buying a mobile home. Which isn't very mobile by the way.

I hope it's got conduit. But, like you said, it's probably twisted together. Well, the electrician is coming out Friday, so I'll see what options we have.

What do electricians do with the wire they pull after installing new wire? There's got to be some money in it. If I end up doing it myself, I'm not going to just chunk it.
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Old 11-22-2010, 05:14 PM   #36
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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What do electricians do with the wire they pull after installing new wire? There's got to be some money in it.
If it is copper, absolutely.
We treat it as a tip.
If a customer asked for it I would pull it out and leave it where it landed.

On HUGE rip-outs it is sometimes built into the job price.
A guy I used to work for did this just this summer. He recycled almost $20K worth on one job.
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Old 11-22-2010, 08:11 PM   #37
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


For what it's worth, I live in a mobile home myself.

GE panel, which I don't mind, except that the entire thing, which is very tiny, is populated with slim breakers...

The part that irks me is that I can hit two breakers and turn off all of the non-kitchen non-dedicated receptacles...

Two for kitchen/diningroom, one for livingroom+bedroom2, one for mbr+bedroom1, one for washer, one for the gfci in the bathroom... that's all, folks.

Then there's the cardboard floors... and idk wtf they were smoking when they chose the door hardware - the back door opens itself randomly, locked or not...

Yesterday the washing machine drained into the bathtub?



Believe me, I do know how cheaply these things are built



Oh, as I said, I don't personally mind the GE panel itself. I DO mind the fact that the wall it's installed in isn't secured to the ceiling at all.
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Old 11-22-2010, 11:35 PM   #38
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A guy I used to work for did this just this summer. He recycled almost $20K worth on one job.
WOW!
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Old 11-23-2010, 12:00 AM   #39
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Yesterday the washing machine drained into the bathtub?
LOL! Our tub is the original and was rusting from underneath. It just started leaking Saturday. I was planning on putting a shower in anyway. I'm expecting to fall through the floor and get stuck like in the Tom Hanks movie "Money Pit". One thing at a time I suppose.

Our home has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room, kitchen and small office. One of the bathrooms doesn't have a GFCI plug in it. The outlets near the kitchen sink don't have them ether. And I didn't see any GFCI breakers in the sub panel when I pulled the cover off. So, after the load center problem is solved, I'm going to do some electrical upgrades. Mobile homes burn up quick, so I definitely want to put some GFCI parts in. Plus the wires going from one half of the home to the other is joined with a wire nut. No box to contain it. If it came loose and started arcing, it could start the ceiling on fire. Crazy.
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Old 11-23-2010, 05:30 AM   #40
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


GFCIs are intended to help reduce shock hazard. They do next to nothing for fire hazards. That's what breakers are for. The only way lack of a GFCI is causing a fire is if the shock throws you backwards and you knock over a candle.

That's an awful lot of rooms for a mobile. Has to be a doublewide. We're in a regular plain old trailer. 3 bedrooms, bathroom, livingroom, combined diningroom/kitchen. It was "unlivable" and slated to be scrapped, but it was bigger than the one we were living in before. We NEED the space (the female figure of the household is set on helping people in need, so we seem to have become a shelter. We have 11 people living here right now...) so somehow we convinced the landlord to let us claim the trailer at a ridiculously low rent provided we did all the work to fix it... I never fancied myself a plumber and my carpentry skills ain't that great either but here we are. :P
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Old 11-23-2010, 11:21 AM   #41
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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Our home has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room, kitchen and small office. One of the bathrooms doesn't have a GFCI plug in it. The outlets near the kitchen sink don't have them ether.y.
many times there was once GFCI and any other recep that could be on the same circuit that also required GFCI was fed through that one. Try tripping the one GFCI and then checking other receps to see if any others are also off.
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Old 11-24-2010, 09:42 AM   #42
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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GFCIs are intended to help reduce shock hazard. They do next to nothing for fire hazards
I thought that GFCIs are more sensitive, causing them to trip easier and faster? So AFCIs is what I want to use. Are all breakers AFCI if not GFCI?
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Old 11-24-2010, 09:54 AM   #43
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Does code allow me to use PVC fittings and conduit on the main load center or should I use aluminum?
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Old 11-24-2010, 02:38 PM   #44
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Sure why not I don't see that issue at all but just make sure you use the EGC { Electrode grounding conductor } aka full 4 wire for your set up.

Merci.
Marc
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Old 11-24-2010, 04:45 PM   #45
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


The trip point I keep seeing referenced for residential GFCIs is about 6mA.

That's 0.006 amps.

Obviously they don't trip when you pull 0.006 amps. The difference is that a GFCI detects a condition where "the power is going somewhere, but not coming back through the neutral, so we don't know where it's going. It must be going through Bob's arm."

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