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Old 11-18-2010, 04:47 PM   #1
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


I live in a mobile home and have a Zinco load center that's going on the fritz. It's currently 100 amps. I figure I might as well put in a 200 amp box since our house is 100, our shed is 50 and our a.c. is 50. The new box I'm looking at is 28.7 in tall. This will put it much closer to the ground since our old box is only 13 in tall and the bottom is 18 in from the ground. I'm in Florida and not sure what the minimum allowable distance is between the load center and the ground. Does anyone here have an idea?

http://www.lowes.com/pd_37966-76863-TM820RCUFLP_4294821907+4294965819+4294820182+42948 67278_4294937087_?productId=3128711&Ns=p_product_p rd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_quantity_sold|1&pl=1&c urrentURL=%2Fpl_Outdoor_4294821907%2B4294965819%2B 4294820182%2B4294867278_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_produ ct_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_quantity_sold|1&fa cetInfo=GE|Main%20breaker|Outdoor


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Old 11-18-2010, 06:11 PM   #2
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


If your area subscribes to the rules in the NEC, unless that area is prone to flooding, there is no minimum. There is a maximum though. The highest breaker when in the up most position cannot be higher than (I believe) 6'7".

If it was me, I would not put it under the meter like the old panel. I would most likely mount the panel and meter side by side.

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Old 11-18-2010, 08:08 PM   #3
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


First thing is check with your POCO in your area to see what the requirement.

Second the POCO will have listing of what the approved type meter pedstail they will allowed in your area.

Normally the meter socket will typicaly pretty close to 5 foot above ground level unless stated otherwise.

And check with your mobile home park manger to see what they allow or what else it will required due there are few diffrent requirement or rules it have to follow.


Merci.
Marc
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Old 11-19-2010, 07:22 AM   #4
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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If your area subscribes to the rules in the NEC, unless that area is prone to flooding, there is no minimum....
Minimum distance from the bottom of a disconnect for a mobile home is 24 inches above the finished grade or working platform. NEC 550.32(F)

This is the only instance where a minimum distance is specified, and many jurisdictions ignore this requirement. Check with your local inspector-critter on this.
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Old 11-19-2010, 08:16 AM   #5
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Why not get an all-in-one meter/main/panel?

They use these in the southwest all the time.
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Old 11-19-2010, 09:13 AM   #6
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


Thanks guys. I noticed that the newer boxes in the park are 2 feet or higher. That's what prompted the question in the first place. I think I'll mount it on the back side of the meter. Most of the updated boxes are done this way in the park. I wish the park would take care of this, but they made it clear when we moved in that from the meter to our house is our responsibility. Still hoping to find an electrician who will install this for 300 in labor, but no success yet.

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Old 11-20-2010, 09:32 AM   #7
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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Still hoping to find an electrician who will install this for 300 in labor, but no success yet.
HAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHA
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Old 11-20-2010, 03:57 PM   #8
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HAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHA
Nice...

I was searching through the net for answers to questions and had come across posts by electricians who said they install main load centers for between 250 and 300 in labor. They were independent of course.

We had a company come out and quote us 850. No way I was going to pay that. I can get the parts and permit for 225. 300 for 2 to 3 hours of work is great money. That's 100 to 150 an hour for an independent electrician who has no boss he has to share his money with.

Also, keep in mind, Speedy, businesses in Florida don't have the ridiculous amounts of taxes to pay to keep running, like in New York. I've heard nightmare stories about how much taxes businesses pay up there. I would never start a business in New York.

At any rate, we've got a number for an independent electrician who is used by friends we know and are going to see what he's going to charge and go from there.
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Old 11-20-2010, 04:24 PM   #9
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That's 100 to 150 an hour for an independent electrician who has no boss he has to share his money with.
So you want some schmoe doing side work. You should have said that in the first place.
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Old 11-20-2010, 04:52 PM   #10
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300 for 2 to 3 hours of work is great money.
It would probably take an hour for an independent electrician to drive to your location and set up the tools and materials. If you can do the entire job in 2-3 hours, you should become an electrician.
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Old 11-20-2010, 05:36 PM   #11
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


That second example is one of the ugliest installations of its type I've ever seen!



Okay. No, it's not a "2-3 hour" job. My last one took 6. Granted, that one was a bit ... exceptional . . . a PITA actually... but still.

You won't find it to be a drop-in replacement, I can almost guarantee that. The conduit will not line up. The wires will not be long enough. The new box will be just a hair to big/small/whatever to go in the spot you want it to. The company will have installed the knockouts in exactly the spots you wish they hadn't. You will get a model that requires some stupid adapter or hardware doohickey that will not be sold at the same place as you bought the disconnect, the nearest supplier will be 70 miles away and closed on all days except the ones where you absolutely cannot be there. They will not ship. There will be seventeen new relevant codes that were adopted since the original installation, and what is already there will violate every single one of them except the easy-to-fix one. There will be a tornado while you are working (had to throw that in, being a trailer park and all).

Did I mention you have to coordinate all of this with the power company to get the thing actually turned off so you don't blow yourself up in the process of replacing the device typically responsible for turning things off? Oh, and I guarantee they will either show up to turn the power back on fifteen minutes before you are done (and no, they won't wait), or they'll keep you (or your electrician) waiting around for an hour afterwards.

Of course this won't ALL happen to you, but the point I'm making is, it's seldom (if ever) as easy as it seems. Your electricians' quotes are taking this into consideration.



Regarding the 'combination device' suggested by another. They're clean and neat (and look a lot better than that abomination), so if they're available in your area and allowed by your utility, replacing the whole shebang is a good idea. I think they're usually cheaper than seperates. In my area they're actually slightly more expensive, but not significantly, and a whole lot easier.



As a sidenote, I live in the middle of nowhere. We get entertainment by blowing stuff up in the back yard. Frankly, I look at that thing and think... "cool, it's on the fritz. Well, it's on a pole outside, not in my livingroom. Grab the marshmallows and let it burn."
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Old 11-20-2010, 11:14 PM   #12
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There will be a tornado while you are working.
That made me laugh out loud. Sometimes my work days make me wish a tornado would come by.
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Old 11-20-2010, 11:51 PM   #13
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


You will be suprised how long to change that sucker I have changed few like that and it is not a simple changeover due you have few other crap in the way.

The last one I done it was quadplex set up and have to split in double meter pedestal { per Wisconsin POCO requirement } that took me little over 4 hours per set { I have to change 6 of them }

300 Euros for a guy for the labour only or the whole thing ? If whole thing I will not go near that kind price.

But if someone provide the materals I am not too crazy due some case they will get wrong item and it is not useable per code requirement.

Merci.
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Old 11-21-2010, 09:03 AM   #14
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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As a sidenote, I live in the middle of nowhere. We get entertainment by blowing stuff up in the back yard. Frankly, I look at that thing and think... "cool, it's on the fritz. Well, it's on a pole outside, not in my livingroom. Grab the marshmallows and let it burn."
LOL.

I've had to get a permit before to replace the breakers in it. And I had to work with the POCO to have them pull the meter. Even had my dad machine a part to lock down the main breaker because of new code requirements. After all was said and done the inspector passed the box and had the POCO turn the power back on. Of course, I know this is not going to be this simple. But working with the POCO isn't that bad around here. I know it's not a simple drop in job. If it was, I wouldn't be in here asking questions, I'd just do it myself right now. But, I've had mechanics who insisted that working on cars should be left to a professional, that it's too difficult to do by an owner. Over the years, I've learned how to rebuild an engine, and fix just about anything on a car. People in a trade tend to make there job sound more complicated than it really is. No doubt, this is going to be difficult for an average joe like me. That's why I'm hoping to find someone who can do it within our budget. Otherwise, your going to see a lot of me in here. Because we have to get this fixed.

There was one owner on the net that was asking questions, and he was getting blasted from electricians trying to discourage him from doing it himself. When he was done, it past inspection and he impressed several of the electricians at how well he had done it. With all the knowledge and experience you guys have in these forums, I'm hoping that if I do have to do this myself, I can do it right and pass an inspection.

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My last one took 6.
Even at 300 for 6 hours your making good money. If electricians make more than 50 an hour then I do need to become an electrician. That's some really good money. I'll be watching whoever is doing it, so I can learn something.

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So you want some schmoe doing side work. You should have said that in the first place.
Speedy, the schmoe that we're trying to get out here for a quote worked for NASA for 20 years. He can probably teach you some things. Some independent contractors realize they can make more money on there own, instead of working for a company that takes all their money. Let me guess, your part of a union?

I do have some other questions related to this project. Do I need to post it as a separate thread, or can I post it in this one?
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Old 11-21-2010, 09:19 AM   #15
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Minimum distance from ground for load center.


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Speedy, the schmoe that we're trying to get out here for a quote worked for NASA for 20 years. He can probably teach you some things. Some independent contractors realize they can make more money on there own, instead of working for a company that takes all their money. Let me guess, your part of a union?
Are you serious? What in the world does NASA have to do with construction electrical work??? You can's just throw the name NASA around and expect everyone to be impressed.
I bet he COULD teach me a few things about NASA related stuff, I also bet I could teach HIM a few things about being a self-employed construction and service electrical contractor.

BTW, no, I am not union. NEVER will be. Most union guys take work away from me by doing side work during the long periods they are laid off.

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