Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-11-2011, 12:06 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10
Default

melted light cover in shower


we just bought a house and my husband left the shower light on overnight, the plastic cover melted, we don't know the manufacturer and don't know how to go about replacing it, what should we do? Is it safe to take a shower without a cover? How can we cover it temporarily until we find a solution? Thank you! Julie

juliev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 12:46 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: MA
Posts: 734
Rewards Points: 532
Default

melted light cover in shower


Look on the side of the can, where the bulb goes. Are there any model numbers?

How big was the bulb in there?

AandPDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 12:59 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 295
Rewards Points: 250
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by juliev View Post
we just bought a house and my husband left the shower light on overnight, the plastic cover melted, we don't know the manufacturer and don't know how to go about replacing it, what should we do? Is it safe to take a shower without a cover? How can we cover it temporarily until we find a solution? Thank you! Julie
Is this a recessed light? If so, the lighting fixture should have a thermal cut-off that turns off the fixture if it overheats from the bulb. Either your fixture doesn't have one, or it failed. I'd be cautious about using that fixture again.

If it's a flush mount ceiling fixture, I'd double-check to make sure that it is UL-rated for wet locations, otherwise, it should not be used in the shower.

If you can disconnect the power supply to the fixture, you should be able to use the shower without a cover intact, but I would not use the shower with an open light can or flush-mount fixture that is energized.

If you have attic access over the shower, I'd replace the light fixture with an IC-rated recessed can that includes a thermal cutoff and an approved shower trim ring rated for wet locations. A thermal cutoff should prevent the fixture from overheating. If you are really spooked about it, you could replace the lightswitch with a countdown timer that would automatically shutoff the light.

Whatever you end up doing, make sure that light bulb you use is does not exceed the rating of the fixture (usually 60-watt incandescant for totally-enclosed fixtures).
clashley is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to clashley For This Useful Post:
Bud Cline (10-11-2011)
Old 10-11-2011, 01:33 PM   #4
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 10,243
Rewards Points: 2,136
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
If you can disconnect the power supply to the fixture, you should be able to use the shower without a cover intact, but I would not use the shower with an open light can or flush-mount fixture that is energized.
Agreed!
__________________
XXX
Bud Cline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 02:53 PM   #5
Member
 
bubbler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Shore MA
Posts: 481
Rewards Points: 250
Default

melted light cover in shower


I am not an electrician, so what I say below is my opinion:

If you were installing a new light I think it would also be required to be protected by a GFCI (either at the breaker, or just downstream of a GFCI outlet).

If I were replacing the light I'd find a way to get GFCI protection as well, either by replacing an outlet upstream, re-wiring, changing the breaker, or combo GFCI/switch which I believe this is.

Last edited by bubbler; 10-11-2011 at 03:48 PM. Reason: make it clear this is my opinion, not an electrician
bubbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 03:26 PM   #6
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,864
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

melted light cover in shower


Wow, quite a bit of misinformation in this thread. I wish you guys would state what is opinion and what is fact, and that your opinions are not based on professional experience. Sorry, EE's are NOT electricians and the relation to construction electric is marginal at best.

An open recessed light is code compliant in a shower and only needs to be damp location rated, as most are.
A recessed light that is subject to shower spray must have a wet location rate TRIM.
A recessed light in a shower does NOT require GFI protection, unless the manufacturer specifies it, and almost all do not.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Speedy Petey For This Useful Post:
gregzoll (10-11-2011), jbfan (10-11-2011)
Old 10-11-2011, 03:31 PM   #7
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,864
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

melted light cover in shower


See NEC 410.10(D) for more information.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Speedy Petey For This Useful Post:
gregzoll (10-11-2011)
Old 10-11-2011, 03:43 PM   #8
Member
 
bubbler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Shore MA
Posts: 481
Rewards Points: 250
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Wow, quite a bit of misinformation in this thread. I wish you guys would state what is opinion and what is fact, and that your opinions are not based on professional experience. Sorry, EE's are NOT electricians and the relation to construction electric is marginal at best.

An open recessed light is code compliant in a shower and only needs to be damp location rated, as most are.
A recessed light that is subject to shower spray must have a wet location rate TRIM.
A recessed light in a shower does NOT require GFI protection, unless the manufacturer specifies it, and almost all do not.
Sorry, you're right, I'm not an electrician... going by what I was told by my electrician.

He said that all lights/fans/switches needed to be protected by GFCI in the bathroom, and told me the common sense thinking was that anything you can potential touch from within the shower by reaching out of it--like a light in the shower, or wall switch with a few feet--must be protected.

If that's mis-information then I apologize.

FWIW, the fixture in my shower is a fan/light combo, so maybe that changes the requirement vs. just a single light.

Even if not required, would you agree that GFCI on a shower light is not necessarily a bad idea?
bubbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 03:48 PM   #9
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,864
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbler View Post
Sorry, you're right, I'm not an electrician... going by what I was told by my electrician.

He said that all lights/fans/switches needed to be protected by GFCI in the bathroom, and told me the common sense thinking was that anything you can potential touch from within the shower by reaching out of it--like a light in the shower, or wall switch with a few feet--must be protected.
Well, a lot of guys, even seasoned electricians, still go by "what they were told" and not what is fact or accurate. I know some guys that have been in the trade for 30 years and don't even own a current code book. Sad really.
If a shower light is installed properly there is no danger of touch potential.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbler View Post
FWIW, the fixture in my shower is a fan/light combo, so maybe that changes the requirement vs. just a single light.
That actually does change everything. Most bath fan manufacturers DO require GFI protection when FANS are installed over tubs or showers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbler View Post
Even if not required, would you agree that GFCI on a shower light is not necessarily a bad idea?
It's not a bad idea, just unnecessary. If it makes one feel better than have at it.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 03:57 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 225
Rewards Points: 158
Default

melted light cover in shower


if you don't want to plastic melt again put a cfl bulb instead if possible
carmusic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 03:59 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 295
Rewards Points: 250
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Wow, quite a bit of misinformation in this thread. I wish you guys would state what is opinion and what is fact, and that your opinions are not based on professional experience. Sorry, EE's are NOT electricians and the relation to construction electric is marginal at best.

An open recessed light is code compliant in a shower and only needs to be damp location rated, as most are.
A recessed light that is subject to shower spray must have a wet location rate TRIM.
A recessed light in a shower does NOT require GFI protection, unless the manufacturer specifies it, and almost all do not.
Question: when would a recessed light can installed in a shower not be subject to shower spray? I can understand a bathtub without a shower head, but I would expect that any can installed in a working shower would be potentially subject to spray.

Every can I have seen is rated for damp locations, but specifies that a wet-rated trim be installed if the light will be directly over a shower. I've never seen a can specify GFCI protection for installation over a shower(although most fan/light combos I've seen do require GFCI if they will be over the shower).

That being said, I've never been big on putting bathroom lights on GFCIs. Nothing more fun that fumbling around in the dark...
clashley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 03:59 PM   #12
Member
 
bubbler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Shore MA
Posts: 481
Rewards Points: 250
Default

melted light cover in shower


Thanks for straightening me out.
bubbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 04:31 PM   #13
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,864
Rewards Points: 2,032
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by clashley View Post
Question: when would a recessed light can installed in a shower not be subject to shower spray? I can understand a bathtub without a shower head, but I would expect that any can installed in a working shower would be potentially subject to spray.
I've never seen a regular shower head that aimed straight up.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2011, 04:54 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 295
Rewards Points: 250
Default

melted light cover in shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
I've never seen a regular shower head that aimed straight up.
Heh... you have not met my children, then.

clashley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ceiling Fan with Light kit - Light not working aadams Electrical 12 11-03-2010 06:32 PM
Recessed Light and Rain Shower head llevers Electrical 4 05-03-2010 10:26 AM
Bathroom shower surround StevePax General DIY Discussions 0 11-12-2009 12:31 PM
Recessed light directly over shower adpanko Electrical 33 09-16-2009 06:56 AM
Washer agitator/spinner turns one way, but not the other IckesTheSane Appliances 5 01-10-2009 02:53 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.