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Old 07-20-2008, 06:45 PM   #16
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may be a silly question, but.....


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Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
I've seen them, and they're nifty. Very good for homeowners and DIYers. Just to be clear though, we're saying that you can't drill a hole in a box (thereby modifying it) to facilitate installation of a screw. If the box comes with holes already in it, those holes can be used at will.

When I first saw them I thought- Why of course--- that make sense! Why didn't I think of that? Also, using drywall screws for attachment makes them more secure to the stud than the smooth common nails that usually come with the nailed pvc boxes. Really good idea for old work.

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Old 07-20-2008, 07:14 PM   #17
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may be a silly question, but.....


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Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
Around here I have to use a draftstop product, not some silicon off the shelf.

So its more of a building code than anything.
so he COULD maybe hit me on silicone? what is a brand name of such a product and can i get it at the local home depot type store? tnkx! DM
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Old 07-20-2008, 09:01 PM   #18
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so he COULD maybe hit me on silicone? what is a brand name of such a product and can i get it at the local home depot type store? tnkx! DM
If you are required to use a firestop product (always required in commercial fire rated walls) there is a product by 3M called Fire Barrier Sealant that comes in 10oz caulk tubes- it is red/brown in color and costs about $16 a tube. There is also a product called FlameStopper, also in 10oz tubes that some Ace Hardwares carry.
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Old 07-21-2008, 07:44 PM   #19
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may be a silly question, but.....


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The thing I never got
Have you heard this before? I thought my source was maybe the only one who did it that way. OP was asking for help/advice/suggestions which is what I thought this forum was for. I was just passing along some advice that an old timer pro gave me one day. Sort of like when my dad taught me years ago the practice of "clean and tight."
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Old 07-21-2008, 08:18 PM   #20
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may be a silly question, but.....


Firestopping in a single family residence can be accomplised a couple of ways. The intent of filling the holes in the top and bottom plates (and tops and bottoms of dead spaces) is to prevent vertical to horizontal movement of smoke, combustion gas, air, and fire. It is required in combustable construction, and serves to block the air that feeds a fire more than it serves to actually stop a fire.

Most (emphasis on most) jurisdictions will allow firestopping foam for this purpose. Most firestop-rated foams (not Great Stuff or similar products) are for use in non-rated assemblies in single family structures, and can fill gaps of about 1-3/8". The stuff we see around here is orange.

Firecaulk can be used. The 3M basic firecaulk runs about $10-11/tube. Your inspector may want you to use intumescent firecaulk, which expands when exposed to high heat to fill voids left by plastic pipes and wire jackets melting. I see no reason to require firecaulk in a home, except at penetrations of the wall/ceiling between the garage and the house, which is a pseudo-firewall. There's certainly no code that requires firecaulk anywhere else in a house. It is the best way to do it, and will get the least scrutiny from the inspector. For the record, firecaulks vary in color (I see yellow, gray, blue, pink, red, and brown...depending on product and specific use).

Unfaced fiberglass insulation can be stuffed (and I mean stuffed tight) into a void to act as a firestop. I always try to push it out, and if it moves it is too loose.
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Old 07-21-2008, 08:20 PM   #21
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may be a silly question, but.....


Oh yeah, I forgot your question about silicone. If he allows silicone or any other caulk, he's not a good inspector. It cannot be used for firestopping in any circumstance.

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