May Be A Silly Question, But..... - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-20-2008, 12:58 PM   #1
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 2,000
Question

may be a silly question, but.....


hi everyone!
i've seen pictures of outlets with the ground hole UP, and with the ground hole DOWN... is there a code specified way? also, just nailing 2 nails to the stud for an outlet box seems a bit weak, is it ok to drill a hole in the side and add a screw for extra support? lastly, (for today anyway) the holes drilled through the floors to run the romex need to be to be filled with (insert correct substance here) to halt air flow between crawl space and walls.
thank you for your time!

DM


Advertisement

DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 01:27 PM   #2
Whatamess
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Costa Rica
Posts: 423
Rewards Points: 250
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


Up or down doesn't matter you can put a screw in the side. Not suppose to but no harm. If you want air tight GreatStuff works good. Not required.

Advertisement

__________________
I may go home hungry, but not tired and hungry.
TazinCR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 01:50 PM   #3
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


thanks!....this inspector is full of himself and will hit me on any little thing wrong, so i need to be certain. when installing a light switch, always use the black wire? yes? for hole filling i was thinking more along the lines of a caulk gun and some silicone? great stuff is freat, but it has it's drawbacks too... =o/

DM
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 02:31 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 308
Rewards Points: 250
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


Quote:
Originally Posted by MdangermouseM View Post
thanks!....this inspector is full of himself and will hit me on any little thing wrong, so i need to be certain. when installing a light switch, always use the black wire? yes? for hole filling i was thinking more along the lines of a caulk gun and some silicone? great stuff is freat, but it has it's drawbacks too... =o/

DM
Yes, the switch always goes on the hot (black) wire. It also needs to have a ground wire connected to the box, or if a plastic box, then to the ground of the Romex cable.

FW
fw2007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 02:39 PM   #5
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


thought so, thanks! what about the caulk?

DM
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 03:12 PM   #6
Master Electrician
 
JohnJ0906's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 332
Rewards Points: 250
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


If your inspector is a stickler, don't screw through the sides of the boxes. IMO, that is technically a violation, and he might see it that way also.
2 nails have always held boxes very secure for me...
__________________
John from Baltimore
One Day at a Time
"Experience is what you get when you were expecting something else"
"The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the sweetness of low cost is forgotten"
JohnJ0906 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 03:20 PM   #7
Power Gen/RS Engineer
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
Posts: 751
Rewards Points: 500
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


So, what would he say if you installed all of the receptacles horizontally?! I've seen a local trend toward this. Then we'd all be arguing as to which blade should be on top

Sounds like your inspector may have a Napolean complex or short wee-wee...
__________________
Well, now, there's what's right and what's right and never the twain shall meet.
BigJimmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 03:26 PM   #8
Master Electrician
 
JohnJ0906's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 332
Rewards Points: 250
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


The funny thing is, all of the "pro" electrician forums lock any threads started that ask this question. (Not to say that is is a bad question)
It's just that there is no "right" answer, but we will debate it to death anyway....
__________________
John from Baltimore
One Day at a Time
"Experience is what you get when you were expecting something else"
"The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the sweetness of low cost is forgotten"
JohnJ0906 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 03:36 PM   #9
Whatamess
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Costa Rica
Posts: 423
Rewards Points: 250
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


caulk will be fine.
__________________
I may go home hungry, but not tired and hungry.
TazinCR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 05:44 PM   #10
Electrician
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Connecticut, Litchfield
Posts: 2,015
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


Around here I have to use a draftstop product, not some silicon off the shelf.

So its more of a building code than anything.
chris75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 05:52 PM   #11
Don't know it all, yet!
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
Posts: 910
Rewards Points: 500
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


An old electrician once told me that he always installed the ground up. That was in case (not likely, but maybe) you had a plug partially unplugged and dropped something against it, it would hit the inert ground instead of a hot contact. If horizontal, he would install with the common up.

Just one of those things somebody showed me one time who's done it a lot more than I have.
__________________
If it's worth doing, it's worth doing right. If you wouldn't put your name on it, it ain't done right!
downunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 05:59 PM   #12
Electrician
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Connecticut, Litchfield
Posts: 2,015
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


Quote:
Originally Posted by downunder View Post
An old electrician once told me that he always installed the ground up. That was in case (not likely, but maybe) you had a plug partially unplugged and dropped something against it, it would hit the inert ground instead of a hot contact. If horizontal, he would install with the common up.

Just one of those things somebody showed me one time who's done it a lot more than I have.

The thing I never got with installing the ground up and the if something ever got dropped scenario, is so what, now that object hits the ground first and now has a 50/50 chance of still falling against the ungrounded conductor and still short...
chris75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 06:07 PM   #13
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


Receptacle orientation is purely preference. There's no code to substantiate it. There are instances where you can't place them face up (kitchen countertops, etc).

Drilling the hole in the side of the box would in fact be a code violation. You cannot modify a listed product in any way. Whether or not it is going to make a difference is debatable.

Why are you being critical of the inspector, who is doing his job and being thorough? The way I see it, he's advocating for you...The owner and occupant of the house. If he goes easy on you he's doing you and any future owner a disservice. No offense, but you're asking which wire to switch...Electrical basics...Which makes me think that a thorough inspection is the best thing for you. Take the fact that he's a little full of himself with a grain of salt (personality issue) and encourage him to look at your work with reasonable scrutiny.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 06:33 PM   #14
Res Ipsa Loquitur
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southeastern PA
Posts: 363
Rewards Points: 250
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


These boxes CAN be screwed thru the side legally and within code... Arlington Industries non-metallic box-
Attached Images
 
__________________
Did you ever stop to think, then forget to start again?
handyman78 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 06:40 PM   #15
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

may be a silly question, but.....


Quote:
Originally Posted by handyman78 View Post
These boxes CAN be screwed thru the side legally and within code... Arlington Industries non-metallic box-
I've seen them, and they're nifty. Very good for homeowners and DIYers. Just to be clear though, we're saying that you can't drill a hole in a box (thereby modifying it) to facilitate installation of a screw. If the box comes with holes already in it, those holes can be used at will.

Advertisement

Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
outlets


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Basement Renovation Question KUIPORNG Remodeling 234 08-26-2008 09:19 AM
hrv question indep HVAC 3 07-17-2008 11:39 PM
Basement vapor barrier question rob7young Remodeling 2 04-13-2008 10:10 AM
New service Question Onytay Electrical 1 10-24-2007 06:47 AM
One furnace question and one thermostat question lh0628 HVAC 4 10-11-2007 11:17 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts