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Old 10-25-2012, 09:32 AM   #16
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


The "laundry" needs a dedicated 20 amp circuit. So if you have a "laundry" room with a washing machine in it, all the receptacles in that space can be on the laundry circuit. If the water softener is in that space, it can be on the laundry circuit.

As mentioned the fridge can be on the 2 small appliance 20A circuits in the kitchen. The dining room can also be on one of those circuits but I don't do either of those. I run a dedicated 15 to the fridge and separate circuit for the dining room. That's just me.

I connect the lighting to the receptacle circuits in residential. No reason at all not to.

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Old 10-26-2012, 03:07 PM   #17
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


Thanks for the advice. Will up the circuit to the laundry room to 20A. I'm not sure if it actually has to be completely separated from the 220 for the dryer, but to be safe I'm going to do it that way. (I also thought of running a subpanel to the utility room area and running the furnace, softener, washer and dryer off of it on different circuits, which would consolidate wiring a bit, but it might just be a better idea to stick with the original plan.)

I redid my wiring ampacity plan as follows now:
  • 15A (3) circuits for all 3 bedrooms
  • 15A (2) circuits for the living room
  • 15A circuit for the family room
  • 15A circuit for general basement outlets and lighting
  • 15A for furnace blower
  • 20A (2) circuits for the kitchen
  • 20A circuit for the dining room
  • 20A circuit for the utility/laundry room (washer, softener)
  • 20A (2) circuit in each bathroom
  • 20A 220V for central air (that's what it has right now)
  • 30A 220V for electric dryer (same, has that right now)
  • 30A 220 feed to subpanel for detached garage

So, another thing. In terms of general prep for the inspection, do I need to leave ALL of my walls open? Or can I put say the top half of the drywall in and leave the bottom (where all the receptacles are) and areas around switches open? Is it enough that the inspector can simply see where my wiring is going and that it's the right gauge, or do they need actual access to the entire wire run end to end?

The reason I ask is that I'm going to be installing a lot of suspended ceilings, and I need the wall installed to start installing the grid for these (for the perimeter). This would mean that I can't actually install my ceiling fixtures until the grid is installed (I'll be using some boxes designed to attach to the ceiling grid and some build-in flourescent fixtures). I could run wire to the correct locations for the fixtures, but I can't actually do anything until the ceiling is up which needs at least the top section of wall up...

Thanks again

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Old 10-26-2012, 03:13 PM   #18
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


Here you can not install any walls until after the insulation inspection, which comes after the electrical inspection.
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Old 10-26-2012, 04:58 PM   #19
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan View Post
Here you can not install any walls until after the insulation inspection, which comes after the electrical inspection.
Lots of places have no inspections. I think the OP mentioned something about that. My area was inspection free until about 3 years ago.
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Old 10-26-2012, 07:10 PM   #20
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


To make things easy, put lighting together on a couple of circuits, make the receptacles all 20amp.
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Old 10-26-2012, 10:13 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
To make things easy, put lighting together on a couple of circuits, make the receptacles all 20amp.
Why? What is the reason to put receptacle outlets in bedrooms on 20 amp circuits? Living rooms? Hallways and foyers?
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Old 10-26-2012, 10:20 PM   #22
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If I had to redo my bedrooms, which I am thinking of doing it, is pulling 12/12 to replace the 14/2 I put in back in 2003, and making them 20 amp circuits. I can if I wanted to, run 2 lighting circuits on 15 amp, due to using CFL's and fluorescent fixtures downstairs in the basement.

We went from 4 to 8 basic circuits to over 30, and now with conservation methods and better electrical equipment, you could take the circuits back to half of what they are now, if you do not break stuff down to separate rooms on a separate circuit.

I am still in the work in process of mapping out my next chore, when it comes to finishing our Kitchen, that I will end up with 3 more circuits by the time I am done, which will bring it up from six right now. That means 7 20 amp circuits, and 2 15 amp, with one of the 15 amp handling the lighting for Kitchen & dining.

I only have 4 15amp lighting circuits, with one being on the 15amp circuit for the receptacles in my living room. You are talking a 1642sqft home (basement & main floor together). If you add in the lighting circuit for the garage, then that makes it 5 15amp lighting circuits.
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Old 10-26-2012, 10:37 PM   #23
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


Okay I understand. This is just your personal preference for your own home. I imagine some people would think it would be great to have a dedicated 20 amp circuit for each receptacle outlet. In fact a multi wire 20 amp circuit for each duplex. What could be cooler than that?

Not meaning to bust your butt Greg, but some of us do wiring for a living. I would love to come wire your house. You would be very happy and I would go home with a pocket full of money.
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Old 10-26-2012, 10:46 PM   #24
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


jrclen, I used to do this stuff in the Navy. The only bad thing is, I wish that we got paid extra when people dicked with our phones, or when the yard birds cut communication and electrical distribution systems, that they were not supposed to, when my ship was in the yard back in 1987.

My whole electrical use does not even use 65% of what our load center is rated at. I am lucky to peak 48 amps on a good day.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:11 PM   #25
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


I'm all about saving a customer hassles and planning for the future uses, but what you do Greg is utterly overkill. If I wired a home like you describe I would never get a job. Today's codes make things expensive enough with the cost of copper, AFCI's GFI's, and permits that getting jobs very difficult. I can't imagine the cost of that bid if we were to use your logic.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:38 PM   #26
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


K_Buz, the problem is, everyone is still thinking the current way/old way of thinking from the 70's to 90's, not the new way, that things are changing. If you look at those that are conserving and finding ways to not spend more money, you find that electrical designing is changing, if you are forward not backward thinking.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:45 PM   #27
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


Yeah, things are becoming more energy efficient, not less therefore you don't need dedicated circuits/recpets nearly as much.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:51 PM   #28
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


I know that. The point is that I am making, is before you would have needed 6 lighting circuits for a room or house, where as now you could take it down to 2 maybe 3, or even 1 20amp if going with LED. Receptacle loads are still going to be the killer, until they make appliances and tools that are more efficient than they are now, and have been as less efficient as they have been for the past 60 plus years.
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Old 10-27-2012, 09:40 AM   #29
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Major interior remodel - a few questions


Appliances are one thing Greg. Dedicated 20 amp circuits for the built in micro, and laundry, and I usually put the fridge on a dedicated 15. The two 20 amp counter top circuits in the kitchen. And the 20 amp in the bathroom. And so on. Appliances are pretty much covered.

But convenience receptacles in bedrooms and living rooms and hallways will do just fine on 15. A TV which used to draw 4 now takes less than 1. In the digital age we have seen the loads greatly reduced on both lighting and on the things we plug in.

I was in the Navy too, and when you mention the military I think $600 toilet seats and $500 hammers. Government has money to burn, people not so much.

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