Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-07-2009, 03:26 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 114
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


I am installing a generic air flow duct to allow some outside air into my workshop during the warmer months. The duct is in a really high spot and I didnt want to use a manual damper so I purchased an electric inline damper to allow me to close it from a switch in the winter months.

Now I am trying to wire it to a switch instead of a thermostat (the directions say a Low Voltage thermostat is required). The instructions can be seen here:

http://suncourt.com/ZoneMaster_Instructions.html

Basically I want to know if I can use a standard single pole switch in place of the low voltage thermostat mentioned in the installation instructions.

And if NOT, what other options do I have to switch this instead of using a thermostat?

Any thoughts are appreciated!!!

mntnvew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 03:59 PM   #2
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 5,407
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


yes you can but why not use a t-stat?

nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 04:26 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 114
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
yes you can but why not use a t-stat?
Exterior thermostat?

Any notion on how to wire the switch, is it the same just disregard the thermostat graphic in instructions and use the two wires for the single pole switch per usual?

Thanks!
mntnvew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 04:55 PM   #4
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 5,407
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


the switch; yes, just put it inline of the low voltage line just like the t-stat is.

exterior t-stat? I thought you said this was in a workshop.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 06:25 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 780
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


You can connect the transformer to 120 VAC and install the switch in the low voltage line in place of the thermostat connection or wire the transformer direct the the dampener and use the switch to turn the 120 VAC on and off the the transformer.
hayewe farm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 06:36 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Canada (s/w ON.)
Posts: 2,294
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by hayewe farm View Post
You can connect the transformer to 120 VAC and install the switch in the low voltage line in place of the thermostat connection or wire the transformer direct the the dampener and use the switch to turn the 120 VAC on and off the the transformer.
I like your idea of switching the transformer. Then when its turned off, absolutely no power will be used.
Wildie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 07:06 PM   #7
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 5,407
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


the power used by a small transformer is minimal and switching the 120 voltage means he will have to install cabling and or conduit and boxes etc as required per code.

the low voltage wiring can be a phone line run across the floor if he wants.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 07:26 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Canada (s/w ON.)
Posts: 2,294
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
the power used by a small transformer is minimal and switching the 120 voltage means he will have to install cabling and or conduit and boxes etc as required per code.

the low voltage wiring can be a phone line run across the floor if he wants.
What you say is true, unless he uses a lamp cord switch and plugs it into a receptacle.
I wonder what the current rating for this damper would be.
As the damper will only be operated for awhile in the summer, why not have all shut off for the rest of the year!
Wildie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 10:45 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 114
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
exterior t-stat? I thought you said this was in a workshop.
Yeah but I dont want it to open when I have my heat on in the shop in the winter, so an interior t-stat is really useless. If it was outside then it would work, but I am not keen on putting t-stat outside

I will just switch it. i purchased a N/C (Normally Closed) damper so I will actually only have to give it juice to open it during the summer and here in Montana that is only 4-5 months if we are lucky

Thanks, I can always count on this forum for solid advice (8 out of 10 times anyways

L8R
mntnvew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 11:06 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 114
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by hayewe farm View Post
... or wire the transformer direct the the dampener and use the switch to turn the 120 VAC on and off the the transformer.
I like this idea the best. Can anyone confirm my diagram assumptions below, better safe then sorry
Attached Images
 
mntnvew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2009, 01:14 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 780
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Your drawing is correct for using a switch in the low voltage circuit. Or you can add apower cord to the transformer and wire direct to the dampener. No switch required. Plug it in dampner open, unplug it dampner closed.
hayewe farm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2009, 01:18 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 114
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by hayewe farm View Post
Your drawing is correct for using a switch in the low voltage circuit. Or you can add apower cord to the transformer and wire direct to the dampener. No switch required. Plug it in dampner open, unplug it dampner closed.
Excellent, thank you!
mntnvew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2009, 01:19 PM   #13
My License Ain't 4 Sale..
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Atlanta, Ga/Hamilton, Al
Posts: 1,813
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


To be compliant, the transformer needs to be mounted to a junction box, and the splices made appropriately.
InPhase277 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2009, 01:22 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 114
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Quote:
Originally Posted by InPhase277 View Post
To be compliant, the transformer needs to be mounted to a junction box, and the splices made appropriately.
Right, I guess that means I "cant just wire a cord". I have junction boxes with knockouts and will attach the transformer accordingly, thanks for the reminder though
mntnvew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2009, 02:15 PM   #15
zpm
yeah, right
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Low Voltage Wiring for Ele. Inline Duct Damper


Most damper actuators don't use much power, typically a couple of watts at 24vac. An old sprinker timer transformer plugged into a switched receptacle would be another option.

zpm is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NM Wiring Located Near Heat Duct Pineapple Electrical 14 11-05-2008 11:05 AM
Connecting inline duct fan to furnace dlem HVAC 1 02-11-2008 05:50 PM
Old Low Voltage Wiring srwjr Electrical 14 01-24-2007 07:29 PM
Wiring inline duct fan to blower motor cleininger HVAC 3 12-12-2006 07:55 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.