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Old 10-09-2008, 04:27 PM   #16
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low-voltage and electrical wiring sharing same stud space


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Why would you even use cat 6 or 7? Nothing supports it...



So did they actually run CL2 or CL3 speaker wire?



I've done tons of houses and the stereo guys run the their stuff pretty close to mine, its not an NEC issue, and most likely not a audio issue either, just some audio phile bone heads wetdream.
Cat 6 is supported with gigabit Ethernet. While Cat 5e will do it under ideal conditions it will not be optimum.

Cat 6 has different twist to the the twisted pairs and the whole bundled itself has a twist. Cat 6 will consistently have higher through put in most situations.

It's like putting a 120,000 btu furnace in a 1500 sq ft home. Will it work? Yes, but it will work hard to keep up.

Cat 5e will do gigabit but it doesn't do it well.

As for the hum on the speaker wires I have no idea what wire they ran. the hum was so noticeable that it was annoying.

House wiring will affect low voltage wiring there is no doubt about that.

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Old 10-09-2008, 04:37 PM   #17
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I'm about to provide potential wildly inaccurate and incomplete info so be warned. If you run speaker wire through the round things on the ends of USB cables (I have no what they are called and you have to cut them out of the USB cable) are supposed to stop the annoying noise that you get from a bluetooth phone bleeding into the speaker. It may work for buzzing speakers too. I can't remember why it works for bluetooth but I did read it somewhere and try it out and it seemed to work and I have no basis for thinking it would work for buzzing. I'm sure someone with a better understanding and a less fried brain would be able to confirm/deny this.
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:43 PM   #18
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low-voltage and electrical wiring sharing same stud space


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin Gardens View Post
Cat 6 is supported with gigabit Ethernet. While Cat 5e will do it under ideal conditions it will not be optimum.

Cat 6 has different twist to the the twisted pairs and the whole bundled itself has a twist. Cat 6 will consistently have higher through put in most situations.

It's like putting a 120,000 btu furnace in a 1500 sq ft home. Will it work? Yes, but it will work hard to keep up.

Cat 5e will do gigabit but it doesn't do it well.

Not arguing, just shedding some more light on the differences.
Cat5e vs Cat6


There is a great deal of debate among people about whether new cabling installations should use Cat5e or Cat6. Many people incorrectly assume that by running Cat6 they will then have a Gigabit Ethernet. However, in order to achieve true Gigabit Ethernet speeds, every single component on a network must be gigabit rated, such as the switches, hubs and network interface cards. This isn't to say that there aren't differences between Cat5e and Cat6, however. The general difference between category 5e and category 6 is in the transmission performance. While Cat5e can support gigabit speeds, Cat6 is certified to handle gigabit Ethernet. Additionally, the Cat6 specification is better suited toward environments that are generally unfriendly to twisted pair cabling. This includes areas that have lots of interference from things like power lines, lights, and manufacturing equipment. Still, for most applications, Cat5e is perfectly suitable and preferable to Cat6: it is more economical and performs almost as well. However, if you can be certain that all the components on your network are gigabit rated, and the volume of the data being transmitted calls for certified gigabit performance, then Cat6 is the way to go.
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:46 PM   #19
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low-voltage and electrical wiring sharing same stud space


Quote:
Originally Posted by jheavner
If you run speaker wire through the round things on the ends of USB cables (I have no what they are called and you have to cut them out of the USB cable)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_bead

You can buy 'em online.. your milage may vary though.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:09 PM   #20
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low-voltage and electrical wiring sharing same stud space


Quote:
Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
Not arguing, just shedding some more light on the differences.
Cat5e vs Cat6


There is a great deal of debate among people about whether new cabling installations should use Cat5e or Cat6. Many people incorrectly assume that by running Cat6 they will then have a Gigabit Ethernet. However, in order to achieve true Gigabit Ethernet speeds, every single component on a network must be gigabit rated, such as the switches, hubs and network interface cards. This isn't to say that there aren't differences between Cat5e and Cat6, however. The general difference between category 5e and category 6 is in the transmission performance. While Cat5e can support gigabit speeds, Cat6 is certified to handle gigabit Ethernet. Additionally, the Cat6 specification is better suited toward environments that are generally unfriendly to twisted pair cabling. This includes areas that have lots of interference from things like power lines, lights, and manufacturing equipment. Still, for most applications, Cat5e is perfectly suitable and preferable to Cat6: it is more economical and performs almost as well. However, if you can be certain that all the components on your network are gigabit rated, and the volume of the data being transmitted calls for certified gigabit performance, then Cat6 is the way to go.
Exactly.

I have seen systems set up for Cat6 and here is a 10/100 switch.....doh!!!!!
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:41 PM   #21
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low-voltage and electrical wiring sharing same stud space


Cat5e is rated for gigabit speeds up to 25 meters (approx 75 feet), beyond that and its anyone's guess how it will perform. When I wired my current house a couple years ago, I did it with Cat5e only because it was cheaper and I didn't foresee needing gigabit speeds at any of the connections that were longer than 25 meters. Most of the runs are 50 feet or less, since I was able to place my network rack centrally located in the basement and ran straight up the wall on the first floor into the attic, where it drops down to different areas.

As far as a hum or buzzing in a speaker, i'd recommend running shielded speaker wire rated for in-wall use. Most often people run zip cord (flat 2 wire cord) through the wall and it picks up a lot of interference.
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Old 10-06-2011, 12:16 PM   #22
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low-voltage and electrical wiring sharing same stud space


Have you seen the Littelfuse article http://www.newark.com/images/en_US/m...0Datalines.pdf on ESD protection of Ethernet datalines? It covers how suppressors with high capacitance can affect the data stream by distorting the data waveforms. Thought it might prove useful.

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