Light On Dryer Circuit - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-06-2011, 03:04 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 65
Rewards Points: 75
Default

light on dryer circuit


Please advise on the correct way to connect a lighting circuit to a dryer circuit.

We have a small (10x10) outbuildng where the previous owner ran 10-3 (red, black, white, ground) through a 1" rigid non metallic conduit to a small building (10x10') that is a short distance (<10') from the main house. The circuit is used for a dryer. We would like to have a small light in the area and do not want to pull another circuit from the house (while 1" conduit used, the routine is circuitous and pulling more will be a pain).

Is it possible to use one leg (red or black) of the 30A ciruiit to create a lighting circuit?

Thank you.

Advertisement

Steve Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2011, 03:21 PM   #2
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 5,964
Rewards Points: 2,324
Default

light on dryer circuit


NO. You need to install a 4 circuit sub panel, then feed the dryer and the light from the panel.

Advertisement

__________________
Yes I am a Pirate, 200 years too late. "Jimmy Buffett"

Last edited by jbfan; 06-06-2011 at 03:22 PM. Reason: spelling
jbfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2011, 05:04 PM   #3
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 8,055
Rewards Points: 2,908
Default

light on dryer circuit


The circuit should be dedicated to the dryer so IMO adding a subpanel would not be an option if the current setup is used. You could not run a new circuit to the outbuilding as the code prohibits multiple circuits going to outbuildings. You would need a feeder and a panel.

Your idea is incorrect because general purpose circuits for lighting and receptacles are prohibited from being greater than 20 amps.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2011, 11:45 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 65
Rewards Points: 75
Default

light on dryer circuit


Hmmmm...Two opposing opinions. How do i decide if, and how, to use an existing 30amp service to provide both power (for a dryer circuit) as well as a lighting circut?
Steve Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2011, 12:23 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Near Philly
Posts: 2,051
Rewards Points: 1,022
Default

light on dryer circuit


I dont' think they are opposing.
WOuldn't this building would need to be treated like a detached garage circuit fed by a subpanel and with its own ground rod, neutrals isolated from ground in subpanel?
bob22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2011, 02:25 PM   #6
A "Handy Husband"
 
rjniles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: South Carolina Low Country
Posts: 4,241
Rewards Points: 2,392
Default

light on dryer circuit


While it is not to code and I am sure I will be chastised for suggesting it but for a small load like a light:

I would install a small plug fuse holder (with a 15 amp plug fuse) in a 2 gang electrical box immediately next to the 30 amp dryer receptacle. Wire with a piece of 10-2 (a hot, neutral and ground) from the dryer receptacle to the new box. Connect the hot side to the fuse holder, wire the other side of the fuse holder to a switch in the same box. Wire from the switch to the light.
__________________
Location:
Coastal South Carolina
rjniles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2011, 02:32 PM   #7
Just call me Andrew
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 2,258
Rewards Points: 1,012
Default

light on dryer circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by bob22 View Post
I dont' think they are opposing.
WOuldn't this building would need to be treated like a detached garage circuit fed by a subpanel and with its own ground rod, neutrals isolated from ground in subpanel?
If he installs a subpanel, yes.

A subpanel, in my opinion, is the only viable option, and even that is questionable because of what Jim said. But I'd do that before doing what rjniles suggested.

Then again, if it were me, I'd run a new 60- or 100-amp service to the building, put a subpanel in (isolated neutrals) and drive ground rods.

Advertisement

__________________
Andrew


Last edited by secutanudu; 06-12-2011 at 02:35 PM.
secutanudu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to diagnose gas valve problems Nestor_Kelebay How To Guides 28 10-30-2013 05:19 PM
Tripping breakers,neutrals,120 volts and 240 volts OH My!!! Stubbie Electrical 17 06-11-2011 07:09 AM
Circuit trips with 2 light switches sylercider Electrical 3 12-05-2010 11:09 PM
Resource for understanding gas valve? darsunt HVAC 19 02-04-2009 12:08 AM
Can a GFCI protected light be installed into a normal light circuit? boongywoongy Electrical 6 05-19-2008 09:02 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts