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paisley13460 06-01-2011 10:55 PM

Kitchen GFI Circuit Breaker
 
How much ampere does a circuit breaker require for the kitchen GFIs?

kbsparky 06-01-2011 10:55 PM

Twenty

paisley13460 06-01-2011 10:57 PM

How come my electrical panel has two 20-amp circuit breakers for the kitchen?

Is there any reason for the extra one?

Jim Port 06-01-2011 10:59 PM

The code requires two 20 amp circuits to serve the countertops.

md2lgyk 06-02-2011 09:13 AM

What Jim said. Typically, every other receptacle will be powered from one breaker and the rest from the other. Or, alternately, the top of all the receptacles will be powered from one and the bottom from the other.

SD515 06-02-2011 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 659656)
What Jim said. Typically, every other receptacle will be powered from one breaker and the rest from the other. Or, alternately, the top of all the receptacles will be powered from one and the bottom from the other.

That's not a rule, nor is it typical in my area. I've seen where a counter top had 8 receptacles...one on one circuit, 7 on the other. Not the brightest idea, but that's the way it was, and it's still code.

gregzoll 06-02-2011 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 659499)
The code requires two 20 amp circuits to serve the countertops.

Actually for the Kitchen or food preparation area, with dining, it says that min. of 2 twenty amp GFCI circuits are required. Not just the counter only.

Jim Port 06-02-2011 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 659728)
Actually for the Kitchen or food preparation area, with dining, it says that min. of 2 twenty amp GFCI circuits are required. Not just the counter only.

You're correct. Sometimes I simplify the response too much.

jbfan 06-02-2011 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 659729)
You're correct. Sometimes I simplify the response too much.

Less typing that way!:laughing:

gregzoll 06-02-2011 12:41 PM

The problem with those writing the NEC, is they do not simply that statement about needed GFI circuits in the kitchen/food prep & dining areas. Someone would actually make a mint if they created a NEC rulebook in layman terms for the home handyman/diyer so it is clearer, without them screwing things up by not understanding. This is why of course this site is here, is so that all people can help each other, not just one group. A think tank is better than letting the fish swim with the sharks.

paisley13460 06-02-2011 01:08 PM

I think out of most of the replies, I maybe the only layman here.

For all you, electricians out there...

Without the reason because it's the CODE, can you explain to me why you would need 2 20-amp circuit breaker?

I have about 5 outlets in my kitchen. I only use 2 of them. I only have 2 small appliances attached to them and those appliances are only used for about 15 minutes.

What's the worst thing that will happen if only 1 20-amp circuit breaker serves the kitchen countertops (a separate circuit breaker for oven [2-50 amp], microwave [20 amp], dishwasher [15 amp], garbage disposal [15 amp])?

P.S. Electricians here are so informative. Bravo...

Jim Port 06-02-2011 01:24 PM

The reason for the two circuit is because typically the appliances are high draw like toaster ovens, coffee makers etc. Having two circuits cuts down on the tripping by having too many appliances on one circuit.

md2lgyk 06-02-2011 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SD515 (Post 659702)
That's not a rule, nor is it typical in my area. I've seen where a counter top had 8 receptacles...one on one circuit, 7 on the other. Not the brightest idea, but that's the way it was, and it's still code.

I know it's not a "rule" but I have seen it in several houses I've owned. I wired my current house, and used the "every other one" scheme.

SD515 06-02-2011 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 659784)
The reason for the two circuit is because typically the appliances are high draw like toaster ovens, coffee makers etc. Having two circuits cuts down on the tripping by having too many appliances on one circuit.

...and then having to use extention cords from other rooms just to power the countertop appliances. Then there's the issue of sticking a penny behind the edison fuse (done many years ago).

gregzoll 06-02-2011 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paisley13460 (Post 659773)
I think out of most of the replies, I maybe the only layman here.

For all you, electricians out there...

Without the reason because it's the CODE, can you explain to me why you would need 2 20-amp circuit breaker?

I have about 5 outlets in my kitchen. I only use 2 of them. I only have 2 small appliances attached to them and those appliances are only used for about 15 minutes.

What's the worst thing that will happen if only 1 20-amp circuit breaker serves the kitchen countertops (a separate circuit breaker for oven [2-50 amp], microwave [20 amp], dishwasher [15 amp], garbage disposal [15 amp])?

P.S. Electricians here are so informative. Bravo...

Think about it this way. My kitchen has a portable dishwasher, countertop microwave, we also have a countertop 5qt Roaster Oven, Crockpot, kitchen-aide mixer, toaster oven. Ever tried during Football season plug in a Crock-pot, 5qt roaster, use the microwave, do dishes? Breakers trip. We have three 20 amp circuits for our kitchen, which is two circuits for the counter, and one serving the Kitchen & Dining area. That is why you want min. two circuits, twice that is even better, depending on the size of the space. Mine is only 10x12, so it is small compared to a McMansion, which may be serviced by min. 6 20 amp circuits.


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