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Old 09-09-2012, 01:13 PM   #16
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
AFAIK there is no Class A GFI protection built into an AFCI breaker.
I always thought that Class A ground-fault circuit interrupters trip when the current to ground is 6 mA or greater. I was reading on the GE site that theirs is rated at 5 mA. I will try to find a link

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Old 09-09-2012, 01:19 PM   #17
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


I was referring to the GFI component of an AFCI breaker is Class B, not Class A.
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Old 09-09-2012, 01:20 PM   #18
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelArs View Post
I always thought that Class A ground-fault circuit interrupters trip when the current to ground is 6 mA or greater. I was reading on the GE site that theirs is rated at 5 mA. I will try to find a link
Only if you have combo AFCI then it possible but most case useally not unless you check the manufacter listing on them.

Straight AFCI's are not that low a mA rating at all typically 30 ma setting.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 09-09-2012, 01:39 PM   #19
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
I was referring to the GFI component of an AFCI breaker is Class B, not Class A.
Yes I understand To clarify, I thought I read on the GE site that their combo GFI/AFCI breaker was rated as 5mA for the GFI section of the breaker. I'll look through my browser history to see if I can find the link for you tonight.
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Old 09-09-2012, 04:44 PM   #20
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchelectrican View Post
Only if you have combo AFCI then it possible but most case useally not unless you check the manufacter listing on them.

Straight AFCI's are not that low a mA rating at all typically 30 ma setting.

Merci,
Marc
Combo AFCFI's do not relate as to whether there is GFI protection or not. A combination AFCI relates to both series arc and parallel arc protection.
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Old 09-09-2012, 05:42 PM   #21
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelArs View Post
To clarify, I thought I read on the GE site that their combo GFI/AFCI breaker was rated as 5mA for the GFI section of the breaker.
Hi Jim. I think this is where I read it:


Quote:
An AFCI can be used in conjunction with GFCI protection to provide both arcing fault protection as well as 5mA ground fault (user) protection. A common way to provide both types of protection is to use an AFCI circuit breaker and a GFCI receptacle. AFCIs can also incorporate 5mA GFCI protection into the same package.
It is shown here, under #5 (AFCI and GFCI Protection). Wouldn't 5mA automatically make it class A?
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Old 09-09-2012, 05:51 PM   #22
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelArs View Post
Hi Jim. I think this is where I read it:




It is shown here, under #5 (AFCI and GFCI Protection). Wouldn't 5mA automatically make it class A?
I highly question this. I have never seen an AFCI that also incorporates 5mA GFI protection.
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Old 09-09-2012, 06:25 PM   #23
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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I highly question this. I have never seen an AFCI that also incorporates 5mA GFI protection.
Maybe it's new...
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:32 PM   #24
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Maybe it's new...
If you can find it I'd check it out. We are usually the first ones to see the new stuff.
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:45 PM   #25
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


if whatever it is isnt at leastg $80, it aint both.

when i was doing my rewire, i searched in vain for such a device for Cutler Hammer CH panels.

there had been a product that had 5 ma gfci and 1st generation AFCI protection, but it was discontinued. There was never one that provided combination type AFCI (2nd generation afci now required by code) and 5 ma GFCI.

some bean counter like me decided that the price point for such a device would not generate enought units to justify the R&D and fixed costs. he/she was probably right
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:46 PM   #26
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That is interesting, I was lead to believe that GE was the only manufacturer to completely remove GFCI protection from the AFCI breakers.
Will have to ask my supply houses about this.
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:49 PM   #27
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Cutler Hammer didnt remove it, it just made it class B (30 ma). I believe that the 30ma is part of how it senses line-to-ground or neutral-to-ground arcs, but dont quote me on that
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:51 PM   #28
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After reading this, a few times, I believe they're talking about the GFCI receptacle providing the 5ma protection along with the arc protection of the AFCI breaker, not a combination AFCI/GFCI breaker
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:55 PM   #29
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Correct. we just digressed into the tech of AFCI breakers

this set up makes sense if one of the counter rec circuits does power receptacles in the dining room or breakfast room, where AFCI is required.

I ran one circuit (afci) for dining room and pantry and 2 circuits (regular, with gfci receptacles in the "first box") for my kitchen counters and walls.
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:00 PM   #30
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Cutler Hammer didnt remove it, it just made it class B (30 ma). I believe that the 30ma is part of how it senses line-to-ground or neutral-to-ground arcs, but dont quote me on that
Right, GE use to have 40ma GFCI protection, IF you had a ground touching the grounded conductor, it would trip the breaker when a load was applied.
A real hair-puller when you turn the light, or fan on, and it trips the breaker.
Someone being lazy pushing the receptacle in allowing the ground and grounded wire to make contact

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