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Old 09-08-2012, 08:55 PM   #1
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


I'm going to be expanding the kitchen soon and I'm looking for some clarification regarding recepticles. I read that in a kitchen GFCI protected receptacles are required for all receptacles that serve counter surfaces. I was also told that you should only have one GFCI per circuit breaker. So does this mean that every counter receptacle has to be on a dedicated line?

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Old 09-08-2012, 09:01 PM   #2
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


First part is right all countertop receptacles must be GFCI protected.


But you can put as many GFCI Receptacles on a single circuit as you want.


The only time there is sometime a problem is when you wire additional GFCI receptacles off of the 'Load' Terminals of a GFCI.

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Old 09-08-2012, 09:04 PM   #3
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


The point is you only NEED one GFI at the beginning of a circuit IF you want to protect everything downstream from it.
If you want for any reason you can also have a GFI at each location you need protection. This can get expensive though.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:20 PM   #4
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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Originally Posted by Techy View Post
First part is right all countertop receptacles must be GFCI protected.


But you can put as many GFCI Receptacles on a single circuit as you want.


The only time there is sometime a problem is when you wire additional GFCI receptacles off of the 'Load' Terminals of a GFCI.
THANKS for the clarification Techy

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The point is you only NEED one GFI at the beginning of a circuit IF you want to protect everything downstream from it.
So it would make more sense to just use a GFCI circuit breaker and have (for example) 3 or 4 receptacles dedicated to it?
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:40 PM   #5
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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THANKS for the clarification Techy


So it would make more sense to just use a GFCI circuit breaker and have (for example) 3 or 4 receptacles dedicated to it?
IMO it makes more sense to use a GFCI receptacle at the beginniing of a sereis of 3 or 4 subsequent receps.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:41 PM   #6
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


If the breaker were to trip you need to go to the panel to reset it. If the GFI trips you can reset it while still in the kitchen. Also the receptacle is <$15, while the breaker is around $40.
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Last edited by Jim Port; 09-08-2012 at 09:59 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:44 PM   #7
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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IMO it makes more sense to use a GFCI receptacle at the beginniing of a sereis of 3 or 4 subsequent receps.

Whats the reasoning for this? Are GFCI receptacles quicker to respond than GFCI breakers (because the breakers are spaced further away from the receptacles)?
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:46 PM   #8
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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Also the receptacle is <$15, while the breaker is around $40.
That's a good point
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:50 PM   #9
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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...Are GFCI receptacles quicker to respond than GFCI breakers (because the breakers are spaced further away from the receptacles)?
Actually, the opposite is true: I've found that the trip time curve is much faster with the breakers than the receptacles.
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:52 PM   #10
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


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Whats the reasoning for this? Are GFCI receptacles quicker to respond than GFCI breakers (because the breakers are spaced further away from the receptacles)?
There is no difference in the response! Its just more cost effective to use a GFCI receptical in the first outlet and then standard recepticals down stream from this!

As Techy noted, you may use as many GFCI receps on a circuit as you want. However this is less cost effective also!

Last edited by Wildie; 09-08-2012 at 09:56 PM.
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Old 09-08-2012, 10:04 PM   #11
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


OK THANKS guys! This has helped A LOT!

One other question regarding this; can I still use a AFCI breaker if I use GFCI receptacles? I'm concerned about nuisance tripping...
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Old 09-08-2012, 10:46 PM   #12
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


you can put a gfci rec on an afci circuit. your chances of nuisance tripping are probably higher but not enough not to do it this way

no one has mentioned this, but modern kitchen codes require 2 circuits to serve countertops, including refrigeration equipment. this is a minimum. consider adding dedicated circuits for things like large microwaves. also no lighting on these kitchen small appliance circuits. Add a separate circuit for a fixed in place dishwasher (can be shared with disposal circuit in most cases or run a circuit for disposer). countertop circuis can also serve kitchen wall receptacles and receptacles in dining room, pantry, etc.

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Old 09-08-2012, 11:15 PM   #13
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you can put a gfci rec on an afci circuit. your chances of nuisance tripping are probably higher but not enough not to do it this way
Would I get less nuisance tripping if the GFCI was built into the AFCI breaker?

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consider adding dedicated circuits for things like large microwaves.
I did this one last year. It's a dedicated GFCI for the microwave.

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Add a separate circuit for a fixed in place dishwasher (can be shared with disposal circuit in most cases
This GFCI has the dishwasher, disposal and water filtration on it.
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Old 09-09-2012, 06:13 AM   #14
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


AFAIK there is no Class A GFI protection built into an AFCI breaker. It is all Class B and does not satisfy for the kitchen.
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Old 09-09-2012, 06:51 AM   #15
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Kitchen GFCI Protected Receptacles


It is quite straightforward to put a ground fault circuit interrupter duplex receptacle in the first outlet box and continue GFCI protection downstream to additional outlet boxes. For the two kitchen circuits, put one GFCI in box 1 and leapfrog from the GFCI load terminals to ordinary receptacles in boxes 3 and 5. Put another GFCI in box 2 and leapfrog to boxes 4 and 6.

*************

Except a complication arises if you are using a multiwire branch circuit (two hots and one neutral). Here, when a GFCI receptacle is installed, separate cables are needed to continue protection from that GFCI and also continue the rest of the MWBC past that box. Giving each outlet box its own GFCI receptacle is an alternative that works fine with the MWBC.

Variation: MWBC from ordinary double wide breaker pair in panel to box 1 with GFCI. Leapfrog with 12-2 cable from load terminals to box 3. Use 12-2 cable to take just the other half of the MWBC to box 2 where you put the other GFCI. Leapfrog to box 4. (Beyond box 1 you treat the MWBC as two separate circuits (subcircuits).

Another complication arises in some cities where the two halves of a duplex receptacle must be powered by separate circuits, namely the two respective circuits needed for the kitchen receptacles. Here you must use a GFCI breaker.

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Last edited by AllanJ; 09-09-2012 at 07:02 AM.
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