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kahuna 22 06-07-2012 04:16 PM

kitchen electrical
 
what kitchen appliances need dedicated electrical breakers

kahuna 22 06-07-2012 04:19 PM

how about the refrigerator

stickboy1375 06-07-2012 04:22 PM

Well, to keep this clean and simple, in a nutshell, if the manufacture of the appliance requires a dedicated circuit, then you don't have an option.... other wise I use the loads on the name plates and whether they are fastened in place or not to determine what gets what for circuits.

dmxtothemax 06-07-2012 05:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kahuna 22 (Post 938486)
what kitchen appliances need dedicated electrical breakers

Some large draw loads could require dedicated circuits.

Some others are required by code.
Which would vary depending on locality.

To which one are you referring ?

gregzoll 06-07-2012 05:45 PM

Making it simple: Electric Stove or electric oven needs its own, Dishwasher can share the same breaker for the garbage disposal if there is one, or also with a trash compactor, as long as all three together do not exceed the total amount of amps for the circuit. Microwave needs its own, whether it is a over the range, or counter top that sits on a shelf, or somewhere on the counter. Fridge can share either off of the Branch circuit that does the counters, gas stove can also share off of the counter branch circuit. Lighting needs to be on its own circuit, but can share off of other rooms.

The branch circuits for the counters can also do the baseboard outlets, dining area, pantry, can not feed any other rooms in the house.

stickboy1375 06-07-2012 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kahuna 22 (Post 938486)
what kitchen appliances need dedicated electrical breakers

Its really a vague question... without looking at the appliances, your guess is as good as ours...

gregzoll 06-07-2012 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 938593)
Its really a vague question... without looking at the appliances, your guess is as good as ours...

Not vague. See post above yours. Simple question, especially for Kitchens, is about the easiest to answer, since it is already spelled out in the NEC regarding SWBC & Kitchens, along with beaten to the death on this forum, that the horse has nothing else to give.

stickboy1375 06-07-2012 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 938605)
Not vague. See post above yours. Simple question, especially for Kitchens, is about the easiest to answer, since it is already spelled out in the NEC regarding SWBC & Kitchens, along with beaten to the death on this forum, that the horse has nothing else to give.

I don't see how you can determine a branch circuit with out a nameplate, but guess thats how you roll, just like your imaginary dedicated circuit for a microwave, how bout a code reference on that one....

joed 06-07-2012 07:00 PM

Where do you live? I Canada the fridge is required to be dedicated.

gregzoll 06-07-2012 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 938613)
I don't see how you can determine a branch circuit with out a nameplate, but guess thats how you roll, just like your imaginary dedicated circuit for a microwave, how bout a code reference on that one....

It is not imaginary for a dedicated circuit for the mic. Modern microwaves NEED their own circuit, because of the amount of current draw they alone make. Even without a nameplate, again it is spelled out in the NEC as to what guidelines for requiring WHAT needs a dedicated or does not need a dedicated circuit, and to what you can and can not do with the Small Appliance branch circuit for the Kitchen/dining area/pantry. Nothing imaginary about it, but in your world.

Btw, a 1,000 watt mic draws 8.3 amps when it is on. But hey, if you want to share with that load while it is on, have fun running back and forth resetting the breaker. Now of course, if you are like me, you take the second SWBC and use it for the mic, because in my small kitchen, I only need one circuit for both counters, and can always go and make a small change downstairs ahead of time, if I need to break it out to a third circuit.

stickboy1375 06-08-2012 06:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 938688)
It is not imaginary for a dedicated circuit for the mic. Modern microwaves NEED their own circuit, because of the amount of current draw they alone make. Even without a nameplate, again it is spelled out in the NEC as to what guidelines for requiring WHAT needs a dedicated or does not need a dedicated circuit, and to what you can and can not do with the Small Appliance branch circuit for the Kitchen/dining area/pantry. Nothing imaginary about it, but in your world.

Btw, a 1,000 watt mic draws 8.3 amps when it is on. But hey, if you want to share with that load while it is on, have fun running back and forth resetting the breaker. Now of course, if you are like me, you take the second SWBC and use it for the mic, because in my small kitchen, I only need one circuit for both counters, and can always go and make a small change downstairs ahead of time, if I need to break it out to a third circuit.

lol... so in your words, A microwave doesn't require a dedicated circuit, YOU just choose to supply one... thats fine and dandy.....

And I know what the NEC requires... and it's not a dedicated circuit. ;) Hence the title of the OP's topic.

gregzoll 06-08-2012 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 938950)
lol... so in your words, I microwave doesn't require a dedicated circuit, YOU just choose to supply one... thats fine and dandy.....

And I know what the NEC requires... and it's not a dedicated circuit. ;) Hence the title of the OP's topic.

Again, cite the section that states your opinion. Sorry, but as already mentioned a 1,000 watt microwave uses 8.3 amps. Anyone that is smart or has half a brain, will give it its own dedicated outlet.

k_buz 06-08-2012 07:50 AM

Show us the CODE that it does.

Jim Port 06-08-2012 08:08 AM

I am glad the NEC does not call for a dedicated circuit for a countertop microwave. Can you see trying to decide where it would go on the counter when doing the install? Wait, the HO doesn't want it there so you need to rewire?

Side note: my 1450 watt MW drawing 13.5A is incorrectly installed on a 15 amp lighting circuit and rarely trips the breaker. I am not endorsing this practice and plan to change it, but it is a low priority at the end of the day.

curiousB 06-08-2012 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 938613)
I don't see how you can determine a branch circuit with out a nameplate, but guess thats how you roll, just like your imaginary dedicated circuit for a microwave, how bout a code reference on that one....


Wow for someone who just joined the forum that's an aggressive tone. Take a pill and dial it back some. Everyone is just trying to help out here. Last time I checked there were no salaries being paid to anyone.


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