Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-03-2011, 08:14 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 4
Share |
Default

Kitchen electric question


First let me start by saying HELLO. I'm a new member here and look forward to participating on this site.

I am remodeling my in-laws kitchen. I will be tearing out all the electrical and rewiring everything as it is very old and SCARY!!! I wanna make sure I wire everything to code so I have no problems. I live in NY. How many gfci can be on one 20amp circuit? Does the fridge have to be a dedicated 15 or 20 amp line? Does an over the range microwave have to be on a dedicated line? if so 15 or 20 amp? Also how about the dishwasher, does that have to have a dedicated line as well, and is there a code for amps or should I just see what the manufacture recommends?

Thanks

mack1703 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 08:57 PM   #2
Retired from the grind
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Midwest - Central Illinois
Posts: 13,870
Default

Kitchen electric question


Have you made sure that you can perform the scope of the work. Most places will not allow a third party who may not be licensed to do remodeling work, or electric work for a home owner.

As for the GFCI, you only need either one breaker in the breaker panel, or one GFCI per Small Appliance Branch Circuits, that has to be no less than 2 circuits in the Food Preparation area, dining room, or pantry, and they can not serve any other areas in the home. That means that if you want wall outlets 14" aprx above the floor, those do not have to be GFCI protected, but they can be protected by AFCI breakers if under 2011 NEC, if the area you want to perform the work in has adopted it, but most locales have their own rules and reg's.

Any other questions, if you have a iPhone, you can download the 2008 NEC from McGraw Hill for $75 through the Apple App store. If you wish a hard copy, you can purchase the 2011 either at a Barnes & Noble, or through http://www.nfpa.org/index.asp?cookie_test=1 Also, the 2011 is available to look at on the nfpa.org website.

gregzoll is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
mack1703 (09-04-2011)
Old 09-03-2011, 09:03 PM   #3
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Default

Kitchen electric question


Quote:
Originally Posted by mack1703 View Post
First let me start by saying HELLO. I'm a new member here and look forward to participating on this site.

I am remodeling my in-laws kitchen. I will be tearing out all the electrical and rewiring everything as it is very old and SCARY!!! I wanna make sure I wire everything to code so I have no problems. I live in NY. How many gfci can be on one 20amp circuit? Does the fridge have to be a dedicated 15 or 20 amp line? Does an over the range microwave have to be on a dedicated line? if so 15 or 20 amp? Also how about the dishwasher, does that have to have a dedicated line as well, and is there a code for amps or should I just see what the manufacture recommends?

Thanks
I hope you did get the permit for this due once you open the wall you have to bring it up to the modern codes.

For countertop receptales genrally 2 circuits will serve this unless you have alot of hevey power appalinces on the countertop then add more circuits as need to. { 20 amp circuits }

Fridge can be it own circuit { check with your local codes reguarding of GFCI or not I belive they do required it anyway }

Over the hood Microwave always it own circuit and it will be 20 amp circuit.

For dishwasher it can be either 15 or 20 amp circuit few area you can have garbage dispoal on the same circuit as long it is not over 50% of the rated circuit otherwise MWBC circuit for two appalices I mention will take care of it and pay attetion about the disconnect switch { if your local code do required it }

Keep the lighting circuit seperated from the other items I listed above.

Do you have gaz or electrique stove ? if latter if you going to relocated the stove receptale then you have no choice but go with 4 conductor type this is allready written in the NEC code for pretty long time now.

Merci,
Marc
__________________
The answer will be based on NEC ( National Electrical code ) or CEC ( Cananda Electrical code ) or ECF ( Electrique Code France )
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to frenchelectrican For This Useful Post:
mack1703 (09-04-2011)
Old 09-04-2011, 07:49 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 4
Default

Kitchen electric question


Thanks for the tips guys. I didnt know I would need a permit to redo an existing kitchen when im not moving any walls.
mack1703 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2011, 08:14 AM   #5
I=E/R
 
a7ecorsair's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,052
Default

Kitchen electric question


Quote:
Originally Posted by mack1703 View Post
Thanks for the tips guys. I didnt know I would need a permit to redo an existing kitchen when im not moving any walls.
Once you start this you will most likely have to bring all the circuits in the kitchen up to current code. Dedicated circuits like you mentioned will need their own breaker. What is in the house for a main panel and do you have unused breaker spaces?
a7ecorsair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2011, 08:17 AM   #6
Retired from the grind
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Midwest - Central Illinois
Posts: 13,870
Default

Kitchen electric question


Quote:
Originally Posted by mack1703 View Post
Thanks for the tips guys. I didnt know I would need a permit to redo an existing kitchen when im not moving any walls.
You are a third party, and it does not matter if you are not moving walls, you still have to abide to rules. My city says that I the home owner can do my own electric, but if I do it for someone else, I have to pass their test, and pull a permit.
gregzoll is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
mack1703 (09-04-2011)
Old 09-04-2011, 09:27 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,864
Default

Kitchen electric question


You may also need a general construction permit to redo the walls now that you tore them open. If so, floors and ceilings would be included with that permit.
__________________
Stop wasting time re-adjusting the pattern. Have several lawn sprinklers, one for each pattern.
AllanJ is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to AllanJ For This Useful Post:
mack1703 (09-04-2011)
Old 09-04-2011, 09:52 AM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 4
Default

Kitchen electric question


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
You are a third party, and it does not matter if you are not moving walls, you still have to abide to rules. My city says that I the home owner can do my own electric, but if I do it for someone else, I have to pass their test, and pull a permit.
I guess I never thought of it like that. It does make sense.

I am having a licensed electrician come to do a service upgrade from 100amp to 200amp so I think I may have him do the kitchen as well so I dont have any issues down the road.

Thanks again all
mack1703 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2011, 09:59 AM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 4
Default

Kitchen electric question


Quote:
Originally Posted by a7ecorsair View Post
Once you start this you will most likely have to bring all the circuits in the kitchen up to current code. Dedicated circuits like you mentioned will need their own breaker. What is in the house for a main panel and do you have unused breaker spaces?

I planned on redoing all the circuits. I do have limited breaker space available in the 100 am panel, however Im having the service upgraded to 200amp so panel space wont be an issue. I wouldnt dare attempt a service upgrade myself nor trust someone unlicensed too do so. Im pretty sure Im gonna have a licensed electrician do the kitchen as well to avoid any problems down the road.

mack1703 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
kitchen floor framing with 2 x 6 question graysqwrl Building & Construction 1 07-13-2011 04:07 PM
DIY Kitchen Island Plumbing question - 2 bayin Plumbing 3 03-28-2011 08:29 AM
Electric Mat Radiant Floor Heating Question ryan5068 Flooring 14 09-03-2010 10:37 AM
Kitchen Sink Moved - new kitchen sleepysmurf Plumbing 1 08-10-2010 06:38 AM
Urgent Kitchen flooring question!! TravisBlake Flooring 4 06-02-2010 09:57 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.