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Old 04-29-2012, 09:50 PM   #1
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Kitchen circuits and receptacles


We are just beginning to start with our kitchen remodel. Today, I mapped out all the circuits and this is what I found.

Circuit # 7 - 20 amp circuit to 1 back splash outlet then to 3 kitchen wall outlets, then to a closet outlet and closet ceiling light and then to a side porch light!

Circuit # 8 - 20 amp to Dishwasher and Disposal

Circuit # 9 - 20 amp circuit to microwave and kitchen ceiling lights. 2 patio recessed lights and dining room ceiling light.

Circuit # 12 - 20 amp circuit to another back splash outlet then to 2 dining room wall outlets.

Circuit # 14 - 20 amp to Refrigerator only

Circuit # 18 - 15 amp to GFCI outlet in garage then that feeds 3 outlets for 3 bathroom outlets and 1 outside patio outlet.

I going to have to add 1 more back splash outlet due to increase in counter space. I'll put the microwave on a dedicated circuit. So I need 2 additional breakers but I only have 1 blank spot in the breaker panel. I guess I can add one of those slim tandem breakers.

So my question, is it ok to have additional wall outlets on the same circuit as a back splash outlet? If it's ok I'll lighten up circuit # 7 by putting some of those wall outlets on the additional back splash outlet.
Oh, I have 2 20 amp circuits I did not get identified yet! I'll get to those tomorrow.

thanks!

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Old 04-29-2012, 09:58 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by fredm54 View Post
So my question, is it ok to have additional wall outlets on the same circuit as a back splash outlet?
First... learn the correct terms and why they're used.
The kitchen requires no less than two 20 amp SMALL APPLIANCE curcuits
in addition to the dedicated circuits for known uses (like refrigerator, microwave, dishwasher, lighting, etc).

Back to the drawing board!
some helpful reading material HERE

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Old 04-30-2012, 06:26 AM   #3
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Kitchen circuits and receptacles


As suggested two 20A, GFCI protected countertop(appliance) circuits, that serve nothing else.

Some disagree about a dedicated refrigerator ckt. If it is connected also to a light, if the circuit trips out for some reason, you are more likely to notice it before food might spoil. If you are like most families, where the fridg door is open more than it is closed, not an issue. Assuming that you understand there might be a problem if the fridg light does not work
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:34 AM   #4
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As suggested two 20A, GFCI protected countertop(appliance) circuits, that serve nothing else.
This is false. Counter top recepts can be on with dining room outlets, dinette outlets, or other kitchen outlets.

As for tandem breakers, your panel would have to be rated to allow tandem breakers. Not all panels are.

I would come off the fridge to add the one counter top outlet, and run a separate micro circuit.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:15 AM   #5
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When I redid my Kitchen, which is still a work in progress, the Fridge is on the circuit that feeds the dining room outlets, and the outlet that feeds the gas stove 120v for the ignitor and clock. I have a dedicated for the microwave, a dedicated for the disposer, dedicated for the lighting, then two 20 amp branch circuits that feed the counters. One on one side of the kitchen, one on the other side.

Starting out, how big is your Kitchen, and does the dining room adjoin? In other words, you do not have to go into a hallway to get to it. Can you post a drawing of the floor plan of your home, so that it gives everyone a good idea of what you are dealing with? You can also do a image look up on Yahoo or Google, for SABC or Kitchen circuits, and it will give you the same that is in the NEC.
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:04 PM   #6
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Kitchen circuits and receptacles


In regards to SA kitchen circuits K_buz is correct. You must have at least two 20amp small appliance circuits supplying the kitchen. Each circuit should service the counter tops but can feed other outlets. It's better to limit the amount that will be on those SA circuits though (by not overly feeding other rooms/lights etc, etc) if possible....

This is how I've been required to do it and you can visit THIS thread at Mike Holts for the same topic. Post #19 is a good reference.

The dishwasher/disposal need to be on a dedicated 20amp circuit as well as the microwave; a refrigerator doesn't require a dedicated circuit but it all depends on manufacturer specifications.

Good luck

Last edited by Ralph III; 04-30-2012 at 12:10 PM.
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:38 PM   #7
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The dishwasher/disposal need to be on a dedicated 20amp circuit as well as the microwave; a refrigerator doesn't require a dedicated circuit but it all depends on manufacturer specifications.

Good luck
i don't believe the dishwasher, disposal and microwave explicitly need dedicated circuits, unless required by the manufacturer or for loading reasons.
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Old 04-30-2012, 01:58 PM   #8
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i don't believe the dishwasher, disposal and microwave explicitly need dedicated circuits, unless required by the manufacturer or for loading reasons.
Hello,
I only noted there "must be" two 20amp dedicated circuits in the kitchen as per code.

I never said the dishwasher/disposal/microwave were "explicity" required by code to be on dedicated circuits. However, many manufacturers do require such and as there are Code limitations of ampacity on circuits.

I only stated "they need to be" on dedicated circuits and as the OP will find most manufacturers do suggest/require in those instances. OTR microwaves require a lot of power as they can serve as both microwaves and convection ovens as well as venting the range. I would recommend a dedicated circuit but again, "...depends on manufacturer specifications".

God Bless

Last edited by Ralph III; 04-30-2012 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 04-30-2012, 02:06 PM   #9
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Kitchen circuits and receptacles


oh, i would recommend dedicated circuits as well. i was just pointing out the code doesn't explicitly require it (unless the manufacturer does).
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Old 04-30-2012, 02:07 PM   #10
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The small appliance receptacle circuits like #7 in your post cannot have lighting on it. It is for receptacles only.
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:08 PM   #11
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Did a little checking today. There's a 12-3 wg romex where 1 circuit is for the refrigerator only and the other circuit is for 1 of the small appliance circuits!

There's another 12-3 wg romex where 1 circuit is for the dishwasher and disposal and the other circuit is for the other small appliance circuit!

So for each 12-3 there's only one neutral to carry both loads, I assume this is wrong?

thanks!
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:21 PM   #12
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A properly wired MWBC (multi-wire branch circuit) is two hots sharing a common neutral. The two hots need to be on opposite legs of the panel.

A two pole breaker will assure that the two hots are on opposite legs.
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:21 PM   #13
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Nope, perfectly fine as long as each circuit is on separate phases in the panel.
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Old 07-24-2012, 01:00 PM   #14
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Kitchen is almost done and since we just picked the granite I had to delay the purchase of the SA outlets.

I have two outlets on one 20a SA circuit and another two outlets on another 20a circuit. I'm going to use a Gfci for each outlet.

Here's a silly question, does each outlet have to be the 20a variety?

Thanks!

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