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Russell 07-04-2011 07:26 PM

Kitchen circuits
 
Kitchen remodel, how many circuits (20 amp) and to what is common today? Was planning on one for fridge, dishwasher and disposal. Two for outlets on counter tops. One for microwave and igniters for gas stove. Overhead pendant lights on same circuit as dining room light.

brric 07-04-2011 08:07 PM

1. Refrigerator 15 or 20 amp.
2. Dishwasher combined with disposal 20 amp.
3.Microwave combined with ignitor 20 amp.
4. Two(2) 20 amp small appliance branch circuits for countertops.

SD515 07-04-2011 08:15 PM

Agreed.

Suggest balancing the countertop receptacles. Don’t do what they did in my house. Put 1 cntr-top recpt on one circuit, 7 on the other.

gregzoll 07-04-2011 08:42 PM

I have the following:

1 15a for dining & kitchen lights (3 fixtures)
1 20a for baseboard wall outlets for Kitchen & Dining area (6 outlets)
1 15a for Dispoall
1 20a for outlet for Countertop Microwave (GFCI outlet)
1 20a for 2 countertop outlets (GFCI).

frenchelectrican 07-05-2011 12:55 AM

Tyically 4 or more circuit is common with the kitchen area but for small kitchen or bare bone set up 2 circuits { per NEC codé minuim requirement }


My kitchen in Wisconsin have 7 circuits including a 240 volt circuit for tea kettle { just don't start discuss on this part so leave it out }

In France it typically 3 or more circuit depending on size.

Merci,
Marc

bobelectric 07-05-2011 04:12 AM

If you can, put in plenty.

Russell 07-06-2011 07:23 PM

Thanks for the great answers. Will get busy this weekend to get ready for elec, plumbing and gas inspections.

electures 07-09-2011 12:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Russell (Post 679866)
Kitchen remodel, how many circuits (20 amp) and to what is common today? Was planning on one for fridge, dishwasher and disposal. Two for outlets on counter tops. One for microwave and igniters for gas stove. Overhead pendant lights on same circuit as dining room light.

Without knowing electrical specs for disposal and D/W, run dedicated circuit for each. Check D/W installation instructions for electrical requirements. Avoid putting disposal and D/W on same circuit. Disposal is a motor.

Dedicated 15 or 20a circuit to frig and M/W. Built-in M/W's do not require GFI protection. Frig does not require GFI either. At least 2 20 amp small appliance circuits to counter top receptacles. All counter top receptacles require GFI protection. No lighting on 20a small appliance branch circuits.

mystic_cobra 07-30-2011 10:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electures (Post 682409)
Without knowing electrical specs for disposal and D/W, run dedicated circuit for each. Check D/W installation instructions for electrical requirements. Avoid putting disposal and D/W on same circuit. Disposal is a motor.

Dedicated 15 or 20a circuit to frig and M/W. Built-in M/W's do not require GFI protection. Frig does not require GFI either. At least 2 20 amp small appliance circuits to counter top receptacles. All counter top receptacles require GFI protection. No lighting on 20a small appliance branch circuits.

I am finishing up the wiring in my kitchen remodel and I have a question about this same setup specifically about the last statement regarding adding lights to a small appliance circuit...
I have all of the circuits in place as suggested above. I need to add two pairs of over-bar pendant lights over the bars I'm adding to the kitchen. One pair switched on each of two opposite walls. It seems dumb to add these to the 15A lighting circuit which already has 7 recessed lights, a ceiling fan/light combo, dining room chandelier, plus three outlets in the adjacent family room (end table lamps). I've done the math and even with all the lights on, I'm still okay. The 20A small appliance circuit will power a toaster and a blender a few times per month. Most likely these two appliances will never run at the same time. It just seems silly to have this appliance circuit that is so underutilized.
I have a third 20A circuit (GFCI protected via receptacle) in the kitchen that has two receptacles. Only thing connected will be a 1600W microwave. Can I (should I) put these two sets of switched lights on this circuit instead of the lighting circuit?

SD515 07-31-2011 08:46 AM

Lighting is not allowed on the small appliance branch circuits. Doesn’t matter how many you have, or how ‘under-utilized’ there are. SABC’s for kitchens can only supply receptacles, and only in the kitchen, dining rooms, pantrys, etc. associated with that kitchen. No other outlets are allowed on them (a receptacle is not an outlet).

mystic_cobra 07-31-2011 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SD515 (Post 697263)
Lighting is not allowed on the small appliance branch circuits. Doesn’t matter how many you have, or how ‘under-utilized’ there are. SABC’s for kitchens can only supply receptacles, and only in the kitchen, dining rooms, pantrys, etc. associated with that kitchen. No other outlets are allowed on them (a receptacle is not an outlet).

Thanks for the reply. Now I'm confused. I thought an outlet was the same thing as a receptacle. What's the difference?

receptacle?
http://www.vancouverrealtor.biz/21.gif

outlet?
http://image.shutterstock.com/displa...d-13523530.jpg

SD515 07-31-2011 09:16 AM

2008 NEC definitions:

Outlet: A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment. Layman’s terms: A point where electricity can be tapped to supply equipment. Junction boxes, switch boxes, light boxes, etc. An outlet box does not necessarily need to have a device installed in/on it.

Receptacle: A receptacle is a contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug. A single receptacle is a single contact device with no other contact device on the same yoke. A multiple receptacle is two or more contact devices on the same yoke. Layman’s terms: A device that a cord cap can be plugged into to receive power.

mystic_cobra 07-31-2011 09:36 AM

Ok, so would it be correct to say, "an outlet is a box in a circuit where a receptacle or switch may be installed".

Would that be correct?

So, what properties define a kitchen SABC. Is it any circuit with receptacles above a kitchen counter? Any circuit with receptacles in a kitchen?

gregzoll 07-31-2011 09:40 AM

It can only be in the Kitchen & Dining area. Basically where food is prepared & eaten in the home. Of course, most people eat in their living rooms, home offices, outside also. This circuit can not feed other rooms in the home (ie hallway, basement, bedroom, living room, etc.).

SD515 07-31-2011 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mystic_cobra (Post 697265)
Thanks for the reply. Now I'm confused. I thought an outlet was the same thing as a receptacle. What's the difference?

receptacle?
http://www.vancouverrealtor.biz/21.gif

Above is a picture of one type of receptacle
Quote:

Originally Posted by mystic_cobra (Post 697265)

This is a picture of a receptacle with its cover plate installed. The outlet is what the receptacle is mounted in.


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