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Old 02-24-2013, 03:24 AM   #1
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Hi there,

Have a couple of questions on NEC wiring requirements and options on dishwasher/disposal/refrigerator.


1. Wonder where I can locate the latest minimum NEC requirements online for the wiring of disposal/dishwasher/refrigerator.


2. For Dishwasher/Disposal,

Is it an NEC requirement to have a dedicated circuit for each?

Here are some ideas I have:

2a.

- Dishwasher : dedicated 15A circuit
- Disposal : on a shared 20A circuit

The disposal has a 6Amp rating. So, can I -- for example, put the disposal on a 20A circuit -- that's shared with the other receptacles along the same side of the kitchen wall? Is that still considered compliant with NEC requirement?


2b. Dishwasher and Disposal shared in a single 20A circuit (no other shared)

The dishwasher has the following info:
motor 6.5A
heater 5.0A
max load: 11.0A

Would this break the NEC requirement?


3. For the refrigerator,

If the refrigerator's label states 15A rating, is is safe to put it on a dedicated 15A circuit, or current surge during startup would cause > 15A current and would cause a trip on the 15A breaker so I should put it on a 20A circuit? Which is the right circuit breaker size for NEC requirement in this case?




Last edited by joemc3; 02-24-2013 at 04:18 AM.
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Old 02-24-2013, 05:56 AM   #2
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


I am not a professional (not a professional electrician anyway), so I can't quote chapter and verse from the NEC. Our house was built four years ago. The refrigerator is on a dedicated 20A circuit, even though its label says it draws less than 4A. The dishwasher is on a dedicated 15A circuit. We have no disposal. I don't think anything but outlets can be on a small appliance circuit.

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Old 02-24-2013, 06:08 AM   #3
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Hi there,

Have a couple of questions on NEC wiring requirements and options on dishwasher/disposal/refrigerator.


1. Wonder where I can locate the latest minimum NEC requirements online for the wiring of disposal/dishwasher/refrigerator.
You might be able to Goggle yoy question
2. For Dishwasher/Disposal,

Is it an NEC requirement to have a dedicated circuit for each?
Dishwashers do not have to be on a dedicated circuit, according to NEC codes. Neither do refrigerators. Electric Ranges and OTR Microwave Hoods and Hood Fans do.

Here are some ideas I have:

2a.

- Dishwasher : dedicated 15A circuit
- Disposal : on a shared 20A circuit

The disposal has a 6Amp rating. So, can I -- for example, put the disposal on a 20A circuit -- that's shared with the other receptacles along the same side of the kitchen wall? Is that still considered compliant with NEC requirement?
Install a 20 amp circuit and connect both DW and GD on it. Install breaker lock on CB

2b. Dishwasher and Disposal shared in a single 20A circuit (no other shared)

The dishwasher has the following info:
motor 6.5A
heater 5.0A
max load: 11.0A

Would this break the NEC requirement?
NO

3. For the refrigerator,

If the refrigerator's label states 15A rating, is is safe to put it on a dedicated 15A circuit, or current surge during startup would cause > 15A current and would cause a trip on the 15A breaker so I should put it on a 20A circuit? Which is the right circuit breaker size for NEC requirement in this case?

It can be installed on 15 amp circuit. I would install a 20 amp circuit.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:01 AM   #4
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


If you want to do it, the frig is allowed to be on one of the required SABC's per the NEC.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:07 AM   #5
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


According to the NEC and the specs you posted, the dishwasher will need its own circuit.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:21 AM   #6
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


You can not share the dishwasher or the garbage disposal with the 20 amp counter receptacles. You can share the refrigerator with the 20 amp counter circuit.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:43 AM   #7
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


I always put fridge on dedicated 20 amp circuit. Much better in my opinion. And if both dishwasher and disposal exist I do a 20 amp MWBC with double pole breaker and receptacle for both.

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Old 02-24-2013, 08:49 AM   #8
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Quote:
Originally Posted by rrolleston View Post
I always put fridge on dedicated 20 amp circuit. Much better in my opinion. And if both dishwasher and disposal exist I do a 20 amp MWBC with double pole breaker and receptacle for both.

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There is absolutely no need for a separate 20 Amp circuit for any of these appliances in this case.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:09 AM   #9
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Just the way I do it in case of future expansion or new larger appliances.

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Old 02-24-2013, 09:12 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrolleston View Post
Just the way I do it in case of future expansion or new larger appliances.

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I've never seen a residential disposal or dishwasher require a 20A circuit. I've seen fridges that require a circuit that large, but those are usually a sub zero type fridge that would require more than just unplugging the old fridge and plugging in the new fridge.
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Old 02-24-2013, 11:27 AM   #11
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Don't older refrigerators draw a lot more current that today's Energy Star units? Maybe that's the source of the idea that fridges need a 20A circuit. I didn't ask for a dedicated 20A fridge circuit, but that's what the electrician put in. I can hardly believe my nearly 30 cubic foot fridge draws only 3.5 amps, but that's sure what the label says.
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Old 02-24-2013, 11:35 AM   #12
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


This seems to be a common question.....I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm wrong....but here is how I did my kitchen...

2 Separate 20a ckt's (GFI protected) for counter outlets.
1 20a for the Microwave
1 20a for the Fridge....I want it on it's own outlet so that a breaker tripping because of something else does not take it down.
1 20a for the dishwasher.
1 20a for the gas stove top and disposal.

Before I upgraded the electrical in my house, the above would have been impossible....all the houses in our area were wired with 60a service....that was back before microwaves, food processors, blenders and toaster ovens...
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Old 02-24-2013, 12:22 PM   #13
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Quote:
Originally Posted by NJMarine View Post

>> Electric Ranges and OTR Microwave Hoods and Hood Fans do.

Is it ok to run a 20A circuit servicing both the refrigerator and the Hood Fan (rated 1A)?


Quote:
Originally Posted by NJMarine View Post

Install a 20 amp circuit and connect both DW and GD on it. Install breaker lock on CB
What does it help to install a breaker lock?



There is also a gas range. It's rated 15A for electrical, although I wonder if the actual current draw would be minimal as it's mainly for the control panel and perhaps electronic ignition. Can I add the electrical plug of the gas range to this circuit also? Or am I missing the self-cleaning cycle's electrical consumption?


Otherwise, this 20A circuit can service the 15A refrigerator, the 1A range hood, and the electrical of the gas range.

That way, these three stay out of the SABC and

- food won't spoil
- cooking isn't interrupted

if any device on the SABC causes a trip.


Any suggestion for electrical of the gas range?

Last edited by joemc3; 02-24-2013 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 02-24-2013, 06:39 PM   #14
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Quote:
Originally Posted by joemc3 View Post
Is it ok to run a 20A circuit servicing both the refrigerator and the Hood Fan (rated 1A)?

No it useally not the best idea to do that due from my experince many of the homeowner will install the mircohood unit which they will ask for deliciated circuit anyway.

Also watch the height of hood espcally with gaz range.



What does it help to install a breaker lock?

Because if the dishwasher or garbage dispoal unit is hardwired then the breaker lock will be required due you are not in the sight of the breaker unit unless you install a local disconnecting means ( the only loopholes I know of is if you have cord et plug attachement then it is not a issue )



There is also a gas range. It's rated 15A for electrical, although I wonder if the actual current draw would be minimal as it's mainly for the control panel and perhaps electronic ignition. Can I add the electrical plug of the gas range to this circuit also? Or am I missing the self-cleaning cycle's electrical consumption?

The acutal power useage on gaz range is not very much probaly highest load you may hit is about a amp or so but not anything high at all.


Otherwise, this 20A circuit can service the 15A refrigerator, the 1A range hood, and the electrical of the gas range.

You may want to check with your local codes on this one due there are few answer on that.

That way, these three stay out of the SABC and

- food won't spoil
- cooking isn't interrupted

if any device on the SABC causes a trip.


Any suggestion for electrical of the gas range?
I am pretty sure the gaz range power supply can be on the SABC but never the exhaust fan hood that have to be on it own circuit ( see above my comment related to that )

Merci,
Marc
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:25 PM   #15
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Kitchen appliances and NEC requirements


Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchelectrican View Post


many of the homeowner will install the mircohood unit which they will ask for deliciated circuit anyway.

I'm the owner right now and I have the microwave plugged into one of the SABC outlet at the moment, and I have a nice range hood (plug-in for electrical) for the gas range. So it should work out ok for now?


Although, should I still install a separate circuit for the rangehood -- if I sell the property 10 years later it would be of value for the next owner if he/she might want a microhood instead?

I just checked the distance of the range hood from the gas range -- and sure enough it's less than 30" (like 19"). What's the minimum height for gas range? Looks like I'd need to move the range hood up higher (and cut the vent pipes shorter, etc. ...)?


Last edited by joemc3; 02-24-2013 at 07:47 PM.
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