Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-30-2012, 10:29 AM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,503
Share |
Default

Keith


I cannot see why the insurance company can do this as the wiring is compliant then and it is now. There is no law or rule that makes AL wired homes un-insureable. In fact, how do the thousands of other home owners get insurance? You are not the only person to have a house with AL. There are plenty out there and they are insured. Maybe you just need new insurance quote.
I am asking?

J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2012, 10:36 AM   #17
TTW
Member
 
TTW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Maine
Posts: 350
Default

Keith


Sounds like you need to have an electrician do an inspection. Aluminum wiring can be quite safe. Search this forum for 'aluminum', there are several informative threads here.
Home inspectors, as much as some of them might like to think so, are not electricians.
If you have a licensed electrician (or better yet, the local electrical inspector)sign off on the wiring, I don't see how the insurance company can refuse you.
TTW is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to TTW For This Useful Post:
HIVOLT (11-30-2012)
Old 11-30-2012, 11:37 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 2,882
Default

Keith


Quote:
Originally Posted by TTW View Post
If you have a licensed electrician (or better yet, the local electrical inspector) sign off on the wiring, I don't see how the insurance company can refuse you.
Of course they can. They're private businesses and can do whatever they want. It's the same as when I had a muscle car back in the 1970s. Even with no accidents or tickets, I had a hard time getting insurance for it. Why? Single, under 25, in the military, and a high performance car. When I was transferred to MA, I was able to get basic liability because it was a mandatory insurance state (many were not back then). Cost me $700 a year for a $3,000 car. BTW, I'm now 65 and still have not had an accident.

Last edited by md2lgyk; 11-30-2012 at 11:41 AM.
md2lgyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2012, 11:40 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Western PA
Posts: 203
Default

Keith


Quote:
Originally Posted by electures View Post
I don't understand why your insurance copy cares. You are selling the house as is. It should be the buyers problem. I'm confused.
Keith is buying, not selling.

His offer has been accepted by the seller, but like most real estate offers, completing the purchase (the "closing") is contingent upon (amongst other things) his obtaining a mortgage. If he can't get insurance, he can't get a mortgage.

Without insurance and a mortgage, the purchase will fall through (not be consummated). Whether Keith will get his hand money back probably depends on how the contract offer was written.
Dave632 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2012, 02:32 PM   #20
Member
 
Oso954's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Northern Calif.
Posts: 1,505
Default

Keith


Have you specifically asked about aluminum wire with AlumiConn repair ?
Here is a link to companies that accept it, at least in some states.

http://www.alcopstore.com/insurance-...ept-alumiconn/

Hope it helps.
Oso954 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2012, 05:43 PM   #21
Licensed Electrician
 
k_buz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 4,340
Default

Keith


Really?

Quote:
Originally Posted by keith3189 View Post
Iam selling in Ballwin, Mo.
__________________
__________________________________________________ ______________
Answers based on the National Electric Code. Always check local amendments.


k_buz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 07:18 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 2,882
Default

Keith


Quote:
Originally Posted by k_buz View Post
Really?
He is selling his current home and buying another one. The issue is with the one he is buying.
md2lgyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 08:29 AM   #23
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 5
Default

Keith


Hey thanks for all the input. Looks like we found an insurer to insure us as long as we insure our car with them. Personally I am very discouraged with the experience of selling and buying a house. What a CIRCUS it has been. With all the unnecessary fees associated with selling and then to find out the house I am buying has aluminum, ya Problem is the other person I am buying the home with is the main contribitor in this venture. She has talked to a few people about aluminum and they say they have it in their home and have had no problems with it. I worked at an apartment complex a year ago that had nothing but aluminum and I got to tell you that I was drained working their from all day to all night when I was on call and a lot of calls were contributed to electrical problems. I have read that many residents in Florida that have aluminum wiring don't have insurance because the only insurance company that would insure them just dropped everyone with aluminum. That's the thing, what about 2, 4, 10, 20 years from now, will insurance companies even insure this type of hazardous wiring? THATS THE QUESTION. Thanks for letting me bend your ear. Keith
keith3189 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 08:40 AM   #24
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 5
Default

Keith


I just wanted to say that I think aluminum can be safe if properly maintained. When it comes to buying a home ANYONE would want copper over aluminum, it's just proven to be safer. Right?
keith3189 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 08:59 AM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 2,882
Default

Keith


Quote:
Originally Posted by keith3189 View Post
I just wanted to say that I think aluminum can be safe if properly maintained. When it comes to buying a home ANYONE would want copper over aluminum, it's just proven to be safer. Right?
Hey, aluminum is better than knob and tube. But I'm pretty sure aluminum is now prohibited in new construction homes. Gotta be a reason for that.
md2lgyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 09:04 AM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Western PA
Posts: 203
Default

Keith


Not to scare you, Keith, but I was Googling around about aluminum wiring and (at least on one website) it said that houses with Al wiring were 55 times more likely to have a house fire. Which is why the insurance companies want to stay away from them.

You might want to plan on having your connections checked/repaired, and maybe long term, look into having the wiring redone with all copper.
Dave632 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 09:18 AM   #27
Licensed Electrician
 
k_buz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 4,340
Default

Keith


Quote:
Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
Hey, aluminum is better than knob and tube. But I'm pretty sure aluminum is now prohibited in new construction homes. Gotta be a reason for that.

I'm not sure I agree with either of the assessments in this statement. The problem with the AL wiring isn't the wiring itself. The problem arises when the connections/splices go bad. In today's DIY/Big Box Store world/trying to save $$ world, this is becoming more and more of a problem when homeowner's replace devices not knowing that they have to use special AL rated devices or wire nuts.

Knob and tube is definately not the preferred wiring method today, but its a pretty solid wiring method. It has been working in homes for 90ish years or so. It doesn't have a ground, can't be in direct contact with insulation, and there are buried splices all over the place, but it has stood the test of time.

AL is very commonly used in new home construction today. Service entrance conductors, range feeds, dryer feeds, and sub panel feeds are commonly wired with AL conductors. However, I think AL starts at 8 (maybe 10 AWG). So, 15 and 20A branch circuit conductors are not wired with AL.

__________________
__________________________________________________ ______________
Answers based on the National Electric Code. Always check local amendments.


k_buz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gulf Island Building. cocobolo Project Showcase 8203 Yesterday 01:15 AM
Swiftlock VINYL plank flooring keithl1967 Flooring 21 06-11-2013 06:34 PM
Installing new stair treads Hank98 Carpentry 12 01-06-2012 06:47 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.