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Old 10-18-2009, 09:39 PM   #46
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So you are saying a 4-way switch needs AFCI protection .
I don't mind being proved wrong .

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Old 10-18-2009, 09:48 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubbie View Post
This is the present language of what the code is going to say in 2008.


2008 NECó210.12
Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.
(B) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in a dwelling unit in family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, sun rooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination type installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.
FPN: For information on types of arc-fault circuit interrupters, see UL 1699-1999, Standard for Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters.
Exception No. 1: Where RMC. IMC, EMT or steel armored cable, Type AC, meeting the requirements of 250.118 using metal outlet and junction boxes is installed for the portion of the branch circuit between the branch circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet, it shall be permitted to install a combination AFCI at the first outlet to provide protection for the remaining portion of the branch circuit
The lights are outside and the switch wouldn't be considered an " outlet "
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Old 10-19-2009, 05:43 AM   #48
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Electro,

First, as I stated earlier, this thread is almost two years old. The information in it is quite dated considering the code cycles we follow.

Second, under the 2008 NEC all OUTLETS in the areas shown must be protected, not just receptacles.
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Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
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Old 10-19-2009, 11:14 AM   #49
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My question would be: Why are you posting "for fun" questions? Or any poll type of question? Who are you? And why all of a sudden?

Speedy, I should have waited to post, as you can see.
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Old 10-19-2009, 04:50 PM   #50
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The title caught my eye and then I was more interested because we have an outside light switch in our bedroom, and have for many years. After reading all the posts, I still don't know the right answer M
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Old 10-19-2009, 04:52 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie337 View Post
The title caught my eye and then I was more interested because we have an outside light switch in our bedroom, and have for many years. After reading all the posts, I still don't know the right answer M
2008 NECó210.12
Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.

(B) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in a dwelling unit in family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, sun rooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination type installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.

Bedrooms are included for AFCI requirements
Where is the actual light located, on the outside wall of the bedroom ?

You are not required to upgrade to meet new codes
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Old 10-19-2009, 06:48 PM   #52
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Thanks Dave. The light is on the outside wall. A floodlight. There are switches in the bedroom and by the back door. But, is a switch an outlet? Sounds to me like it means the plugs in those rooms? But then what do i know. Why is it not more clear? M
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Old 10-19-2009, 07:06 PM   #53
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Definition from the NEC:
Quote:
Outlet: A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment
since a switch is taking current at that point to supply equipment then it can be considered an outlet under the NEC
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:17 PM   #54
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Outlet: A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment

I see it as a control location , not as a point where" current is taken "
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Old 10-19-2009, 08:33 PM   #55
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and I'm sure different Inspector's would have different opinions
their opinion is the only one that matters
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:50 AM   #56
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A switch is not an outlet. In Melanie's situation neither the switch or the light require AFCI protection.
Quote:
The light is on the outside wall. A floodlight. There are switches in the bedroom and by the back door.
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Old 10-20-2009, 09:33 AM   #57
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But what if the switch is one of these? Is the pilot light considered utilization equipment even though its integrated into the switch?


Utilization Equipment.
Equipment that utilizes electric
energy for electronic, electromechanical, chemical, heating,
lighting, or similar purposes.


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