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-   -   intranet and cable question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/intranet-cable-question-202991/)

lendosky 07-01-2014 06:17 PM

intranet and cable question
 
Hey now. My house is from the 1980's. All the rg wiring is 'old' according to the cable company geek that came out and hooked up the modem. Only the stuff coming in from the curb is new/rg6 (I believe that Anyhow, I hate cables that are run all over the house and on this particular house there are plenty of wires hanging all around on the exterior.

We don't watch cable tv, we only use the ethernets on the world wide web to watch jpegs and the htmls. Okay, I'm sorry I was having fun sounding like I was 90.

My real problem is I have a modem where the rg6 comes in from the curb. That modem does not give enough signal across the house and upstairs to my office (convenient, huh?) for my wife to successfully telecommute. Currently our computer and 2 monitors are on our dining room table. Classy, right? I was hoping I could buy some outdoor rated cat and run that above ground under the bottom of the siding so it's out of sight. Most of the stuff I see online is 'direct burial' so I'm curious if I MUST bury it or will it be okay. I don't want to run cables inside the home because I screwed up and fixed all the drywall and painted long before I even thought about cat. I know that there are signal repeaters etc. but I don't want something that could fail and then have my wife complain.

Lastly, which cable should I use? Cat5, Cat6, 6e or 6a? I have no idea what those things mean and which is the newest standard. Or should I just split the existing rg6 and run that around to the other side of the house and use a non wireless modem up there? Thanks.

gregzoll 07-01-2014 09:16 PM

Not enough wireless coverage. Just get the extenders that plug into electrical outlets.

ddawg16 07-01-2014 09:53 PM

Or get wireless repeaters.....

They connect to your existing wireless....and re transmit...

If you decide to use any Cat cable...just use Cat6. 5E is ok...but wont' carry as much current if you were doing POE

gregzoll 07-02-2014 08:43 AM

ddawg16, I use only Cat-5e in my house. No problems with the POE injector for my A/P I use. It is a misnomer that Cat-5e cannot do POE or even over 1gb/s.

ddawg16 07-02-2014 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll
ddawg16, I use only Cat-5e in my house. No problems with the POE injector for my A/P I use. It is a misnomer that Cat-5e cannot do POE or even over 1gb/s.

For the average home where the distances are relatively short, you are correct.

Given the small cost difference, might as well use Cat6....unless you already have the cat 5e

sgip2000 07-02-2014 05:46 PM

First off, buy your own modem and router and stop leasing one from the cable company. Renting is a big rip off.

Any of the latest generation of "AC" routers should provide enough coverage for the average size home.

lendosky 07-02-2014 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1370922)
If you decide to use any Cat cable...just use Cat6.

Cool, thanks for the helpful response. I already have an ac modem, I have heard horror stories about the extenders and repeaters. The ONLY solution is hard wired for my needs.

Is there anything I should look for when purchasing my cat6 considering the run will be about 140'? Is there really a difference between cat6e, cat6a etc?

Bob Sanders 07-02-2014 11:16 PM

cat6a gives you an operating frequency of 250Mhz, while the 6e claims to double that. The 6e though is not officially recognized by the Telecommunications Industry Association

In all honesty I would use the 6 if you're going to run it outside simply and specifically because the casing is thicker (longer weather protection) but you won't notice a difference in operation between the 5e and the 6

gregzoll 07-05-2014 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lendosky (Post 1371280)
Cool, thanks for the helpful response. I already have an ac modem, I have heard horror stories about the extenders and repeaters. The ONLY solution is hard wired for my needs.

Is there anything I should look for when purchasing my cat6 considering the run will be about 140'? Is there really a difference between cat6e, cat6a etc?

You will never have a need for Cat-6 in a home environment. Cat-5e will be around after you go to the grave. Cat-5e can easily handle 10gb/s with still room to breathe.

As for Wireless-ac. It is great if you are streaming videos from a server to a laptop. But useless if you only have a 25mb/s Internet connection and just want it, because it is cool.

I use two Wireless A/P's in my house. An Engenius ECB350 Wireless-N 300mb/s high output A/P in my front room. I use a Trendnet TEW-638apb for Wireless-b/g devices.

The ECB-350 can cover a lot of square footage and if need be. Up in my attic if I feel the need to use my cellphone while up there doing something.

The biggest problem when someone tackles a job like this. Especially if it is the first time. Is they realize in six months that they screwed something up. It took me six times, in 11 years, before I have found the proper combo of equipment that I need. It was not until this year, when Wireless-N equipment took a good price drive. That it became cost affordable. Same for the router I use, along with the NAS & UPS.

I have been doing this stuff for over 35 years. Each time, you learn something new from every time you tackle a job. It is a never ending process.

lendosky 07-07-2014 11:20 AM

A/P? NAS? UPS? What are those things gregzoll? I'm an idiot when it comes to networking. I just know to unplug the router and modem when they don't work lol.

ddawg16 07-07-2014 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lendosky
A/P? NAS? UPS? What are those things gregzoll? I'm an idiot when it comes to networking. I just know to unplug the router and modem when they don't work lol.

A/P=access point

NAS-it's a shared network drive. A lot of the new routers have an NAS pot that let's you plug in a USB external drive and it now become available to anyone on the network.

UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply

MT Stringer 07-07-2014 01:51 PM

Quote:

My real problem is I have a modem where the rg6 comes in from the curb. That modem does not give enough signal across the house and upstairs to my office (convenient, huh?) for my wife to successfully telecommute.
Man, you really got me confused. You don't need no stinking cat something run all over the house.

Immediately downstream of your cable modem, you should install a wireless router. That will give all of your devices access to the outside world. There is no need to run cable. If the signal is weak upstairs or wherever, add a wireless repeater.

These days, wireless printers can be connected so you can print to them from your network devices...again, no cable required. My Canon printer/scanner is just sitting on the desk. It was in the dining room when we first fired it up. :-)

Good luck.
Mike

Seattle2k 07-09-2014 02:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1372480)
You will never have a need for Cat-6 in a home environment. Cat-5e will be around after you go to the grave. Cat-5e can easily handle 10gb/s with still room to breathe.

I have been doing this stuff for over 35 years.


Ahem...I've been doing this stuff for 10 years...

Cat5 = up to 100mbps
Cat5e = up to 1000mbps (1Gbps), also less crosstalk than Cat5
Cat6 = up to 10Gbps, offers more interference protection.

curiousB 07-09-2014 09:14 AM

I have a similar problem but didn't want to use wireless repeaters. So I bought and $30 router at Walmart. The modem is downstairs at the service drop so it gets maximum Cable RF signal. Then I run CAT5 wiring from basement up to top of a cabinet in my main floor kitchen that is dead center of my home. There is the cheapo walmart router being used as an access point.

A couple things:

- The CAT5 connects from a LAN port of the basement modem to a LAN (you don't use WAN jack) on the cheapo router.
- Set up the upstairs router on a different RF channel than the basement one. Use a non overlapping channel 1,6, and 11 are completely non overlapping.
- disable NAT and DHCP on the upstairs router. Your main router will provide these services
- set up the WiFi SSID and password the same as in the main router. This will allow clients to roam within your home and automatically lock onto the access point best for that location.

Bob Sanders 07-09-2014 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MT Stringer (Post 1373051)
Immediately downstream of your cable modem, you should install a wireless router. That will give all of your devices access to the outside world. There is no need to run cable. If the signal is weak upstairs or wherever, add a wireless repeater.

It depends on what you're doing.
If you're streaming full sized blu ray rips from nas to tv for example or even transferring 20 or 40 gig files then wireless can be more of a pain than anything else. There is also a security risk with wireless as opposed to hard wire.
A good system will operate on both principles. Wireless for the smaller hand held devices and hard wire for the work horse situations.

I wouldn't even consider going strictly wireless.


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