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-   -   insulation around recessed lighting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/insulation-around-recessed-lighting-2413/)

wiggs 05-04-2006 02:22 PM

insulation around recessed lighting
 
I recently built a garage with living space above.I just got my electrical rough in inspected and ok'd.I am now at the insulation phase.I have ten i.c. high hats upstairs.I believe you can insulate all around these high hats because they are thermally protected.The potential for fire still worries me.Other electricians have told me to keep the insulation 3" away from these high hats.Should I insulate tightly around these i.c. high hats or stay away?I also have a 1500 watt wall heater in the bathroom.Should this be insulated around tightly?The insulation is kraft faced,the paper being the real fire hazzard I believe.What does i.c. stand for?

IvoryRing 05-04-2006 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wiggs
I recently built a garage with living space above.I just got my electrical rough in inspected and ok'd.I am now at the insulation phase.I have ten i.c. high hats upstairs.I believe you can insulate all around these high hats because they are thermally protected.The potential for fire still worries me.Other electricians have told me to keep the insulation 3" away from these high hats.Should I insulate tightly around these i.c. high hats or stay away?I also have a 1500 watt wall heater in the bathroom.Should this be insulated around tightly?The insulation is kraft faced,the paper being the real fire hazzard I believe.What does i.c. stand for?

I can't answer this completely or from direct experience, but from my research on recessed lights... IC means insulation contact. Having said that, what's the drawback to having a (3" or 3' or 3 mile) standoff if it will make you feel better? I am 100% sure that IC doesn't mean 'must be in contact with insulation' it means 'may be'.

eleservtech 05-04-2006 04:01 PM

ic does mean in contact. Which means contact with insulation is ok and safe. The ic rated cans are thermally protected to prevent overheating and fires

JimmyjamGE 03-17-2011 09:56 AM

IC Ratings
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IvoryRing (Post 10902)
I can't answer this completely or from direct experience, but from my research on recessed lights... IC means insulation contact. Having said that, what's the drawback to having a (3" or 3' or 3 mile) standoff if it will make you feel better? I am 100% sure that IC doesn't mean 'must be in contact with insulation' it means 'may be'.

You want the 3" space around the lights. This is accomplished by using either the special fire retardant buckets and boxes you can order online, or in my own home I used just regular card board boxes that gave almost 6" all around. It didn't matter to me because I was doing a flash and batt Insulation Setup. That's a flash coat of foam with batt insulation over it. If you're going to use fiberglass then my Professional Opinion (I'm a BPI Certified Shell Specialist) is to flash and batt. Otherwise fiberglass is really just an expensive air filter. I'm slightly biased being that I just started my own foam business. If you're trying to save money you flash and batt or flash and fill (same concept but with cellulose). If you have any questions, just ask.

michaelcherr 03-17-2011 10:23 AM

IC means insullation contact.
I disagree with the previous post.
This allows you to not need the 3" of space normally required.
Put your insullation right up to the light. Your energy billl will thank you.
Your lights are designed for this.

Jackofall1 03-17-2011 10:31 AM

JimmyJamGE no not what he talk about when it comes to IC rated fixtures, but he does have a good point when it comes to insulation.

FG bat is not a real good performer, there are other options that have much better insulating qualities.

Mark

FixitDragon 03-17-2011 10:41 AM

I.C. means insulation contact. It means you may insulate right up to the cans. The entire reason for getting i.c. cans is so you don't need to leave the gap. That area where you leave a gap, will just have drywall, and the R-value of 1/2" drywall is 0.45 Multiply the area times 10 cans, and you end up with a significant area that has no insulating value. If you are going to leave the gap anyway, then why go the expense for i.c. cans?

I have 12 i.c. cans in my ceiling. When I first installed them, I used the regular 65W incandecent bulbs (I now use 15W CFLs). These lights are left on 10-12hrs a day (almost no natural light in this part of the house). Even in the summer with outside temps 110-115, and attic temp higher than that, and the lights on for all day, I have never had any of them thermal trip.

clydesdale 03-17-2011 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wiggs
I recently built a garage with living space above.I just got my electrical rough in inspected and ok'd.I am now at the insulation phase.I have ten i.c. high hats upstairs.I believe you can insulate all around these high hats because they are thermally protected.The potential for fire still worries me.Other electricians have told me to keep the insulation 3" away from these high hats.Should I insulate tightly around these i.c. high hats or stay away?I also have a 1500 watt wall heater in the bathroom.Should this be insulated around tightly?The insulation is kraft faced,the paper being the real fire hazzard I believe.What does i.c. stand for?

To minimize any risk I would simply remove the craft paper around the cans. Another alternative is to use stone wool insulation like Roxul ComfortBatt. This stuff is expensive compared to fiberglass but you could just use it around the cans.

jbfan 03-17-2011 01:28 PM

This thread is 5 years old.
I hope he has completed the task by now!:whistling2:


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