DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Electrical (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/)
-   -   installing nema locking plug outlet. need advice. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/installing-nema-locking-plug-outlet-need-advice-30101/)

SPIT 10-17-2008 03:08 PM

installing nema locking plug outlet. need advice.
 
i have to pull wire and install a receptical for a vaccum heat press in my shop.
these are the requirements: 4-wire, single phase NEMA L14-20 plug 230 VAC, 15 Amps -
and here's a link to the actual equipment: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...specifications

i was an assistant electrician for a year, but i'm a novice. what supplies do i need? i figure i need a double 230 breaker..don't know what wire...and a L14-20 outlet.

can anyone help me get started?
andy

ScottR 10-17-2008 03:21 PM

You would need 12-3 wire/cable, a double pole 20A breaker, and as you said, an L14-20 receptacle, and a box for it. Plus any cable clamps, etc needed for your type of cable/conduit.

If this is going in a residential shop, you can probably use NM cable -- commercial you'd probably need to run MC cable or conduit.

I'm an amateur, BTW -- there are plenty of really knowledgeable pro electricians on this site, so you might want to wait to hear from one of them too before you go shopping. :wink:

Pudge565 10-17-2008 03:21 PM

If it is straight 220, 230, 240 whichever you want to call it you only need 2 wire with ground. Since it is only 15 amps you only need 14 gauge wire but I would go with 12 wire on a 20 amp breaker just to be safe.

ScottR 10-17-2008 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bhpphotovideo.com
Requirements: 4-wire, single phase NEMA L14-20 plug 230 VAC, 15 Amps

According to the requirements on the site, it's 4-wire. So 2 hots, neutral, and a ground. The electronics may require 120V. (Hence 12-3 cable).

jerryh3 10-17-2008 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pudge565 (Post 173346)
If it is straight 220, 230, 240 whichever you want to call it you only need 2 wire with ground. Since it is only 15 amps you only need 14 gauge wire but I would go with 12 wire on a 20 amp breaker just to be safe.

Read the details. It call for a four wire plug, so you know it's a four wire run. How about 12 gauge on a 15A breaker?

ScottR 10-17-2008 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3
How about 12 gauge on a 15A breaker?

Not sure if this will be running for >3 hours.. If it's a continuous load it would have to be on an OCPD rated for 125% of load, therefore 20A breaker... no?

jerryh3 10-17-2008 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScottR (Post 173373)
Not sure if this will be running for >3 hours.. If it's a continuous load it would have to be on an OCPD rated for 125% of load, therefore 20A breaker... no?

If you put it that way, then yes. The requirements are written funny. It says it's a 15A load, but requires a 15A circuit. If this thing is meant to run continuously, then it should be spec'ed to a 20A circuit.

SPIT 10-17-2008 05:53 PM

it will run continuously for most applications for just a few minutes. i don't think any more than 10minutes. i want to use the vaccum press eventually for rubber vaccuum clamp sheeting for wood veneering which could require leaving it on overnight.

SD515 10-17-2008 06:24 PM

NEMA L14-20=20 amp receptacle. The specs call for a 15A circuit, but the receptacle is rated 20A. I'd run 12 AWG on a 2P-20A brkr. Also note that the specs say " ** International (export) model electrical specifications"...so are these specs for the U.S. or outside the U.S.??

SPIT 10-17-2008 06:31 PM

so is the 4 wire pretty common...can i find it in a role of the flex conduit?

SD515 10-17-2008 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SPIT (Post 173404)
so is the 4 wire pretty common...can i find it in a role of the flex conduit?

If you mean 12/3 w/gnd MC cable, yes, it's common. Commonaly a 25 foot roll is the smallest you'll find on a shelf in a big-box store, but not always. Some may sell it by the foot also.

ScottR 10-17-2008 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SD515
Also note that the specs say " ** International (export) model electrical specifications"...so are these specs for the U.S. or outside the U.S.??

I think that ** refers to where it says 3-wire.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Website
230 VAC, 15 Amps; Requirements: 4-wire, single phase NEMA L14-20 plug 230 VAC, 15 Amps - **3-wire

** International (export) model electrical specifications


rgsgww 10-18-2008 02:11 AM

When you run romex down a wall exposed, it must be protected by conduit. Be sure to use proper bushings if you do. (This is a short run down a wall, no romex in conduit in other situations)

Tuckahoe Sparkplug 10-18-2008 05:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScottR (Post 173345)
You would need 12-3 wire/cable, a double pole 20A breaker, and as you said, an L14-20 receptacle, and a box for it. Plus any cable clamps, etc needed for your type of cable/conduit.

If this is going in a residential shop, you can probably use NM cable -- commercial you'd probably need to run MC cable or conduit.

I'm an amateur, BTW -- there are plenty of really knowledgeable pro electricians on this site, so you might want to wait to hear from one of them too before you go shopping. :wink:

Scott is right on the money here (although it should be a 12/3 with ground cable) :thumbsup:. A continuous load is considered to be 3+ hours and should not load the circuit to more than 80% of it's ampacity: on a 20 amp circuit that would be 16 amps. This is to prevent the build-up of heat in the circuit during the extended duration. If you're unsure of whether it will be a continuous load or not, I would err on the side of safety and wire it as a continuous load.

SD515 10-18-2008 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScottR (Post 173449)
I think that ** refers to where it says 3-wire.

I think you're right Scott...my bad.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:17 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved