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Old 05-10-2013, 04:34 PM   #16
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Installing a ceramic kiln


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Originally Posted by jahertz View Post
[ATTACH]70628[/ATTACH


Now I what I am having trouble with is finding an outlet/receptacle that 1) matches the factory plug. 2) matches the 240v 60A


Get rid of the plug is good advice, especially if the cord and plug are minimally rated near their capacity, "Evenheat" is old, the plastic plug is going to be old, probably brittle too. Am I right to observe this kiln probably was purchased used from someone?
It appears your specific model was discontinued back in 1999, it's already at least 14 years old, possibly closer to 20


Mine is a factory new cone 10 Olympic, since it is new and it will never be full at full max capacity/temperature, it has the original plug.

What was really odd is their install/owner's manual had an error in it- the same one was reproduced on their web site for the specs.
It said this, see if anyone can spot the error, this one is easy:

Volts 240/208 1Ph
Amps 26.25/30
Watts 6,300
Breaker 1Ph 40
Plug config NEMA 6-50
Copper Wire Size #10, #8 if circuit more than 40 ft.





If you caught the wire size being #10 as wrong, you get the gold star!
I saw that in the manual and went "no way, that's got to be a misprint!"
The #10 wire max capacity being 30 amps.

I went to Olympic's web site again and viewed their manual and compared it to a previous one I downloaded 2 years ago when I was shopping, the 2 year old file was correct, the new one was not- the wiring specs was changed from #8 to #10.
I used #8 not #10.


Last edited by RWolff; 05-10-2013 at 04:42 PM.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:43 PM   #17
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Installing a ceramic kiln


I don't care what the manual says or if the kiln comes with that plug, it will melt. I know this from experience and fact that it's happened to me several times in the early days when all of my kilns had those worthless power cords. I've seen these things melt completely away and ruin entire outlet. Heck, I'm pretty sure I see in OP's photo of plug that it is already melted some and plastic pulling away from prong.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:48 PM   #18
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Installing a ceramic kiln


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Kiln's do not typically come with a cord attached, especially medium to bigger ones like this.
The larger ones have no plugs, but his 45 amp model, a medium size does, this is his model 2329 cone 8 max kiln, but updated with new controls, it uses NEMA 6-50:


RM II 2329
23.5" Dia. x 29" Deep - 7.5 cubic feet
(59.7cm Dia. x 73.7cm Deep - 212.4L)

Operating Voltage: 240V
Amperage: 45A
Watts: 10,800W

Operating Voltage: 208V
Amperage: 48A
Watts: 9984W

Power Cord Plug Style: NEMA 6-50P
Ship Weight: 240lb (109kg)

Their HF2927 is direct wired and is 14,164 watts, 59A

The next smaller model that says it uses NEMA 6-50 is 11,520 watts.

So it looks like this 10,800 watt 45A unit barely makes the NEMA 6-50 before they have "direct wire" listed in the kiln manual.

I guess I don't like the idea of running 48 amps on a plug/outlet rated for 50, I would hard wire this.

Here's the owner's manual for this kiln:

http://evenheat-kiln.com/ceramic/rmseries/rm2-2329/

Last edited by RWolff; 05-10-2013 at 05:05 PM.
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Old 05-10-2013, 05:09 PM   #19
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Installing a ceramic kiln


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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
I guess so huh?

It amazes me how a presumably listed product can be so blatantly non-code-complaint.
Or how the owner's manual and installation instructions on another brand specifies #10 wire and a 40 amp breaker for up to 40 foot circuit;

Volts 240/208 1Ph
Amps 26.25/30
Watts 6,300
Breaker 1Ph 40
Plug config NEMA 6-50
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Old 05-11-2013, 02:01 PM   #20
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Installing a ceramic kiln


Speedy
37x 124 is 46.25 Explain the 37 number
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Old 05-11-2013, 06:13 PM   #21
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Installing a ceramic kiln


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Speedy
37x 124 is 46.25 Explain the 37 number
Look at the post I quoted in my reply.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:24 PM   #22
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Installing a ceramic kiln


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37 x 125% = 46.25
cord and plug connected
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:36 PM   #23
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Installing a ceramic kiln


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Kiln's do not typically come with a cord attached, especially medium to bigger ones like this.
I admittedly don't know much about kilns (my wife is the potter, not me), but she bought hers new about 5 years ago, and it did come with an attached cord. So far, it shows no signs of any melting. But then, the kiln's only on a 30-amp breaker. I wouldn't think it would melt any more than a dryer or oven plug would.

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Old 05-12-2013, 12:30 AM   #24
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Installing a ceramic kiln


I have one of my customer did have pretty large kiln but one instering twist is that he have triphase kiln and it did oringally came with 60 amp triphase plug but I told him get rid of that and go with hard wired and never have any issue with it.

As for common single phase kiln size like what ya got there I know there were couple I ran into most case I tell them go with hardwird and be done with it.

It the same way over here in France most case just hardwired and be done with it.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 05-12-2013, 12:31 AM   #25
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Installing a ceramic kiln


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Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
I admittedly don't know much about kilns (my wife is the potter, not me), but she bought hers new about 5 years ago, and it did come with an attached cord. So far, it shows no signs of any melting. But then, the kiln's only on a 30-amp breaker. I wouldn't think it would melt any more than a dryer or oven plug would.
I think the reason they tend to melt is because a kiln draws more power for a longer time, and also in a hot environment. A dryer or oven doesn't run at full power (right near the receptacle rating) continuously for 12 hours. My kiln's exterior temperature reached 325F, and it radiates a lot of heat to the surrounding surfaces. A plug nearby would get very hot.
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Old 05-12-2013, 12:35 AM   #26
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Installing a ceramic kiln


mpoulton.,

They do get pretty hot and the amount of load is constant until it hit the peak firing tempture ( useally a cone ) will trip the lever and shut the power off and let it cool down overnite.

That one reason why as soon I heard kiln circuit I useally upsize the conductors for that purpose and keep that breaker away from other breakers to keep it cool so it will not trip out early.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 05-12-2013, 01:51 AM   #27
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Installing a ceramic kiln


Quote:
Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
I admittedly don't know much about kilns (my wife is the potter, not me), but she bought hers new about 5 years ago, and it did come with an attached cord. So far, it shows no signs of any melting. But then, the kiln's only on a 30-amp breaker. I wouldn't think it would melt any more than a dryer or oven plug would.
Keep in mind a kiln is going to be running for many hours, a dryer or oven might run an hour or so, while the kiln cycle could be 8 or 10 or more hours depending on what's being done, a longer period in which things can heat up, and of course there's radiant heat from the kiln too and if it's close to the outlet it radiates on that somewhat.

Quote:
I think the reason they tend to melt is because a kiln draws more power for a longer time, and also in a hot environment. A dryer or oven doesn't run at full power (right near the receptacle rating) continuously for 12 hours. My kiln's exterior temperature reached 325F, and it radiates a lot of heat to the surrounding surfaces. A plug nearby would get very hot.
I've run mine to 2000 degrees over about that time frame, I never measured the temperature on its exterior but I could briefly touch the lid, it could have been around 325 I suppose, maybe less since the ambient room temperature at the time was 50, my kiln is far enough away from the outlet that I didn't feel anything getting hot there, but my kiln is a cone 10 model with 3" brick.


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