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-   -   Installing a 230v outlet (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/installing-230v-outlet-3074/)

ThePlumber 07-14-2006 01:42 PM

Installing a 230v outlet
 
Ive just bought a Lincoln Mig-Pak 15 welder and have no place to plug it in just yet (230v 3 prong plug). Since I have a new 200amp panel in my house that is hardly being used to its full potential I was hoping to run a separate line to a new external 230v outlet with maybe a couple 110 outlets for an extension cord or two. I was just wondering what would be the proper way to do this and if anyone might forsee some problems I might run into right down to tying it in to the panel.

eg. How should the oultet be weather proofed,
What type of wire should I use,
etc.

Thanks

Mike Swearingen 07-14-2006 03:37 PM

A. I'm not a pro electrician, but here's what I would consider.
B. If these are to be external outlets, they must be ground-fault protected.
C. A 230v external outlet will require a GFCI double-pole breaker of the amp indicated for the welder usage and the wire should be at least 10/2+ground, depending upon the distance. 230v has no neutral, so both insulated wires would be hot to the breaker and the bare ground wire would go to the panel ground buss.
D. An external 110v receptacle should be on a 20 amp single-pole breaker with 12/2+g wiring, if it were me. The receptacle (or at least the first one in the circuit) should be a GFCI, which also would make any receptacle beyond it in the same circuit GFCI-protected. The white neutral goes to the neutral buss in the panel, the ground goes to the ground buss, and the black hot goes to the breaker.
This is where I would start, but wait until a pro electrican comes along to confirm it (or not).
Also, check with your Building Inspection Department for local code, permit and inspection requirements before you do anything.
Good LucK!
Mike

Sparky Joe 07-14-2006 07:49 PM

Mike is correct, but just want to clear up a couple things. Beofre you go out and 10/2 wire, check the amperage of your welder, that will determine the size wire to use.

Also for the receptacles, the GFI's need to be wired a specific way to make the other receptacles downstream from them GFI protected, just read the paper that comes with the GFI to know how to do this.

Speedy Petey 07-14-2006 08:57 PM

GFI protection is NOT required for 240v installations if this nature, regardless of location.

Mike Swearingen 07-14-2006 11:54 PM

Thank you Speedy.
However, it is for the 230v for my boathouse boatlift motor here, so I assumed that it was also required for any outdoor location, like 110v. Must not be for this situation.
Thanks. Mike

Speedy Petey 07-15-2006 08:06 AM

Even your 240v boat lift motor did not require GFI protection.

Most folk are under the impression that anything and everything electrical near water requires GFI protection. Many still still think the 6' rule applies, and applies to everything.

The only thing in a residence that requires GFI protection is 125v, 15 & 20 amp receptacles, in the locations described in NEC 210.8. Also cord connected pool motors and spas.
That's it. According to the NEC if it is 240v, and not related to a pool or spa, it requires NO GFI protection.

This of course does not mean you can't GFI these things, it's just not required.

ThePlumber 07-15-2006 10:56 AM

Thanks for clearing up the gfi problems for me, it should save me a little cash. Also i got this advice on another forum supposedly from a electrician/welder and was wondering if you guys would agree (it sounds pretty solid).

"Your welder needs a 30A breaker, so you have the option of running only #10 wire to your NEMA 6-50R receptacle, or if you want the full ability of the receptacle in case you get a bigger welder later, run #8 and a 50A breaker."

does it sound pretty good?
thanks!




ThePlumber 07-15-2006 11:16 AM

also if I were to decide to use an extension cord to use the welder farther down the driveway is there a possibility the added distance would trip the breaker a lot? just wondering


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