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Old 09-09-2016, 03:23 PM   #1
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Inspector feedback


1. In my reno, I put smoke detectors on a dedicated circuit. The inspector says it must be connected to a light circuit so that if the breaker is thrown, you will have some kind of visual indicator. What are my alternatives here in Canada? What if I put something like a hard-wired step light by the main door on the same circuit as the smoke detectors - will this satisfy code?

2. I put kitchen outlet less than 3.5 feet away from the sink. Inspector did not like this. In bathrooms, you see outlets for toothbrushes/hair dryers less than 3.5 feet from the sink. What does the code say regarding this?

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Old 09-09-2016, 03:32 PM   #2
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Re: Inspector feedback


The short answer is you need to talk to the inspector about any questions you have, as he's the person you have to satisfy.

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Old 09-09-2016, 03:37 PM   #3
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Re: Inspector feedback


1. Smoke detector can NOT be on an AFCI protected circuit.
2.If there is lighting on the circuit it should be fine.

Here is the section from the 2012 CEC which provincial codes is based on.

Quote:
32-110 Installation of smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in dwelling units
(see Appendices B and G)
The following requirements apply to the installation of permanently connected smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide alarms in dwelling units:
(a) smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms shall be supplied from a lighting circuit, or from a circuit that
supplies a mix of lighting and receptacles, and in any case shall not be installed
(i) where prohibited by Rules 26-720 to 26-724; and
(ii) where the circuit is protected by a GFCI or AFCI;
(b) there shall be no disconnecting means between the smoke alarm or the carbon monoxide alarm and the
overcurrent device for the branch circuit;
(c) the wiring method for smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms, including any interconnection of units
and their associated equipment, shall be in accordance with Rules 32-100 and 32-102; and
(d) notwithstanding Item (c), where a smoke alarm or carbon monoxide alarm circuit utilizes a Class 2 power
supply for the interconnection of the smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms and their associated
equipment, Class 2 wiring methods shall be permitted in buildings of combustible construction, provided
that the conductors are installed in accordance with Rules 12-506 to 12-524 inclusive.
Also no more than 12 outlets per circuit. Not sure if each smoke counts as an outlet or they count as one as a whole.

There no rule I know of regarding receptacles closer that 3.5 feet of sink. In kitchen you must have no section of counter more than 2 feet from a receptacle. So if that was the closest one to the sink you need to add one because if you place something right beside the sink it is more than two feet away. Receptacles can be 4 apart because if you place something in the center of the two it will be 2 feet either way to one of them.
It needs to be GFCI protected if within 1.5 meters of sink.

Last edited by joed; 09-09-2016 at 03:44 PM.
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Old 09-09-2016, 03:49 PM   #4
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Re: Inspector feedback


Thanks @joed . Hard to read the code. From your understanding, can smoke detectors be on a dedicated circuit?
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Old 09-09-2016, 04:55 PM   #5
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
From your understanding, can smoke detectors be on a dedicated circuit?
No they can not.

Quote:
smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms shall be supplied from a lighting circuit, or from a circuit that supplies a mix of lighting and receptacles
I think the point is they don't want you to be able to go into the panel and turn them off. By putting them on a circuit with lighting you would have other problems by turning off lights as well.

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Old 09-09-2016, 05:38 PM   #6
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Re: Inspector feedback


I see. How can I fix the problem? Got drywall everywhere now.

Possible option 1: Might be able to add a dedicated night light somewhere - wiring it up from the crawlspace. Will this qualify as a fix?

Possible option 2: Can I put two wires (one from general light circuit and one from smoke detectors) on the same breaker at the panel?
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Old 09-09-2016, 05:41 PM   #7
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
Possible option 1: Might be able to add a dedicated night light somewhere - wiring it up from the crawlspace. Will this qualify as a fix?
Don't know if the inspector would accept that or not.

Quote:
Possible option 2: Can I put two wires (one from general light circuit and one from smoke detectors) on the same breaker at the panel?
Some breakers can accept two wires, some can not. Your inspector might accept the two wires pigtailed to a single wire going to the breaker.
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Old 09-09-2016, 05:56 PM   #8
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
Originally Posted by joed View Post
Some breakers can accept two wires
What are these breakers called? Do you know if SquareD makes these?
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Old 09-09-2016, 06:03 PM   #9
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
Originally Posted by AidaCarrell3 View Post
What are these breakers called? Do you know if SquareD makes these?
IIRC, Square D QO accepts 2wires, homeline only one.

Not sure if you inspector would accept the 2 wires on one breaker or some sort of pigtail arrangement in the panel. To easy to disconnect one from the other ?

Last edited by Oso954; 09-09-2016 at 06:08 PM.
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Old 09-10-2016, 09:04 AM   #10
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Re: Inspector feedback


Why not just join the two hot wires and a pigtail under a wirenut inside the pamelbox, and connect the other end of the pigtail to the breaker?

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Old 09-10-2016, 09:13 AM   #11
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffmattero76 View Post
Why not just join the two hot wires and a pigtail under a wirenut inside the pamelbox, and connect the other end of the pigtail to the breaker?

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Some parts of Canada do not allow splices in the panel. If so the splice would need to be made outside the panel in a junction box.
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Old 09-10-2016, 09:21 AM   #12
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
Some parts of Canada do not allow splices in the panel. If so the splice would need to be made outside the panel in a junction box.

Thanks for the clarification. I should have added " here in the US", since i know nothing about Canadian code

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Old 09-10-2016, 09:36 AM   #13
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Re: Inspector feedback


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffmattero76 View Post
Thanks for the clarification. I should have added " here in the US", since i know nothing about Canadian code

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No problem at all. Just trying to add to to the discussion.
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