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Old 07-10-2009, 01:57 PM   #1
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induction


My question is how to swap a 30-in electrical cooktop with a induction one?

Yeah, beside a whopping $1600 spending and tons of self-convincing, I want to do it all by myself.

Would the work only involve?:
Taking the old one out
Plug in
Put the new one down
What else?
Admitting that Iíve never really got into beneath a cooktop (above the oven) to see what is going on there.

Saying that saved a lot of money to install it ourselves is a very powerful tool to get money from a husband.

Your help will be greatly appreciated.

Mechelle

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Old 07-10-2009, 03:46 PM   #2
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It SHOULD BE fairly straight forward. I'm guessing the induction unit is 220 VAC at 30-50 AMPS as is your electric cook top so as long as the cut out in your countertop will accept the induction unit, and the thickness of the two units is within 1/2 to 1" of each other, and there is no clearance conflict with anything below it, behind it, or to either side of it, it should be a go. Just turn off the power first in your breaker box and turn the cooktop on to make sure nothing is live. Be sure you have a set of ganged breakers about 10 amps higher than the rating of the induction unit and a jig saw or die grinder to open up the hole a little if it is tight. You need
1/8 - 1/4" larger hole than the LxW size of your unit.

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Old 07-10-2009, 11:23 PM   #3
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Here's what we need to help you:

1. The wire size and breaker size for your current setup
2. The nameplate data from the new unit. That is to say volts, amps, watts
3. Whether or not your new unit is cord connected or hard wired.
4. Whether or not your existing unit is cord connected or hard wired.
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Old 07-13-2009, 11:28 AM   #4
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Thanks, Bud,

You've answered my question. I will go to the HomeDepot to get the Inductiuon Unit electrical information and see if it mathes/fits the existing set up. I think it should. Also I will need to see if the cut out on the granite would hold the unit. Thank you again.

Mechelle
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Old 07-13-2009, 11:31 AM   #5
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Hi Goose,

Thanks for the new information. I understand pretty much all you are saying except a little unsure about the difference between the "cord" and the hard wire connection. I will go look it up. Thanks,

Mechelle
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Old 07-21-2009, 01:22 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goose134 View Post
Here's what we need to help you:

1. The wire size and breaker size for your current setup
2. The nameplate data from the new unit. That is to say volts, amps, watts
3. Whether or not your new unit is cord connected or hard wired.
4. Whether or not your existing unit is cord connected or hard wired.
My current cooktop setting is a 30 amp breaker with 10/3 wire. All the 30" induction cooktop require 40 amp breakers. I think that effectively cut to the end of my induction cooktop craving. Is there anything I can do other than break the house to re-wire the cooktop to continue the dream? Thank you,



Mechelle
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Old 07-22-2009, 11:50 AM   #7
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If the new cook top is rated 40 amps @ 240 volts on the nameplate, you must change the wire (cable) size to 8/3. If you have conduit, this will be a snap as you can pull out the old wires and pull in the new ones. Fishing cable is not that hard (IMO). Are you up to it? If you are, let us know and we can walk you through the process. Your dream is not lost. You just have some work to do. You should get a couple prices from licensed electricians. This is a fairly quick and easy job.
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Old 07-22-2009, 12:37 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
If the new cook top is rated 40 amps @ 240 volts on the nameplate, you must change the wire (cable) size to 8/3. If you have conduit, this will be a snap as you can pull out the old wires and pull in the new ones. Fishing cable is not that hard (IMO). Are you up to it? If you are, let us know and we can walk you through the process. Your dream is not lost. You just have some work to do. You should get a couple prices from licensed electricians. This is a fairly quick and easy job.
J.V.
Thank you for your posting that revived this thing. Still, though, the panel is in the finished basement and the wire goes through 30 feet in the ceiling to the kitchen above. It is not in the conduit. I am up to it but need guidence.Thanks again.

Mechelle
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:40 AM   #9
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Aside from the 30" induction cooktops that are made for the US consumer market, there are other options for more customized or unusual setups. For example, I have two of these:
http://ramblewoodgreen.com/product_detail.php?pid=40

They are side-by-side in my countertop, spaced about 6" apart. My countertop is black granite, and I had the cooktop cutouts routed so the ceramic top is flush with the granite surface. From across the room, the cooktops are almost invisible. A pair of those units (four burners total) will work on a single 30A circuit. They are HOT and relatively inexpensive compared to the name brands in the US. I think they were about $600 each, shipped from Hong Kong.

Of course, the ultimate in induction cooktops is CookTek:
http://www.cooktek.com/product_info.php?c=3&s=25&p=4

Better run a couple separate 40A circuits for a pair of those bad boys, and be ready to pay. But if it's good enough for Iron Chef America, it's good enough for your kitchen!
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Old 07-24-2009, 11:22 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechelle View Post
J.V.
Thank you for your posting that revived this thing. Still, though, the panel is in the finished basement and the wire goes through 30 feet in the ceiling to the kitchen above. It is not in the conduit. I am up to it but need guidence.Thanks again.

Mechelle
Mechelle,
You have to find a way to get your new cable from the panel to the cook top receptacle box. Start by opening the panel and the existing receptacle. See if you can pull the wires (cable). They may not be stapled but I doubt it. If it's loose just attach the new cable to the old cable and pull it through.
More than likely you will need a fish tape, string or chain and a small weight.
Tell me where the j-box is located in regards to the panel? Is the j-box directly above the panel? Same wall. Different wall. Whats the house type of construction? Block. Stick frame?
Have you had anyone price this for you? Really you might be surprised at the cost . Do you know anyone that can help you? This is a two person job.

Ps......Turn off power before attempting any work.
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Old 07-27-2009, 07:40 PM   #11
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J.V,
Hold on, let me get home and take some pictures of the panel and the wall, I think it is stappled right out of the panel box (can be accessed) and then through the holes in the joists to the kitchen on the groud floor. I will be back. What is the ball park price for such work from a professional? Hundreds? Over a gran? Thanks,

Mechelle

Quote:
Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
Mechelle,
You have to find a way to get your new cable from the panel to the cook top receptacle box. Start by opening the panel and the existing receptacle. See if you can pull the wires (cable). They may not be stapled but I doubt it. If it's loose just attach the new cable to the old cable and pull it through.
More than likely you will need a fish tape, string or chain and a small weight.
Tell me where the j-box is located in regards to the panel? Is the j-box directly above the panel? Same wall. Different wall. Whats the house type of construction? Block. Stick frame?
Have you had anyone price this for you? Really you might be surprised at the cost . Do you know anyone that can help you? This is a two person job.

Ps......Turn off power before attempting any work.

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